Rust oleum home colors

Rust oleum home colors DEFAULT

There IS a Right AND a Wrong Way to Paint Tile Floors

Let's start with this--there is definitely a right and wrong way to paint tile.  I have done both.  The funny thing is that the RIGHT way is actually easier than the wrong way.  If you want to read about my experience doing the WRONG way, read about my experience using chalk paint and while you're at it, check out my rad pattern, because you can still use that technique using the right materials!  Oh, and now I have experience laying luxury vinyl planks, so not all is lost.  I am all about learning and fun new experiences.

Prepping the Floor

I used Krud Kutter to clean and degrease the floor.  It prepares the surface for painting.  You can immediately tell the tile is a different texture.  Another important thing to have on hand is a hairdryer to blow off any dirt or hair, because, inevitably, it keeps finding it's way into the room.  Also, wear clean socks while working.  It helps if you don't wear them anywhere else so they don't bring in any dirt or dust.  Oh, and tape off your baseboards, bathtub, toilet, etc.  I like Frog Tape.

Rust-Oleum Home Floor Coating

Rust-Oleum Home Floor Coating is specifically made for painting tile floors.  It is a two-step system that includes a base coat and sealer and can be completed in 1-2 days.  It even has a "no peel" guarantee, which is awesome, since peeling was the problem with the chalk paint/poly combo.  I've seen numerous bloggers/Instagrammers use this product over and over, so I was anxious to try it.

I purchased a kit that included a quart each of base coat and sealer, along with a floor prep solution for $39.99.  You can also purchase it by the gallon, or individual quart.  I didn't use the floor prep because I had already used Krud Kutter when I discovered it in the box.  I knew from watching tutorials that Krud Kutter would be fine to use.  I also noticed all the warnings on the bottle which scared me.

I chose to use Ultra White, but you can have the can of paint tinted at the paint counter in a dozen or more colors.  

There are instructions on the cans, but I'll tell you what I did.  I rolled on my first coat of white with a small foam roller.  I did use a small artist's brush to get behind the toilet and in the grout along the baseboards in a few places.  I let this dry for 6 hours.

Part 2

After 6 hours, I put my clean socks back on and went back for another coat.  It says Ultra White takes 2 coats and the other tinted colors only take one.  You can see I definitely needed another coat.  It's still a little tacky when you're putting on the second coat.  This needs to dry for another 6 hours, but I let mine dry overnight, since I was doing this at 10 pm.  I learned from @AngelaRoseHome to wrap my paint roller in aluminum foil so it stays nice and fresh between paint jobs--genius!

Making your pattern

I wanted a pattern on this floor, but knew a stencil wouldn't work, because these tiles are textured and the paint would bleed under the stencil.  There are about a million at Cutting Edge StencilsI would love to use, though!  I had also tried (unsuccessfully) a sample of a removable tile decal, but it just doesn't work because of the textured edges.  That would be a great option if you have smooth tiles--they can be custom-made to size.  Hexagon Decor and BleUcoin on Etsy both have awesome designs.

I chose to do something in simple in our other bathroom, so I found a drink lid to make the pattern.  I thought about using that same pattern in here, but decided it was too busy.

I was thisclose to keeping it solid white, but I painted a couple test designs in different colors on white paper and laid them down on the tile to decide.  I wanted something simple that didn't compete with the wall too much, and distracted from the diagonal tile.

I chose to do a light grey pattern on each grout intersection, and since it was a VERY small amount of paint, I used chalk paint.  I would definitely recommend using the Rust-Oleum product in a different color if you were having the design cover much of the floor.  I am not concerned with this small amount of paint's durability.

Sealing

Once the paint was all dry, I rolled on one coat of the sealer and let it dry for a day.  It is ready for foot traffic in 24 hours, and you can move furniture back in after 72 hours, but it isn't fully cured for 7 days.  This was really easy.  It's super thin and watery, so you don't use hardly any of it.

Finishing Everything Up

I didn't have much trouble with any part of this project.  There were a couple small places where I didn't have the tape smooth that need to be touched up, but overall, this was very easy.  I also used a straight edge/razor blade to help release the tape along the baseboards, since I had trouble with this with my other bathroom.  I also took this opportunity to paint and caulk my baseboards, so everything looks super clean and fresh in here.  Caulking really helps finish off the tile and I highly recommend it.

The CORRECT way to paint your tile floors

The Rust-Oleum product was a real win here.  It really works and provides a beautiful result with the durability that matters.  It is easier than trying to do this with something like chalk paint.  I highly recommend it and painting all your old outdated tile.  I think this would work wonders on an ugly back splash.  You are really only limited by your imagination.  

