First south park episode

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&#;South Park&#; First Episode: THR&#;s Review

On Aug. 13, , Comedy Central introduced South Park to America. The Hollywood Reporter&#;s original review of the first episode is below: 

Though the title makes South Park sound like a frothy soap, this new series from Comedy Central is anything but. It&#;s dismissible juvenilia — a collection of poorly paced, lowest-common-denominator setups that are not even sophomorically funny or scatologically goofy.

Based on The Spirit of Christmas — an animated short created by Matt Stone and Trey Parker for Brian Graden, a Foxlab executive who sent it out as a video Christmas card — South Park can safely be called ridiculous. We are party to the often vulgar (the show is rated TV-M) and idiotic escapades centering around a quartet of third-graders — Kyle, Kenny, Cartman and Stan — dwelling in the bizarre burg of South Park.

This hamlet, which takes as its inspiration the real Colorado city where reported sightings of UFOs are routine, is a way off-center town marked by weirdness and oddball behavior.

As for South Park&#;s kiddie protagonists, Stan is the Type A personality, Kyle the brains of the bunch but easily influenced, Cartman the fat boy who is the target of other kids&#; ridicule, and Kenny the poor kid who, as the Showtime press material tells us, &#;dies in every episode.&#;

Rendered in the wanting style of a cheesy, early &#;s cartoon, South Park is a witless offering that wants to score as it seeks to be pointedly outrageous and aggressively offensive but clocks in as merely dumb. — Miles Beller

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Sours: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/general-news/south-park-first-episode-thrs/

The 25 Greatest &#;South Park&#; Moments – Updated

Happy 20th birthday, South Park! Since its premiere on August 13th, , creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone have given the world singing excrement, stoned towels, a sensitive Satan, characters with names like Big Gay Al and Tweek Tweak, farting Canadian comedy duos and some of the most scabrous celebrity parodies imaginable. And two decades after Cartman&#;s first alien anal probe, the animators still refuse to play nice or tow anything even resembling P.C. line. How many shows do you know that could come up with something as biting as the &#;Memberberries&#; concept – one of the sharper takedowns of how a nostalgia-worshipping culture can slide into dodgy territory – much less in its 20th season?

A decade ago, we attempted to single out the 25 most memorable (and memorably jaw-dropping) highlights of the show. A lot has happened to Stan, Kyle, Cartman and the indestructible Kenny since then, however, so we&#;ve updated and substantially revised our old list – to paraphrase a wise man, respect our au-thor-i-tiiiie on this. These are our picks for the best South Park moments to date. It&#;s been a remarkably consistent middle finger to cultural propriety for the 20 years. It feels like it could keep flipping the world the bird for another 20 more.

Sours: https://www.rollingstone.com/tv/tv-lists/thegreatest-south-park-moments-updated/
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South Park

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Nominee:

  • South Park

    "Put It Down"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Directed by

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank C. Agnone II, Executive Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Jack Shih, Animation Producer

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Nominee:

  • South Park

    "Member Berries"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Directed by

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank Agnone, Executive Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Bill Hader, Producer

    Jack Shih, Animation Producer

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Nominee:

  • South Park

    "You're Not Yelping"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Directed by

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank Agnone, Executive Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Jack Shih, Animation Producer

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Nominee:

  • South Park

    "Freemium Isn't Free"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Directed by

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank Agnone, Executive Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Bill Hader, Producer

    Jack Shih, Animation Producer

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Nominee:

  • South Park

    "Black Friday"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Written by/Directed by

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank Agnone, Executive Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Bill Hader, Producer

    Jack Shih, Director of Animation

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Winner:

  • South Park

    "Raising The Bar"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Written by/Directed by

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank C. Agnone II, Supervising Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Jack Shih, Director of Animation

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Nominee:

  • South Park

    "Crack Baby Athletic Association"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Writer/Director

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank Agnone, Supervising Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Bill Hader, Producer

    Ryan Quincy, Animation Producer

    Jack Shih, Director of Animation

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program -
  • Nominee:

  • South Park

    "/"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Writer/Director

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank Agnone, Supervising Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Erica Rivinoja, Producer

