Va disability for osteoarthritis

Va disability for osteoarthritis DEFAULT

[gravityform id="1" title="true" description="true" ajax="true"]

[gravityform id="3" title="true" description="true"]

<div class='gf_browser_unknown gform_wrapper first-time-popup_wrapper gform_legacy_markup_wrapper' id='gform_wrapper_3' > <div class='gform_heading'> <h3 class="gform_title">Free Legal Consultation</h3> <span class='gform_description'>Fill out this form and we'll contact you.woodslawyers.com/joint-pain-disability-rating-increase/' /></div></li><li id="field_3_8" class="gfield gfield--width-full gform_hidden field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_8' id='input_3_8' type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' aria-invalid="false" value='' /></div></li><li id="field_3_9" class="gfield gform_validation_container field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_3_9' >Comments</label><div class='ginput_container'><input name='input_9' id='input_3_9' type='text' value='' autocomplete='new-password'/></div><div class='gfield_description' id='gfield_description_3_9'>This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.</div></li></ul></div> <div class='gform_footer top_label'> <input type='submit' id='gform_submit_button_3' class='gform_button button' value='Send Form' onclick='if(window["gf_submitting_3"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_3"]=true;} ' onkeypress='if( event.keyCode == 13 ){ if(window["gf_submitting_3"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_3"]=true;} jQuery("#gform_3").trigger("submit",[true]); }' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='is_submit_3' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_submit' value='3' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_unique_id' value='' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='state_3' value='WyJbXSIsImI4YmYyM2E3NWM0OGZhNzk3NmM4NDhhYTdjNTFiYTA0Il0=' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_target_page_number_3' id='gform_target_page_number_3' value='0' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_source_page_number_3' id='gform_source_page_number_3' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' name='gform_field_values' value='' /> </div> <p style="display: none !important;"><label>&#916;<textarea name="ak_hp_textarea" cols="45" rows="8" maxlength="100"></textarea></label><input type="hidden" id="ak_js" name="ak_js" value="80"/><script>document.getElementById( "ak_js" ).setAttribute( "value", ( new Date() ).getTime() );</script></p></form> </div>

[gravityform id="6" title="true" description="true"]

</label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_textarea'><textarea name='input_4' id='input_6_4' class='textarea medium' placeholder='Tell us about your hearing problems from 3M earplugs.' aria-invalid="false" rows='10' cols='50'></textarea></div></li></ul></div> <div class='gform_footer top_label'> <input type='submit' id='gform_submit_button_6' class='gform_button button' value='Get Help Now' onclick='if(window["gf_submitting_6"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_6"]=true;} ' onkeypress='if( event.keyCode == 13 ){ if(window["gf_submitting_6"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_6"]=true;} jQuery("#gform_6").trigger("submit",[true]); }' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='is_submit_6' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_submit' value='6' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_unique_id' value='' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='state_6' value='WyJbXSIsImI4YmYyM2E3NWM0OGZhNzk3NmM4NDhhYTdjNTFiYTA0Il0=' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_target_page_number_6' id='gform_target_page_number_6' value='0' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_source_page_number_6' id='gform_source_page_number_6' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' name='gform_field_values' value='' /> </div> <p style="display: none !important;"><label>&#916;<textarea name="ak_hp_textarea" cols="45" rows="8" maxlength="100"></textarea></label><input type="hidden" id="ak_js" name="ak_js" value="201"/><script>document.getElementById( "ak_js" ).setAttribute( "value", ( new Date() ).getTime() );</script></p></form> </div>

Sours: https://www.woodslawyers.com/joint-pain-disability-rating-increase/

How The VA Rates Arthritis

How The VA Rates ArthritisArthritis affects one out of every five Americans. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, arthritis is the number one cause of disability in America and most who suffer from the condition are working adults.

The VA statistics in this area for veterans? One out of three vets suffers from arthritis. Half of those who report problems with the condition say it limits daily activities.