Pin for Later!

Sours: https://www.greysnaildesigns.com/rust-oleum-home-floor-coating-for-painting-tile-floors

How I Painted (Yes, Painted!) Our Bathroom Floor

woman painting a tile floor with text overlay - how to paint a tile floor

It&#;s been a while since we chatted about our master bathroom &#; a few weeks back, I painted the tile floor with Rust-Oleum&#;s new Rock Solid Home paint, and I&#;m sharing all of the details on how to paint tile floors right here!

bathroom painted with DIY tile floor paint

The last few weeks in our house have been a tornado of cleaning, DIY, and prepping to get our house ready to put on the market, and I&#;m finally catching up on sharing the projects with you here. One of the most exciting projects we tackled was painting our bathroom floor. We&#;ve never been fans of the green tile that was in this space when we moved in, and I&#;ve been itching to do something about it for two years now &#; so it feels good to see this project through before we leave this house!

We used a brand new product from my friends at Rust-Oleum called Rustoleum HOME Interior Floor paint. It&#;s from the same line of paint as the epoxy we used on our garage flooring in the old house, and we loved that, so we knew we could trust it. This paint is specially formulated for painting flooring, and I&#;m so, so excited about it. It just hit stores this week, so if this is a project you&#;ve ever considered, read on!

I&#;ve had so many questions from so many of you who are eager to try this for yourself, so I&#;m hoping this post will be helpful and informative. Before we dive in, let&#;s take a look at what this bathroom looked like before we got started.

tile floor before painting

This post is sponsored by Rust-Oleum and contains affiliate links.

Ohhh that floor. It was so dark, and it made the entire room feel smaller and more closed in. I knew a fresh color would make a world of difference, and I still can&#;t get over how much brighter, cleaner, and more open the room feels now.

It&#;s pretty cute too, if you ask me.

I know you&#;re dying to hear all of the details, so let&#;s dive in!

bathroom with tile floor that has been painted

How to paint tile flooring

tools & Materials

Click here to see the base color options in the quart size

UPDATE: Since the original publishing of this post, Rust-Oleum has greatly expanded their color options of the Rust-Oleum HOME Floor Coating! They now offer deep tint bases with lots of dark color options, they offer all of their colors in both quart and gallon sizes, and they are available in all 50 states!See all the color options here.

Clean the flooring

Krud Kutter

The first (and most important) step of the process is to thoroughly (!!) clean your flooring. I can&#;t emphasize to you enough how vital this step is &#; if you don&#;t have clean floors, the paint can&#;t adhere properly and won&#;t last as long, so please don&#;t skimp on this part!

I started by sweeping, vacuuming, and mopping just like I normally would, then I went back in with the Krud Kutter spray and a rag and I scrubbed every inch of the floor. Be sure to pay special attention to the space along the baseboards and in the corners where dirt and hair can accumulate!

Note: It&#;s also recommended to remove caulk from around the tub and toilet before painting, as the paint will not stick to caulk. I didn&#;t do this, but I was extra careful in those areas and made sure to re-apply fresh caulk when the paint had dried.

Cut in around the edges

Once the floor is completely clean, you&#;re ready to get painting. You should start by cutting in with a high-quality, angled brush. I liked to work in sections (so, I&#;d cut in one part and then roll that same area), but you can also do the entire room before grabbing the roller.

Just be sure to move slowly and steadily &#; and if you don&#;t feel like you have a steady enough hand to avoid getting paint on the baseboards, you can always tape them off before you paint!

I started with Steam Gray, and painted the entire floor that color before doing the alternating squares.

Roll the rest of the floor

floor painted with one layer of Rust-Oleum's Rock Solid Home

Once you&#;ve cut in, grab a 3/8&#; nap roller and roll the rest of the floor. Be careful not to allow any drips to sit or paint to pool, or else it might create a texture in your finished product (ask me how I know).

You might want to use an extension pole to make this part easier if you&#;re working in a large space, but my bathroom was small enough that I just scooted around on the floor and painted with roller at the regular, short length.

Determine if you need a second coat

This paint does not require two coats &#; you may only need one! However, our floors were so dark and we were painting them so light, that I really needed to do a second coat after the first was dry.

After you&#;ve painted the first coat, you need to wait a minimum of six hoursbefore doing a second coat (or before sealing it, if you&#;re just doing one).