    Ryan Quincy, Animation Producer

    Jack Shih, Director of Animation

    Jenny Yu, Director of Animation

Outstanding Animated Program (for programming less than one hour) -
  • Winner:

  • South Park

    "Margaritaville"

    Comedy Central

    Central Productions

    Trey Parker, Executive Producer/Writer/Director

    Matt Stone, Executive Producer

    Anne Garefino, Executive Producer

    Frank Agnone, Supervising Producer

    Eric Stough, Producer

    Adrien Beard, Producer

    Bruce Howell, Producer

    Erica Rivinoja, Producer

    Vernon Chatman, Producer

    Bill Hader, Producer

    Ryan Quincy, Director of Animation

Sours: https://www.emmys.com/shows/south-park
Reacting To My South Park Episode!

South Park: 10 Facts You Didn&#;t Know About The First Season

Comedy Central's South Parkhas become one of the most renowned animated sitcoms, thanks in large part to its goofy and often boundary-pushing style of humor. With such a zany and over-the-top show, it stands to reason that there's plenty of insanity and intrigue involved in the making of this cartoon.

RELATED: 10 Facts And Trivia You Never Knew About Kenny

This is especially the case in the show's debut season, which hadn't quite found its footing yet, and was assembled under somewhat crude conditions. Still, this sillier, more simplistic brand of South Park is part of Season 1's charm, as are the often-crazy conditions surrounding its creation. With that said, here are 10 interesting behind-the-scenes facts involving South Park's first season.

10 The Original Pilot Was Too Long For Syndicated TV

As one might expect with a brand new show, there are bound to be some hiccups born from inexperience. This was certainly the case with South Park's debut season. One example came in the form of the pilot episode's length, which was 28 minutes long rather than the required

This was because Parker and Stone had not considered the needed time allotted for commercial breaks, and thus ended up cutting several minutes worth of material from "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe." Extra scenes included more emphasis on Pip, which can later be seen in "An Elephant Makes Love to a Pig." Another includes the true origin of Cartman's flatulence, which was apparently from older kids feeding him hot tamales and not the alien probe in his butt.

9 The Pilot Was Made The Old Fashioned Way

South Park is known for its crude style of animation that resembles flat construction paper. Of course, this is all for stylistic effect but as it happens, the pilot was indeed animated using construction paper and other cheap art supplies.

Parker and Stone spent over three months in a small animation studio in Denver cobbling together various construction paper cutouts to create the first season's episodes. Literally thousands of frames were shot to assemble an entire episode, as pieces were moved and swapped out in stop-motion fashion. One can certainly understand why this format was ditched soon thereafter, as seen in the now more refined digital animation that modern South Park incorporates.

8 The Characters Talked Fast Because Of Imperfect Editing

Astute listeners might notice the pitch and speed of some of the South Park children's voices sound a bit different when their debut season is compared to later episodes. In order to make the adult voice actors sound like kids and give them more of a cartoony vibe,dialogue was sped up via editing and sound design software.

RELATED: 12 Most Outrageous South Park Moments

But during Season 1, this technique had not yet been perfected, nor had the speed and pitches of the voices been solidified. This led to a lot of vocal inconsistencies in the way characters talked, with some kids sounding faster than others while others had a noticeably unnaturally high pitch voice.

7 Lava & You Was Inspired By A Real-Life PSA

Taking the form of an old obscure reference, the Lava And You bit in "Volcano" is derived from a safety video played in various schools across America in the '50s and '60s.

During this post-war era, America was at the height of a nuclear scare. This set the stage for a rather cheesy (and not particularly helpful) video for school children, showing them how to prepare for the atomic bomb. Apparently, all they had to do to stay safe from nuclear fallout was to duck under a table. Parker and Stone satirized this with a similar Public Service Announcement (PSA) shown to the kids of South Park, informing them that ducking and covering will somehow save them from hot magma.

6 Mr. Hankey Was Created Before The Show Even Began

Most fans know of the amusingly crude animated short,The Spirit of Christmas, which was simply made as a Christmas card for a Fox executive. But the true origins of what became South Park can be traced all the way back to

Parker and Stone had met in a film class at the University of Colorado, and discussed filming a three-minute short involving a boy who befriends a talking piece of poo. This would become "Jesus VS Frosty," which would lay the foundation for the aforementioned The Spirit of Christmas. The talking poo, Mr. Hankey, would be one of the first supporting characters introduced in Season 1 (which began in ) and would become an icon of the show itself.