Arthritis can be managed with a combination of clinical therapy, healthy lifestyle choices, and weight management. For those with the condition, how does the Department of Veterans Affairs rate arthritis?

An important thing to note along these lines is the VA’s stance on arthritis as a condition. According to the VA official site, “Although the word arthritis actually means joint inflammation, the term is used to describe more than 100 rheumatic diseases and conditions that affect joints, the tissues that surround the joint and other connective tissue.”


VA Arthritis Ratings

The Department of Veterans Affairs does not assign a single disability rating for arthritis. Much depends on the nature and severity of the condition. What you read here is current at the time of this writing according to the VA, but disability percentage rating procedures, criteria, and amounts are always subject to change through legislation, VA policy, etc.

Always consult the VA about your condition, possible rating percentages, and qualifying criteria.

Condition

Arthritis rheumatoid (atrophic) as an active process with “constitutional manifestations associated with active joint involvement, totally incapacitating

VA Disability Rating

100%


Condition

Arthritis rheumatoid (atrophic) as an active process with “less than criteria for 100% but with weight loss and anemia” productive of “severe impairment of health or severely incapacitating exacerbations occurring 4 or more times a year or a lesser number over prolonged periods.

VA Disability Rating

60%


Condition

Arthritis rheumatoid (atrophic) as an active process less than criteria for 100% but with weight loss and anemia with symptom combinations productive of definite impairment of health objectively supported by examination findings or incapacitating exacerbations occurring 3 or more times a year

VA Disability Rating

40%


Condition

Arthritis rheumatoid (atrophic) as an active process with “less than criteria for 100% but with weight loss and anemia” with one or two exacerbations a year in a well-established diagnosis.

VA Disability Rating

20%


Condition

Arthritis, degenerative (hypertrophic or osteoarthritis). The Department of Veterans Affairs says of this condition that, when established via X-rays, the VA disability rating will be made “on the basis of limitation of motion under the appropriate diagnostic codes for the specific joint or joints involved.

But in cases where “the limitation of motion of the specific joint or joints involved is noncompensable under the appropriate diagnostic codes,” a rating of 10%  “is for application for each such major joint or group of minor joints affected by limitation of motion, to be combined, not added under diagnostic code 5003.”

There are too many major and minor joint issues to comprehensively list here, but veterans should ask a VA representative about this type of VA rating and what the current percentages may be for the veteran’s specific medical issue related to joints, arthritis, etc.

VA guidelines for this type of arthritis condition state that any diagnosed arthritis-related limited range of motion must “be objectively confirmed by findings such as swelling, muscle spasm, or satisfactory evidence of painful motion.” In cases where there is no limited motion, VA ratings are as follows:

Condition

Degenerative arthritis with X-ray evidence of involvement of two or more major joints or two or more minor joint groups, with occasional incapacitating exacerbations.

VA Disability Rating

20%


Condition

Degenerative arthritis with X-ray evidence of involvement of two or more major joints or two or more minor joint groups.

VA Disability Rating

10%


Important Information On Combined Ratings For The Degenerative Arthritis Condition

The VA policy in this area includes a prohibition on combining ratings. The VA official site states that 20% and 10% ratings mentioned above cannot be combined “with ratings based on limitation of motion”.


Advice For Veterans Suffering From Arthritis

  • Consider using online and community-based physical-activity and arthritis-management programs.
  • Make regular appointments with a physical therapist. This can help manage functional limitations, stick with an exercise program designed to help with the condition, etc. You may also be able to get help with assistive devices that may be useful for arthritis sufferers.
  • There is evidence that “integrative health approaches” or certain kinds of reputable alternative therapies may be useful for those suffering from arthritis. The VA official site suggests that Yoga, tai chi and massage therapy could help in the right circumstances.
  • Stay up with current research and developments in arthritis care. The Department of VA has active arthritis research projects from lab studies to new medications and therapy programs. Learn more about ongoing VA arthritis research.