After you do the second coat, you only need to wait hours before adding the squares (or sealing it, if you&#;re just doing one color all over).

Tape off your squares and paint an alternating color

woman taping off flooring to create a checkboard pattern on tile floor
DIY painted checkerboard tile floor

I decided to do a checkerboard pattern on my floor. I was going to do a stencil but if you follow my Instagram stories you&#;ll know how that turned out. This was much faster and easier, and I adore the finished result!

All I did was tape off alternating squares (I left the grout the lighter color) and painted them Windsor Gray. Be sure to use delicate surfaces tape &#; I didn&#;t, and some of the paint got pulled off the grout since it wasn&#;t fully cured or sealed! It was easy to touch up, but I think delicate surfaces paint probably wouldn&#;t cause that issue.

Be sure to remove the tape immediately after you finish painting the squares &#; if it dries with the tape still on, you could pull up the paint when you remove it.

do Touch-ups, if needed

I had a few areas where the paint bled through the tape a bit, or where I had pulled paint off the grout with the tape. I went back in and quickly touched those up before sealing the paint.

Add the sealer

Finally, you&#;re ready to add your sealer. The top coat is similar to a polyurethane, so it&#;s much thinner than regular paint. Simply do the same combo of brushing and rolling to apply it all over the floor, only this time you should use a 1/4&#; nap to apply. Once you&#;re done, allow it to dry for 24 hours before you use the space!

DIY painted tile floor
checkerboard pattern on DIY painted tile floor
Rust-Oleum Rock Solid Home paint
finished bathroom with painted tile floor

I&#;m so, so, so excited about how this turned out, and I can&#;t get over how much better the room looks now!

As far as cleaning, you should avoid using any harsh chemicals or abrasive cleaners &#; regular old soap and water is fine, though, and I use my steam mop on it with no issues!

This project wraps up the master bathroom refresh we&#;ve been working on for months, and next week I&#;ll be back to share a detailed wrap-up of every project we did in here so you can see how we turned this into an entirely new space with almost nothing but paint! It was a super fun project and I can&#;t believe how different the bathroom looks now. Be sure to come back because you don&#;t want to miss it!

If you want to learn more about Rust-Oleum&#;s Rock Solid Home floor paint, click here to see all of the color options! It&#;s so much more affordable than replacing tile, and it&#;s a high-quality product so you know it&#;ll last for years and years to come!

Sours: https://www.loveandrenovations.com/paint-tile-floor/
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There IS a Right AND a Wrong Way to Paint Tile Floors

Let's start with this--there is definitely a right and wrong way to paint tile.  I have done both.  The funny thing is that the RIGHT way is actually easier than the wrong way.  If you want to read about my experience doing the WRONG way, read about my experience using chalk paint and while you're at it, check out my rad pattern, because you can still use that technique using the right materials!  Oh, and now I have experience laying luxury vinyl planks, so not all is lost.  I am all about learning and fun new experiences.

Prepping the Floor

I used Krud Kutter to clean and degrease the floor.  It prepares the surface for painting.  You can immediately tell the tile is a different texture.  Another important thing to have on hand is a hairdryer to blow off any dirt or hair, because, inevitably, it keeps finding it's way into the room.  Also, wear clean socks while working.  It helps if you don't wear them anywhere else so they don't bring in any dirt or dust.  Oh, and tape off your baseboards, bathtub, toilet, etc.  I like Frog Tape.

Rust-Oleum Home Floor Coating

Rust-Oleum Home Floor Coating is specifically made for painting tile floors.  It is a two-step system that includes a base coat and sealer and can be completed in days.  It even has a "no peel" guarantee, which is awesome, since peeling was the problem with the chalk paint/poly combo.  I've seen numerous bloggers/Instagrammers use this product over and over, so I was anxious to try it.

I purchased a kit that included a quart each of base coat and sealer, along with a floor prep solution for $  You can also purchase it by the gallon, or individual quart.  I didn't use the floor prep because I had already used Krud Kutter when I discovered it in the box.  I knew from watching tutorials that Krud Kutter would be fine to use.  I also noticed all the warnings on the bottle which scared me.

I chose to use Ultra White, but you can have the can of paint tinted at the paint counter in a dozen or more colors.  

There are instructions on the cans, but I'll tell you what I did.  I rolled on my first coat of white with a small foam roller.  I did use a small artist's brush to get behind the toilet and in the grout along the baseboards in a few places.  I let this dry for 6 hours.