5 The Pilot Took Six Months To Complete

The pilot episode was a pretty laborious endeavor on the part of Parker and Stone, who opted for old school, stop-motion way of animating. So it's perhaps understandable that the animators opted to "cut corners" whenever possible.

Characters not engaged in major actions or speaking roles can often be seen completely still in the background. This was done to save time on animation, as fewer pieces would be swapped out. Interestingly enough, even with this minimalistic style, the entire production of the pilot episode still took six whole months to finish.

4 Death Was Inspired By A Doodle

While it may not have the iconic status that some of Season 1's episodes have, "Death" is still significant when it comes to South Park history.

RELATED: 10 Facts And Trivia You Never Knew About South Park

The Grim Reaper featured in the episode is actually inspired by Trey Parker's tendency to sketch cartoon images of Death riding a tricycle. This is why in the episode, Death is randomly riding around a tricycle while chasing the boys through the streets.

3 A Violent Shelly Scene Was Deleted Due To Concerns Of Backlash

Fans might remember the scene in "An Elephant Makes Love to a Pig," which shows Stan lying on a puddle of water as he tells Shelly that she'll regret beating him. While this looks like a normal occurrence by the show's crass standards, the beating wasn't actually shown. As it turns out, Shelly beating up Stan (and any context for the joke) was indeed cut out.

Originally, Shelly had set Stan on fire the second time she beats him up, prompting this response. The showrunners excised the scene so that the show wouldn't get heat for displaying dangerous acts being performed on and by minors, like what often happened on MTV's Beavis and Butt-Head.

2 Unlikely Celebrity Voices Voiced The Animals

The inclusion of celebrity voices has long been a popular practice when it comes to cartoons. Parker and Stone being who they are, they decided to implement this in their own show but with one amusing twist.

In the show's first season, they had sought to secure a lineup of big-name celebrities that would slot into various episodes. The kicker? They would play the absolute silliest, most minuscule roles. This included George Clooney as Stan's dog Sparky, and Jay Leno as Cartman's cat. Apparently, Jerry Seinfeld was tapped to voice a turkey, but had second thoughts and turned down the offer.

1 An Animator's Hand Makes A Surprise Cameo

The rather unrefined nature of South Park's pilot episode really takes the spotlight in a scene where Chef sings to the kids in the school cafeteria. At the beginning of his trademarked song about passionate lovemaking, a brief flash of a left hand can be seen on the left side of the frame, seemingly assembling part of Chef or tilting his head for the next shot.

It flashes by so quickly that viewers are likely to miss it if they blink at the wrong time. In any other show, this would be a cause for panic but in South Park's case, it just adds to the first season's ragtag charm.

NEXT: South Park: 10 Of The Most Action-Packed Episodes Ever

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About The Author
Stephen Lagioia ( Articles Published)

Stephen is an avid Nintendo, Indie, and retro gamer who dabbles in Xbox on occasion, mainly in the form of binge sessions of Overwatch. He's a history buff, an aspiring writer of short fiction, and a devout metalhead who enjoys poorly drumming along to Black Sabbath on his cheap drum set. When his beloved Chicago Cubs or Bulls are not playing, he typically likes to watch random documentaries or campy horror films.

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Sours: https://screenrant.com/south-park-seasonfacts-didnt-know/

South episode first park

Modest Beginnings ( to early s)

Two decades after premiering, South Park has left an indelible mark of satire, surrealism, and insanity. Creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker’s often controversial cartoon first aired on Comedy Central on August 13, South Park’s pilot, “Cartman Gets an Anal Probe,” leaned into its crude animation and limited budget, propelling Comedy Central into the cable TV power player that it is today. Its popularity grew steadily, prompting the show’s only theatrically released film to date, South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut, in It remained the highest grossing R-rated animated film until and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Stone and Parker have had other successes, namely the film Team America: World Police and the Tony-winning musical The Book of Mormon, but twenty seasons of South Park remain their most significant imprint on popular culture.