About The AuthorJoe Wallace is a 13-year veteran of the United States Air Force and a former reporter for Air Force Television News


Filed Under: Benefits

Sours: https://militarybenefits.info/how-va-rates-arthritis/
  1. Highland beach club for sale
  2. Hannay reels dealer near me
  3. Mega man x armor

How does the VA rate my arthritis disability?

According to an article in the 2012 Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, U.S. soldiers and veterans have been significantly affected by osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OA occurs when cartilage—a connective, structural tissue in the body that’s more flexible than bone—breaks down. RA is an autoimmune disorder that attacks the lining of the joints. Both types of arthritis are painful and sometimes debilitating.

In active service personnel under 40, OA is the leading cause of disability and medical discharge, and those on active duty as well as veterans are two times more likely to suffer from OA than civilians. When a soldier is diagnosed with RA during active duty, the Medical Evaluation Board automatically sets up a hearing that usually results in the soldier’s medical discharge from service. Between 2003 and 2009, Army statistics reported that the number of soldiers medically retired from the Army with at least one type of musculoskeletal condition increased almost 10 times.

Because arthritis is so prevalent in soldiers and veterans, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) determined that this condition is service-connected if diagnosed within a year of discharge. However, if symptoms of arthritis present in later years, you may still be eligible for VA disability.

Why Soldiers Are At a Higher Risk for Arthritis

OA can impact any joint in the body, but it most often affects weight-bearing joints: the ankles, spine, knees, and sometimes fingers. Often called the “wear-and-tear disease,” OA is painful because when the cartilage breaks down, bare bones rub together. Over time, those bones can thicken, become malformed, and form bony spurs—all of which create pain that can be debilitating.

Soldiers are at an increased risk for OA because the wear and tear on their joints can be extreme and excessive. Those in active duty face rigorous training, multiple deployments, and carry heavy equipment and body armor that can create intense pressure on joints and contribute to arthritis. In the early years of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, service personnel carried between 80 and 120 pounds of gear. While troops now have lighter tactical gear that is often less than 20 pounds, they may still need to wear heavier armor under certain circumstances.

Additionally, combat wounds such as joint injuries from shrapnel and broken bones from roadside bombs can eventually lead to OA. During the Iraq war, a study of service personnel who were injured on the battlefield found that OA was the main reason these soldiers were discharged.

How the VA Rates Arthritis

If you have service-connected arthritis, a VA rating specialist will look at the following factors when determining your rating:

  • Functional loss. This rating focuses on the limitations of the joint’s range of motion. For example, the VA rating specialist will evaluate an arthritic knee by its ability to perform normal, working movements.
  • Instability. The VA rating specialist will categorize instability of the joint in three ways: slight (10%), moderate (20%), or severe (30%). It’s important that your doctor use these three terms to explain your limitations due to arthritis. Additionally, he should explain why your condition falls into that particular category.
  • Pain. Most veterans with arthritis experience pain. While the VA rating system doesn’t usually recognize pain as a disability, it may be factored in for arthritis—especially if it affects the knee. Even if your range of motion is fine, and there appears to be no functional loss, the VA may still grant a rating in this category if you can provide evidence that the range of motion is affected by pain when the joint is used in a normal, repetitive way. The VA may recognize that the pain is impacting your ability to use that joint.

If you suffer from OA or RA, and your symptoms make it difficult or impossible to work or sustain gainful employment, you may be eligible for VA disability benefits. Or if you’ve applied and were denied benefits, call Cuddigan Law at (402) 933-5405  Be sure to ask for a copy of our free book, The Essential Guide to VA Disability Claims.

Sours: https://www.cuddiganlaw.com/faqs/how-arthritis-disability-is-rated-by-the-va.cfm
VA Disability Ratings for Hip Pain and Hip Conditions

VA Disability For Arthritis

Was Your VA Disability Claim For Arthritis Denied?