Part 2

After 6 hours, I put my clean socks back on and went back for another coat.  It says Ultra White takes 2 coats and the other tinted colors only take one.  You can see I definitely needed another coat.  It's still a little tacky when you're putting on the second coat.  This needs to dry for another 6 hours, but I let mine dry overnight, since I was doing this at 10 pm.  I learned from @AngelaRoseHome to wrap my paint roller in aluminum foil so it stays nice and fresh between paint jobs--genius!

Making your pattern

I wanted a pattern on this floor, but knew a stencil wouldn't work, because these tiles are textured and the paint would bleed under the stencil.  There are about a million at Cutting Edge StencilsI would love to use, though!  I had also tried (unsuccessfully) a sample of a removable tile decal, but it just doesn't work because of the textured edges.  That would be a great option if you have smooth tiles--they can be custom-made to size.  Hexagon Decor and BleUcoin on Etsy both have awesome designs.

I chose to do something in simple in our other bathroom, so I found a drink lid to make the pattern.  I thought about using that same pattern in here, but decided it was too busy.

I was thisclose to keeping it solid white, but I painted a couple test designs in different colors on white paper and laid them down on the tile to decide.  I wanted something simple that didn't compete with the wall too much, and distracted from the diagonal tile.

I chose to do a light grey pattern on each grout intersection, and since it was a VERY small amount of paint, I used chalk paint.  I would definitely recommend using the Rust-Oleum product in a different color if you were having the design cover much of the floor.  I am not concerned with this small amount of paint's durability.

Sealing

Once the paint was all dry, I rolled on one coat of the sealer and let it dry for a day.  It is ready for foot traffic in 24 hours, and you can move furniture back in after 72 hours, but it isn't fully cured for 7 days.  This was really easy.  It's super thin and watery, so you don't use hardly any of it.

Finishing Everything Up

I didn't have much trouble with any part of this project.  There were a couple small places where I didn't have the tape smooth that need to be touched up, but overall, this was very easy.  I also used a straight edge/razor blade to help release the tape along the baseboards, since I had trouble with this with my other bathroom.  I also took this opportunity to paint and caulk my baseboards, so everything looks super clean and fresh in here.  Caulking really helps finish off the tile and I highly recommend it.

The CORRECT way to paint your tile floors

The Rust-Oleum product was a real win here.  It really works and provides a beautiful result with the durability that matters.  It is easier than trying to do this with something like chalk paint.  I highly recommend it and painting all your old outdated tile.  I think this would work wonders on an ugly back splash.  You are really only limited by your imagination.  

Pin for Later!

Sours: https://www.greysnaildesigns.com/rust-oleum-home-floor-coating-for-painting-tile-floors
How to Paint Tile Floors With Rust-Oleum HOME Floor Coating

Review and Lesson Learned! Rust-Oleum RockSolid Home Floor Paint System

** NOTE: I purchased this product and accessories at full price - $49.95 for each can of the base coat, $49.95 for the top coat, and a few bucks for two 3/8” nap rollers, one high quality angled brush for cutting in, and two disposable paint trays. I did not receive any discount or free items in exchange for my review (it would have been nice but whatevs…).

Rust-Oleum RockSolid Home Floor Paint System is a two-step interior floor product meant to cover up unsightly wood, tile, and linoleum floors without sanding, stripping, priming, or other prepping measures.

Last summer, we pulled up the ugly carpet in my boyfriend’s house to reveal the original hardwood floors, which were in desperate need of refinishing. The wood itself was in good shape but the finish definitely needed some love. And guess what I didn’t work on at all last summer? Yes, the hardwood floors… (I utterly ABHOR sanding).

Fast forward to a month ago – hardwoods were still in desperate need of refinishing, I just married boyfriend, and it’s time to sell his house. As much as we wanted to continue ignoring this issue, we were concerned that the first thing potential buyers would see when they crossed the threshold was the water stained, discolored floors. We’d been pricing hiring someone to come in and sand the floors down but our research showed it will cost just as much to have them redone as it would to just refloor everything - between $2,000-$3,000. And that’s exactly what we didn’t want to do – drop a few thousand on something we may or may not recoup AND not even be around to enjoy it. So by some miraculous event, the RockSolid Home Floor Paint System came out as soon as we started to get panicky.

The process is simple – pick one of 18 colors for your base coat, decide on the sheen of the top coat, clean the floors, apply the base coat, and apply the top coat. Boom, a new look. It wasn’t quite as straight forward as that when we actually went through the process but the following is our experience as well as our lessons learned.