Their methods of storytelling have evolved significantly over the years, but even the newest of episodes remain just as relevant and funny as any before them. In recognition of their platinum anniversary (and for season twenty-one, premiering on September 13), here is a brief history of the forces behind the timeliness, irreverence, and hilarity of South Park.

The origin of South Park intersects with the origins of the viral video. In , Matt Stone and Trey Parker created “Jesus vs. Frosty,” a stop-motion animation video where four unsuspecting boys create a monstrous snowman that, of course, kills Kenny. Three years later, they created a sequel, “Jesus vs. Santa,” which features a full-on brawl between the two Christmas icons, as well as a typical dose of childish anti-antisemitism from Cartman toward Kyle. Not all the character traits and town details that we’d see later on were figured out here, but the essence of what would become South Park is on full display in these two shorts. Network executives and celebrities passed around VHS copies of the shorts and the soon-to-be South Park creations were a massive industry hit.

After Fox passed on the show, Stone and Parker shopped around at MTV and Comedy Central, ultimately entering into a deal with the latter in As season one went into development, hand-cut animation was replaced with computer animation, but great care was taken to make sure the new animation style emulated the show’s humble origins. In comparison to later episodes, the first few seasons are tame. But let me be clear: they are tame only for South Park. In any other context, episodes like “Conjoined Fetus Lady” and “Merry Christmas, Charlie Manson!” would be about as crazy as they come.

Even the earliest episodes only took around three months to produce, which is very quick for an animated show, as most take between eight months and a year for a single episode. But, impressively enough, as South Park further developed, production times would only continue to decrease.

After two or three seasons into the show’s production (the actual time was never specified), South Park’s creative team realized that they were able to produce an episode in only six days. This expediency, however stressful, allowed South Park to comment on pop culture and news events more quickly and sharply than any of its animated peers. In essence, they doubled-down on producer Dick Wolf’s “ripped from the headlines” philosophy as seen in the Law & Order franchise. (This manic production process can be seen in the Emmy-nominated documentary 6 Days to Air.)And so, while other animated shows took months to produce an episode, South Park lampooned and dissected The Passion of the Christ, Bush-era border-security increases, the Terri Schiavo case, and more in real time.

Aside from containing a more than healthy dose of adolescent humor, South Park’s often brilliant storytelling is as funny as it is because of its writing style. As Trey Parker reveals in 6 Days to Air:

I always call it the rule of replacing “ands” with either “buts” or “therefores” … It’s always like “This happens, and then this happens, and then this happens.” Whenever I can go back in the writing and change that to “This happens. Therefore, this happens, BUT this happens…” it makes for better writing.

This dynamic pattern of storytelling is evident in many of South Park’s episodes, whether they tell self-contained stories or connect to larger arcs. It is the biggest reason why its commentary can be as biting and expansive as it is in just over twenty minutes an episode across two or three plots. It also accounts for the clever ways South Park’s A, B, and sometimes C plots intersect and weave around one another. Often an episode will have more than one story line going on simultaneously, usually one with the kids, one with their parents, and another with a “guest star” character (like the Sony Corporation, a hoard of zombies, NASA scientists, or Barbra Streisand.)

The breakneck pace of writing these episodes gives humor to the resolutions of these plots in how quickly they can end or solve themselves. Faster writing also lends itself best to simpler stories and settings, allowing jokes to flow from character interaction instead of confusing plot elements. That being said, many of South Park’s best episodes come from simple ideas ballooning into global disasters. Too many Peruvian pan flute players at the downtown mall? In South Park, you can be sure that they’re connected to a supernatural, apocalyptic pandemic of guinea pigs.

For season eighteen, South Park’s creators took the show in a different structural direction. They had aired multipart stories in the past (i.e. Imaginationland, Game of Thrones parody, and “Coon and Friends” trilogies), but the majority of episodes could be watched in any order and had little connection to one another. This is called episodic storytelling and it works best for sitcoms and other shows meant for syndication. After seventeen seasons, South Park transitioned into serial storytelling, where the viewer would need to watch a whole season in order to follow the overarching plot. This proved challenging to do with the show’s “6 days to air” production method, but the show’s stories remained timely regardless of any changes behind the scenes. In fact, after building up to the election over two seasons (and prematurely anticipating a Clinton win), Stone and Parker scrambled to rewrite their post-election episode to include a Trump victory.