We’ve helped thousands of veterans nationwide appeal denied VA claims and win. If you have received a negative decision from the VA, Call for a free case review. If we don’t win, you pay nothing.

Free Case Review

No Win, No Fee

Was Your VA Disability Claim For Arthritis Denied?

More than 52.5 million individuals in the U.S. suffer from arthritis, which is roughly one out of every five adults in the nation. While there are many things that can cause this condition, some causes are related to the sufferer’s military service and are eligible for VA benefits. However, because of the way the VA rates the most common form of arthritis to affect service members, disability claims for this type of condition are often rejected. If you have been diagnosed with arthritis that was the result of overuse or a traumatic injury that occurred while you were in the service, an experienced VA benefits lawyer can assist you in appealing your denied claim and ensuring that you have the documentation that is necessary to prove that your arthritis was a result of service-related activities.

How Does the VA Rate Arthritis?

The VA rates arthritis differently, depending on whether the veteran has been diagnosed with the degenerative form of the disease that often results from overuse or traumatic injury and is the most common form of arthritis to affect veterans, or rheumatoid arthritis, which is an inflammatory condition that is the result of an autoimmune disorder. While autoimmune disorders are generally not service-related, the difference with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is that the cartilage breakdown associated with the rheumatoid form of this disease tends to happen suddenly within a year or two post-injury.

The VA considers rheumatoid arthritis to be a disabling condition. If you are diagnosed with this disease and are incapacitated as a result, you are generally provided with 100 percent disability, regardless of how many joints are affected. If you have experienced at least 2 episodes of incapacitation in a year, you will receive at least 20 percent disability. Three or more incapacitating episodes in a year will result in at least 40 percent disability, and four or more episodes or evidence of other symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, such as loss of appetite or anemia, will result in 60 percent disability.

Degenerative arthritis, however, is rated based on the loss of motion in each affected joint. To be rated at 10 percent, the sufferer must have X-ray evidence showing that two or more major joints or two or more minor joint groups are affected. To obtain a 20 percent disability rating, the sufferer must also be able to prove that the condition causes him or her to experience occasional incapacitating episodes. Some of the factors that must be present in order for disability compensation to be provided include:

  • Functional loss of the joint
  • Instability
  • Pain

Common Causes of Service-Related Arthritis

There are many service-related activities that can result in arthritis, including:

  • A traumatic injury such as a torn ACL that results in degenerative damage to the joint.
  • Overuse of the joints during the job you did in the service that resulted in painful motion or inflammation of the joint.
  • Poor posture or positioning for your service-related work that resulted in damage to the joints, such as spending many hours with your knees bent or hunched over your work task.

How is a Service Connection Established for Arthritis?

To establish a service connection for arthritis, a veteran must prove that the condition was a result of an event that occurred during service, such as an in-service injury or overuse of a joint during a service-related task that caused the condition to develop. It is important to note that the event that resulted in the condition does not have to be traumatic. It does, however, require a doctor’s opinion that the condition developed as a result of service-related activities.

There are two main types of arthritis that veterans can obtain disability compensation for: degenerative and rheumatoid.

Degenerative Arthritis

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, this form of arthritis, also known as osteoarthritis, is the most common primary reason for individuals to be discharged from active duty military service. Degenerative arthritis of the spine is the most common service-connected disability for which veterans receive disability compensation. Degenerative arthritis is a natural wearing down of the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of your bones. The condition results in pain, stiffness, limitation of motion, painful motion, and a grinding or clicking sound when the sufferer moves the affected joint.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

This type of arthritis is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the joints. This creates inflammation that causes the joints to swell, resulting in pain around the joints. The symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis include joint pain, tenderness, or swelling lasting six weeks or more; morning stiffness lasting at least 30 minutes; fatigue; loss of appetite; and a low-grade fever. If the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis go unchecked, the condition can result in damage to the joints and bones that can cause the joint to become unstable and result in loss of mobility.

Matthew  White

Experience

Appellate Attorney Matthew White represents veterans before the Board of Veterans Appeals and the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims.