Step one: Pick your base coat color. Rust-Oleum has 18 colors to pick from ranging from grays, beiges, and some surprising blues and greens. There’s even a white. We chose ‘greige’ and went to the only store in the St. Louis area that had the system in stock – Home Depot. The paint staff didn’t know a lot about the product since it was so new but they were super helpful and asked that we return to let them know how the product performed and if we liked the results. We watched the tinting process and the associate pull up the ‘greige’ color in the computer but found that the final result didn’t look like the brochure’s color chart. The associate thought it might look different on the floor vs a metal lid so we agreed to try before trying any further tinting.

We also picked out our top coat sheen (step two). There are two options – matte and semi gloss. We went with the semi gloss as we thought it would give a cleaner, freshly mopped and waxed look when we were done with it.

Sadly, the color represented the same on the can lid and on the floor. Instead of ‘greige’ it looked more like the yellowy-beige ‘cake batter’ color.

Um, nope...

I called the Rust-Oleum customer service phone number to asked these questions:

  • Had anyone else called in to report an issue with the tinting process?

  • Can we take it back and have it manually tinted to the color we were hoping for?

  • If so, does the added tint have to be one of the Rust-oleum colors? Clearly Greige isn't working properly so would adding more of the same work or should be try another?

  • Would using a non-Rust-Oleum tint affect the paint’s adhesion integrity? Would I be screwing up the way the paint adhered to the floor by bringing in a foreign tint?

The extremely friendly phone rep didn’t know the answer to any of the questions and thought that as long as there was room in the can to add tint, we could try it. She did note that the tint amounts for each Rust-Oleum color were pre-portioned so there might not be enough room in the can for another dose of Greige or any other of the Floor Paint System's colors for that matter.

I also mentioned the issue on Rust-Oleum’s Facebook page. They quickly replied back and I was able to send them pictures via direct message so they could look into the issue further. Honestly, I think it was a miscalibration issue at the store. New product, new colors – totally understandable. I’ve used a LOT of Rust-Oleum products over the years and they’ve always been true to sample.

We did take the base coat back to Home Depot to manually tint to match. And to complicate things, because we didn’t trust the ‘Greige’ setting and didn’t want to make it worse, we went with matching ‘Aged Gray’. The color matching came out perfect – thank you, Home Depot!

Each can of base coat covers 400 square feet so we purchased two coats to cover a bedroom, hallway, and living room, about 550 square feet in total.

Step three: clean the floors. Since sanding, stripping, and priming are not a factor here, cleaning THROUGHLY is an absolute must. Vacuum, use a dry dusting cloth, and mop with a product that does not leave residue behind. Wipe over with clean water, just in case there is residue, though. While we used this system on porous wood floors, the product description notes that if you are using on tile or linoleum surfaces, clean with an abrasive cleaner to help with paint adhesion. Note: we did the vacuum, dry dusting, and mopping steps in the bedroom but forgot the mopping in the living room.

Step four: apply the base coat. Starting furthest from the door, I cut in around the edges while my husband did the rolling. Working together allowed the process to go extremely fast and ensured none of our edges dried before we were able to blend them into the next section.

The paint dried to a matte finish and the areas of the floor that had water spots dried slightly darker. We waited the recommended one to two hours and went over the water spots again as well as any areas that we thought needed more coverage with a second coat. We let fully dry for 6 hours.

No brush strokes!

My husband learned an important lesson. Much like “don’t paint yourself in a corner”, he learned that you don’t put your beer down on a windowsill and paint yourself on the other side of the room. Rookie... ;)

Also, when tinting the base coat, the Home Depot associate noted that the smell was very strong. However, when we opened the can and started painting, the smell was very minimal. I think the tint itself might have a strong odor but when fully mixed with the can of base, it’s not an issue.

Lesson learned: don’t walk on the base coat with bare feet! Wear socks instead. After the six hours of drying, we were ready to apply the top coat. However, we had two spots that unexpectedly stuck to our bare feet and pulled the base coat away.

I finger dabbed these two places with base coat and let dry the six hours while we worked around them as we worked on the top coat. The spots dried and blended in perfectly. After completing the floor, I was unable to find them later.

Step five: apply the top coat. This part went even faster. We tag teamed again with me painting the edging and husband doing the rolling. We could see the huge difference in sheen as we worked, covering up the matte base coat with the semi-gloss top coat.