While season eighteen’s serial story line simply had each episode’s individual plot lead into the next, seasons nineteen and twenty tackled larger themes over their runs, like political correctness, Internet trolling, and the dangers of nostalgia. To get the full picture, watching whole seasons in order was now a necessity. This shift does have its pros and cons, but it personally increased my interest and investment in the show. Season nineteen’s serial structure pushed me to watch each show as it aired, which I had not done with any previous seasons. Now, more than ever before, I’m eagerly awaiting the next season.

Where will South Park go from here? What kind of narrative will season twenty-one have? There’s truly only one way to find out, though that may involve stopping over in a familiar, quiet little Colorado mountain town…

Jonathan Hazin is interning in the curatorial department at The Paley Center for Media this summer. Jonathan is a rising sophomore at Vassar College, studying Film and Spanish. In his spare time, he likes to read about films, write about films, and make low quality films.

Sours: https://paleymatters.org/years-of-south-park-a-raunchy-retrospective-d15eb0
Cartman Refuses to Get Vaccinated - SOUTH PARK

South Park (season 1)

Season of television series

Season of television series

South Park
A gray box contains four crudely drawn cartoon children waving their hands. They have big round heads and wear colorful winter clothes. Behind them is "SOUTH PARK" in big letters, and below them is "THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON".

DVD cover

Country of originUnited States
No. of episodes13
Original networkComedy Central
Original releaseAugust 13, &#;()&#;–
February 25, &#;()

Next&#;→
Season 2

List of episodes

The first season of the animated television series South Park ran for 13 episodes from August 13, to February 25, on the American network Comedy Central.[1] The creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone wrote most of the season's episodes; Dan Sterling, Philip Stark and David Goodman were credited with writing five episodes. The narrative revolves around four children—Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, Eric Cartman and Kenny McCormick—and their unusual experiences in the titular mountain town.

South Park originated from Parker and Stone's animated short, Jesus vs. Frosty. The low-budget, crudely made film featured prototypes of South Park's main characters and was followed in by another short film, Jesus vs. Santa, which became popular and was widely shared over the Internet. The short's popularity caused Parker and Stone to develop a series based on it, and the project was first considered for purchase by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Fox ultimately passed on the show, and Comedy Central signed on to produce the series instead. South Park debuted on August 13, on Comedy Central with an initial run of six episodes; due to its success, an additional seven episodes were quickly produced. The complete season was released on DVD in November

The first season was a ratings success for Comedy Central. The Nielsen ratings rose from to from the first to the tenth episode. Several episodes received award nominations, including for a Emmy Award in the "Outstanding Animated Program (for Programming Less Than One Hour)" and a GLAAD Award in the "Outstanding TV&#;– Individual Episode" category for the episode "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride". During the season, South Park won a CableACE Award for "Best Animated Series" and was nominated for a Annie Award in the "Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Primetime or Late Night Television Program".

The show was a financial success for Comedy Central and helped the network transform into "a cable industry power almost overnight".[2] Despite this, critics gave the season mixed reviews. Parents Television Council rated it so offensive that it "shouldn't have been made": "it doesn't just push the envelope; it knocks it off the table",[3] while another critic thought of it as "coming pretty damn close" to being a "perfect" television series season.[4]

Voice cast[edit]

Main cast[edit]

  • Trey Parker as Stan Marsh, Eric Cartman, Randy Marsh, Mr. Garrison, Clyde Donovan, Mr. Hankey, Mr. Mackey, Stephen Stotch, Jimmy Valmer, Timmy Burch and Phillip.
  • Matt Stone as Kyle Broflovski, Kenny McCormick, Butters Stotch, Gerald Broflovski, Stuart McCormick, Craig Tucker, Jimbo Kern, Terrance, Tweek Tweak, Pip Pirrup and Jesus.
  • Mary Kay Bergman as Liane Cartman, Sheila Broflovski, Shelly Marsh, Sharon Marsh, Mrs. McCormick and Wendy Testaburger.
  • Isaac Hayes as Chef