Read More

Brendan Garcia

Experience

Owner and Lead Attorney Brendan Garcia represents veterans in all 50 states with their VA Disability Appeals, in all stages of the VA Appeals process.

Read More

Contact a VA Disability Lawyer Today

A VA Disability Lawyer’s role is to assist you throughout the confusing and often frustrating appeals process if you have been denied benefits for your service-connected arthritis. Generally, you need to be denied at least once before an attorney can assist, but once a lawyer is involved they will often be able to quickly determine what needs to be done in order to prove entitlement.

If your VA disability claim for arthritis has been denied, be sure to contact the VA Accredited Attorneys at VetLaw right away to help make sure you get the entitlement you deserve.

Contact Us Now

No Win, No Fee

Yes, the VA does consider arthritis to be a disability that would qualify for benefits as long as the arthritis is directly related to your service. The amount you can receive for arthritis will depend on the type of arthritis as well as the severity.

If your arthritis is due to a single injury, documentation of that injury will likely be enough to establish the connection. If the arthritis is degenerative, however, you will need to show a continuation of reported symptoms.

Your chances of winning a VA appeal after your claim has been denied depends on your case and how well your appeal is handled. In order to have the best chance at winning your appeal, it is always in your best interest to work with an experienced VA disability lawyer.

Sours: https://vet.law/va-disability-claims/physical-conditions/arthritis/

For osteoarthritis disability va

[gravityform id="1" title="true" description="true" ajax="true"]

[gravityform id="3" title="true" description="true"]

<div class='gf_browser_unknown gform_wrapper first-time-popup_wrapper gform_legacy_markup_wrapper' id='gform_wrapper_3' > <div class='gform_heading'> <h3 class="gform_title">Free Legal Consultation</h3> <span class='gform_description'>Fill out this form and we'll contact you.woodslawyers.com/getting-good-va-rating-for-arthritis/' /></div></li><li id="field_3_8" class="gfield gfield--width-full gform_hidden field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_text'><input name='input_8' id='input_3_8' type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' aria-invalid="false" value='' /></div></li><li id="field_3_9" class="gfield gform_validation_container field_sublabel_below field_description_below gfield_visibility_visible" ><label class='gfield_label' for='input_3_9' >Phone</label><div class='ginput_container'><input name='input_9' id='input_3_9' type='text' value='' autocomplete='new-password'/></div><div class='gfield_description' id='gfield_description_3_9'>This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.</div></li></ul></div> <div class='gform_footer top_label'> <input type='submit' id='gform_submit_button_3' class='gform_button button' value='Send Form' onclick='if(window["gf_submitting_3"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_3"]=true;} ' onkeypress='if( event.keyCode == 13 ){ if(window["gf_submitting_3"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_3")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_3"]=true;} jQuery("#gform_3").trigger("submit",[true]); }' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='is_submit_3' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_submit' value='3' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_unique_id' value='' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='state_3' value='WyJbXSIsImI4YmYyM2E3NWM0OGZhNzk3NmM4NDhhYTdjNTFiYTA0Il0=' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_target_page_number_3' id='gform_target_page_number_3' value='0' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_source_page_number_3' id='gform_source_page_number_3' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' name='gform_field_values' value='' /> </div> <p style="display: none !important;"><label>&#916;<textarea name="ak_hp_textarea" cols="45" rows="8" maxlength="100"></textarea></label><input type="hidden" id="ak_js" name="ak_js" value="40"/><script>document.getElementById( "ak_js" ).setAttribute( "value", ( new Date() ).getTime() );</script></p></form> </div>

[gravityform id="6" title="true" description="true"]