We waited the specified ‘full cure’ time frame of seven days before doing anything on these floors in order to give them as much time as possible to dry undisturbed. On day 8, we had a cleaning crew in to deep clean the house just prior to taking professional pictures to put the house up for sale. The cleaners used a bare floor vacuum and this left short, tiny scratches randomly through the living room. They were too small to see when standing and viewing the room but if you sat down on the floor and looked closely, you could spot them. There were no scratches in the bedroom, though but this was the room we’d remembered to mop. We aren’t sure if this was actually why the scratching occurred in the living room but it’s our best guess. That or housekeeping cheated and didn’t vacuum the bedroom at all…

Bedroom (perfect!):

Living Room (can't tell where the tiny scratches are):

Even the professional photographer's well-lit pictures look great (he couldn't have bothered to move the modem and router out of the picture??? Lol)

Lesson learned: The can notes that only one coat of the top coat is needed but I would highly recommend applying two top coat layers for the added protection.

Lesson learned: We used 1.5 cans of base coat with a few areas of recoating to .5 cans of top coat. We returned the second can of top coat since it was unopened. The system requires both the base and the top coat but you won’t go through them at the same rate. Even if we’d done a second top coat, we would have only required one can for the 550-ish square foot area. This might be especially helpful if Rust-Oleum starts selling this system in quart sized cans.

After the vacuuming incident, we waited another week (a full 14 days since applying the top coat) to schedule the open house and give the floor even more time to cure. That seemed to do the trick. A busy open house, multiple additional showings, and two inspections later – we’ve seen no additional scratches and floor continues to shine beautifully.

Final thoughts – I’m extremely happy we went this route! The product is performing great, despite some minor setbacks with tinting and cure time. Knowing what I know now, I’d recommend:

  • Clean as thoroughly as possible and in multiple ways. Vacuuming alone will not get the floor ready. Abrasive cleansers will help prep the floor but go over every inch again with clean water to ensure there is no residue.

  • Start painting as soon as the floors have dried from cleaning. This will keep any dust, pet hair, your hair, weird things from blowing out of air vents and settling on the floor. We did paint in a few dog hairs here and there, even with all of the cleaning.

  • Walk on the dried base coat with socks only.

  • Damage and water spotting on wood floors will need a second layer of base coat to keep the color uniform throughout the room.

  • Two cans of base coat will only require one can of top coat, even if you go my recommended route of two top coats.

  • Apply two coats of top coat to ensure as much protection as possible.

  • Allow to fully cure OVER seven days before doing anything that might otherwise scratch the floor. 14 days worked well in our case.

Beautiful! I love that the paint covers up the water spots and discoloration to give it new life but it still lets the charm of the wood floor planks come through!

#rustoleum#rustoleum#paint#rocksolid#floorpaint#review#productreview#floors#woodfloor#floor#floorrefinishing

Sours: https://www.vickiliston.com/post/2019/10/29/review-and-lesson-learned-rust-oleum-rocksolid-home-floor-paint-system

Home colors oleum rust

Rust-Oleum Home Interior Floor Coating Kit, navy

PREPARATION

  • Clean floor and remove any wax or caulk.
  • Allow floor to dry.
  • Tape off base boards, cut ins and other areas to protect from paint.
  • Stir base coat to mix.
  • NO NEED TO PRIME, SAND OR STRIP.

STEP 1 - APPLY BASE COAT

  • Using a high-quality synthetic brush, paint perimeter and corners.
  • Apply base coat with a 3/8” nap roller, making sure to keep a wet edge.
  • For best results, work in 4x4 ft. sections.
  • Allow to dry 6 hours before custom stencils or top coating.
  • If desired, add different Base Coat color to create patterns or with stencil once first coat has dried.

STEP 2 - APPLY TOP COAT (REQUIRED)

  • TOP COAT IS REQUIRED FOR DURABILITY
  • Apply top coat with a 1/4” nap roller, making sure to keep a wet edge.
  • For best results, work in 4x4 ft. sections.
  • Must dry at least 24 hours before light foot traffic.
  • Wait 7 days before cleaning painted floors.
Sours: https://www.amazon.com/Rust-OleumInterior-Floor-Coating/dp/B08L7JX2VR
HOW TO PAINT YOUR FLOORS TO LAST - RockSolid Home by Rust Oleum

Review and Lesson Learned! Rust-Oleum RockSolid Home Floor Paint System

** NOTE: I purchased this product and accessories at full price - $ for each can of the base coat, $ for the top coat, and a few bucks for two 3/8” nap rollers, one high quality angled brush for cutting in, and two disposable paint trays. I did not receive any discount or free items in exchange for my review (it would have been nice but whatevs…).

Rust-Oleum RockSolid Home Floor Paint System is a two-step interior floor product meant to cover up unsightly wood, tile, and linoleum floors without sanding, stripping, priming, or other prepping measures.

Last summer, we pulled up the ugly carpet in my boyfriend’s house to reveal the original hardwood floors, which were in desperate need of refinishing. The wood itself was in good shape but the finish definitely needed some love. And guess what I didn’t work on at all last summer? Yes, the hardwood floors… (I utterly ABHOR sanding).

Fast forward to a month ago – hardwoods were still in desperate need of refinishing, I just married boyfriend, and it’s time to sell his house. As much as we wanted to continue ignoring this issue, we were concerned that the first thing potential buyers would see when they crossed the threshold was the water stained, discolored floors. We’d been pricing hiring someone to come in and sand the floors down but our research showed it will cost just as much to have them redone as it would to just refloor everything - between $2,$3, And that’s exactly what we didn’t want to do – drop a few thousand on something we may or may not recoup AND not even be around to enjoy it. So by some miraculous event, the RockSolid Home Floor Paint System came out as soon as we started to get panicky.

The process is simple – pick one of 18 colors for your base coat, decide on the sheen of the top coat, clean the floors, apply the base coat, and apply the top coat. Boom, a new look. It wasn’t quite as straight forward as that when we actually went through the process but the following is our experience as well as our lessons learned.

Step one: Pick your base coat color. Rust-Oleum has 18 colors to pick from ranging from grays, beiges, and some surprising blues and greens. There’s even a white. We chose ‘greige’ and went to the only store in the St. Louis area that had the system in stock – Home Depot. The paint staff didn’t know a lot about the product since it was so new but they were super helpful and asked that we return to let them know how the product performed and if we liked the results. We watched the tinting process and the associate pull up the ‘greige’ color in the computer but found that the final result didn’t look like the brochure’s color chart. The associate thought it might look different on the floor vs a metal lid so we agreed to try before trying any further tinting.

We also picked out our top coat sheen (step two). There are two options – matte and semi gloss. We went with the semi gloss as we thought it would give a cleaner, freshly mopped and waxed look when we were done with it.

Sadly, the color represented the same on the can lid and on the floor. Instead of ‘greige’ it looked more like the yellowy-beige ‘cake batter’ color.

Um, nope

I called the Rust-Oleum customer service phone number to asked these questions:

  • Had anyone else called in to report an issue with the tinting process?

  • Can we take it back and have it manually tinted to the color we were hoping for?

  • If so, does the added tint have to be one of the Rust-oleum colors? Clearly Greige isn't working properly so would adding more of the same work or should be try another?

  • Would using a non-Rust-Oleum tint affect the paint’s adhesion integrity? Would I be screwing up the way the paint adhered to the floor by bringing in a foreign tint?

The extremely friendly phone rep didn’t know the answer to any of the questions and thought that as long as there was room in the can to add tint, we could try it. She did note that the tint amounts for each Rust-Oleum color were pre-portioned so there might not be enough room in the can for another dose of Greige or any other of the Floor Paint System's colors for that matter.

I also mentioned the issue on Rust-Oleum’s Facebook page. They quickly replied back and I was able to send them pictures via direct message so they could look into the issue further. Honestly, I think it was a miscalibration issue at the store. New product, new colors – totally understandable. I’ve used a LOT of Rust-Oleum products over the years and they’ve always been true to sample.

We did take the base coat back to Home Depot to manually tint to match. And to complicate things, because we didn’t trust the ‘Greige’ setting and didn’t want to make it worse, we went with matching ‘Aged Gray’. The color matching came out perfect – thank you, Home Depot!

Each can of base coat covers square feet so we purchased two coats to cover a bedroom, hallway, and living room, about square feet in total.

Step three: clean the floors. Since sanding, stripping, and priming are not a factor here, cleaning THROUGHLY is an absolute must. Vacuum, use a dry dusting cloth, and mop with a product that does not leave residue behind. Wipe over with clean water, just in case there is residue, though. While we used this system on porous wood floors, the product description notes that if you are using on tile or linoleum surfaces, clean with an abrasive cleaner to help with paint adhesion. Note: we did the vacuum, dry dusting, and mopping steps in the bedroom but forgot the mopping in the living room.

Step four: apply the base coat. Starting furthest from the door, I cut in around the edges while my husband did the rolling. Working together allowed the process to go extremely fast and ensured none of our edges dried before we were able to blend them into the next section.