</label><div class='ginput_container ginput_container_textarea'><textarea name='input_4' id='input_6_4' class='textarea medium' placeholder='Tell us about your hearing problems from 3M earplugs.' aria-invalid="false" rows='10' cols='50'></textarea></div></li></ul></div> <div class='gform_footer top_label'> <input type='submit' id='gform_submit_button_6' class='gform_button button' value='Get Help Now' onclick='if(window["gf_submitting_6"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_6"]=true;} ' onkeypress='if( event.keyCode == 13 ){ if(window["gf_submitting_6"]){return false;} if( !jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity || jQuery("#gform_6")[0].checkValidity()){window["gf_submitting_6"]=true;} jQuery("#gform_6").trigger("submit",[true]); }' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='is_submit_6' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_submit' value='6' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_unique_id' value='' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='state_6' value='WyJbXSIsImI4YmYyM2E3NWM0OGZhNzk3NmM4NDhhYTdjNTFiYTA0Il0=' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_target_page_number_6' id='gform_target_page_number_6' value='0' /> <input type='hidden' class='gform_hidden' name='gform_source_page_number_6' id='gform_source_page_number_6' value='1' /> <input type='hidden' name='gform_field_values' value='' /> </div> <p style="display: none !important;"><label>&#916;<textarea name="ak_hp_textarea" cols="45" rows="8" maxlength="100"></textarea></label><input type="hidden" id="ak_js" name="ak_js" value="109"/><script>document.getElementById( "ak_js" ).setAttribute( "value", ( new Date() ).getTime() );</script></p></form> </div>

Sours: https://www.woodslawyers.com/getting-good-va-rating-for-arthritis/
Obesity and VA Disability Benefits

VA Disability Compensation for Osteoarthritis

Posted by Berry Law on May 30, 2020 in Arthritis

Veterans that have current disabilities that were a result of their military service are entitled to compensation, and there is a long list of disabilities that a Veteran could claim disability benefits for. One of the often-overlooked disability claims that a Veteran can file is for osteoarthritis. Veterans suffering from osteoarthritis may be eligible for disability benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

What is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and is defined by Mayo Clinic as a degenerative condition in which the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of your bones wears down over time. Once this cartilage reaches a certain point, symptoms such as pain, stiffness, loss of flexibility in the joint, tenderness and swelling, and bone spurs can occur.

While age is generally considered to be the biggest risk factor in the development of osteoarthritis, obesity, repeated stress on the joint, and injuries to the joint can all cause or aggravate arthritis.

Osteoarthritis and Veterans

What does this mean for Veterans? Military service often puts the body’s joints under repeated stress for long periods of time. Additionally, injuries to knees, ankles, shoulders, and other joints are common, but not always reported every time such an injury occurs. As the Mayo Clinic notes, “osteoarthritis symptoms often develop slowly and worsen over time.” This means that an injury which occurred in service may have caused osteoarthritis in a particular joint, even though the osteoarthritis was not discovered until years after discharge from the military.

While this information is not necessarily definitive in and of itself, it does provide a basis for asking your doctor or other medical professional for an opinion as to whether your osteoarthritis may have been caused by an injury in service. Remember, to establish service connection you must show three different things:

  1. A current medical diagnosis of your disability
  2. An event in service that led to your current disability/diagnosis
  3. A nexus linking the event to your disability. This usually comes in a statement from your doctor noting the condition is “at least as likely as not” caused by military service.

Each person’s situation is different, and your doctor or medical professional is best suited to determine whether your condition is related to service.

Veterans Benefits Attorneys

Many Veterans are suffering from disabilities caused by service. Unfortunately, they often find it difficult to receive an adequate VA disability rating for their injuries. If you have been denied disability benefits for osteoarthritis or any other disability, Berry Law may be able to help.

Our team has experience helping Veterans across the country appeal unfavorable rating decisions to receive the disability compensation they deserve. Contact Berry Law today to appeal the VA’s decision and take the next steps in receiving the full VA disability benefits you deserve.

Sours: https://ptsdlawyers.com/va-disability-osteoarthritis/

Similar news:

I'll hand it over to the police. He didn't insist. He burst into tears and was kneeling in front of my face.



650 651 652 653 654