The paint dried to a matte finish and the areas of the floor that had water spots dried slightly darker. We waited the recommended one to two hours and went over the water spots again as well as any areas that we thought needed more coverage with a second coat. We let fully dry for 6 hours.

No brush strokes!

My husband learned an important lesson. Much like “don’t paint yourself in a corner”, he learned that you don’t put your beer down on a windowsill and paint yourself on the other side of the room. Rookie ;)

Also, when tinting the base coat, the Home Depot associate noted that the smell was very strong. However, when we opened the can and started painting, the smell was very minimal. I think the tint itself might have a strong odor but when fully mixed with the can of base, it’s not an issue.

Lesson learned: don’t walk on the base coat with bare feet! Wear socks instead. After the six hours of drying, we were ready to apply the top coat. However, we had two spots that unexpectedly stuck to our bare feet and pulled the base coat away.

I finger dabbed these two places with base coat and let dry the six hours while we worked around them as we worked on the top coat. The spots dried and blended in perfectly. After completing the floor, I was unable to find them later.

Step five: apply the top coat. This part went even faster. We tag teamed again with me painting the edging and husband doing the rolling. We could see the huge difference in sheen as we worked, covering up the matte base coat with the semi-gloss top coat.

We waited the specified ‘full cure’ time frame of seven days before doing anything on these floors in order to give them as much time as possible to dry undisturbed. On day 8, we had a cleaning crew in to deep clean the house just prior to taking professional pictures to put the house up for sale. The cleaners used a bare floor vacuum and this left short, tiny scratches randomly through the living room. They were too small to see when standing and viewing the room but if you sat down on the floor and looked closely, you could spot them. There were no scratches in the bedroom, though but this was the room we’d remembered to mop. We aren’t sure if this was actually why the scratching occurred in the living room but it’s our best guess. That or housekeeping cheated and didn’t vacuum the bedroom at all…

Bedroom (perfect!):

Living Room (can't tell where the tiny scratches are):

Even the professional photographer's well-lit pictures look great (he couldn't have bothered to move the modem and router out of the picture??? Lol)

Lesson learned: The can notes that only one coat of the top coat is needed but I would highly recommend applying two top coat layers for the added protection.

Lesson learned: We used cans of base coat with a few areas of recoating to .5 cans of top coat. We returned the second can of top coat since it was unopened. The system requires both the base and the top coat but you won’t go through them at the same rate. Even if we’d done a second top coat, we would have only required one can for the ish square foot area. This might be especially helpful if Rust-Oleum starts selling this system in quart sized cans.

After the vacuuming incident, we waited another week (a full 14 days since applying the top coat) to schedule the open house and give the floor even more time to cure. That seemed to do the trick. A busy open house, multiple additional showings, and two inspections later – we’ve seen no additional scratches and floor continues to shine beautifully.

Final thoughts – I’m extremely happy we went this route! The product is performing great, despite some minor setbacks with tinting and cure time. Knowing what I know now, I’d recommend:

  • Clean as thoroughly as possible and in multiple ways. Vacuuming alone will not get the floor ready. Abrasive cleansers will help prep the floor but go over every inch again with clean water to ensure there is no residue.

  • Start painting as soon as the floors have dried from cleaning. This will keep any dust, pet hair, your hair, weird things from blowing out of air vents and settling on the floor. We did paint in a few dog hairs here and there, even with all of the cleaning.

  • Walk on the dried base coat with socks only.

  • Damage and water spotting on wood floors will need a second layer of base coat to keep the color uniform throughout the room.

  • Two cans of base coat will only require one can of top coat, even if you go my recommended route of two top coats.

  • Apply two coats of top coat to ensure as much protection as possible.

  • Allow to fully cure OVER seven days before doing anything that might otherwise scratch the floor. 14 days worked well in our case.

Beautiful! I love that the paint covers up the water spots and discoloration to give it new life but it still lets the charm of the wood floor planks come through!

#rustoleum#rustoleum#paint#rocksolid#floorpaint#review#productreview#floors#woodfloor#floor#floorrefinishing

Sours: https://www.vickiliston.com/post//10/29/review-and-lesson-learned-rust-oleum-rocksolid-home-floor-paint-system

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I dont remember how long her monologue lasted, only the sight of a naked girl in walking distance did not contribute to the clarity of thinking. On the contrary, all the capes were focused on her body. More precisely, at a certain point on her body. And she paced around the room, bent over, picking up something from the floor, while standing out her ass with folds.

Of a pie.



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