Guest cast[edit]

Episodes[edit]

See also: List of South Park episodes

Development[edit]

The idea for South Park originated in when creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone met in a film class as students at the University of Colorado. They discussed filming a three-minute short film involving a boy who befriended a talking piece of feces named Mr. Hankey. Although such a short was never made, Parker and Stone created a Christmas-related animated short commonly known as "Jesus vs. Frosty". The crude, low-budget animation featured prototypes for the main characters of South Park, including Cartman, Stan and Kyle. Fox Broadcasting Company executive Brian Graden saw the film and in sent a check of $1, to Parker and Stone asking them to create a second short film that he could send to his friends as a Christmas video card. Titled The Spirit of Christmas, but also known as "Jesus vs. Santa", the short resembled the style of the later series more closely.[17] In , The Spirit of Christmas won the Los Angeles Films Critics Association award for "Best Animation", thus further bringing the two filmmakers to the attention of industry representatives.[18]

The "Jesus vs. Santa" video was widely copied and shared over the Internet. George Clooney was reported to have made copies for his friends, and the short was subsequently regarded as likely the first viral video.[2] The popularity of the short led to Parker and Stone to develop an adult-animated show concept with four children as main protagonists and the fictional town of South Park in the ColoradoRocky Mountains. Through Graden, the duo persuaded Fox to buy their series due to its reputation with primetime edgier shows such as Cops, The Simpsons, and The X-Files. Fox set up a meeting at its office in Century City to discuss with Parker and Stone on how the show would proceed. It did not go well; Fox hated Mr. Hankey being included in the show, as they felt a talking stool character would not fly well with its viewers. Parker and Stone refused to honor Fox's requests to remove the character and completely severed ties with the network as a result.[19][20][21]

Later, Comedy Central executive Doug Herzog saw the Jesus vs. Santa short and considered it to be "literally the funniest thing [he]'d ever seen," and requested Parker and Stone to develop a show for his network.[2] During the negotiations, Parker and Stone brought up the idea of a Mr. Hankey episode, with Parker claiming to have asked that "one thing we have to know before we really go any further: how do you feel about talking poo?" The network's executives were receptive to the idea,[22] which would be one of the main reasons Parker and Stone decided to sign on with the channel. The first episode of the series, "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe", debuted on Comedy Central on August 13, , while Mr. Hankey debuted a few months later in the ninth episode, "Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo".

The pilot episode received poor results from test audiences. Parker later conceded that regarding the language, he and Stone felt pressure to live up to their previous two shorts and "tried to push things&#; maybe further than we should [have]."[24] In contrast, they allowed subsequent episodes to "be more natural",[25] focusing more on making fun of topics considered taboo "without just throwing a bunch of dirty words in there."[24] After the poor results from the test audience, Comedy Central executives were unsure whether they wanted to order additional episodes after "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe". However, when buzz began to generate on the Internet about the two original shorts, the network commissioned Parker and Stone to write one more episode without committing to a full series until they had seen the script. While working on the film Orgazmo, Parker and Stone wrote the script for what would later become the episode "Weight Gain ". The duo sought to give Comedy Central executives an idea of how the series would be and how each episode could differ from the others. The network liked the script, and when Parker and Stone refused to write another script before signing off on at least six episodes, the executives agreed to commit to a series.

Comedy Central originally ordered only these six episodes, but when the show proved successful, they requested an additional seven, which Parker and Stone had to produce quickly. "Pinkeye", the first of these new episodes, would air on October 29, , only two and a half months after the show's premiere.[26][27] There were three holiday episodes—"Pinkeye", "Starvin' Marvin" and "Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo"—which aired at intervals of three weeks, while the remaining four aired later in February [28]

"Cartman Gets an Anal Probe" was the only episode animated almost completely with traditional cut paper, stop-motion animation techniques.[29] All subsequent episodes would be fully computer-animated using Power Animator or Maya.[30] By the eighth episode, "Damien", much of the drawing and animation responsibilities handled by Parker and Stone were now being delegated to a team of animators.[31] This would be the only episode aside from "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe" to receive a TV (unsuitable for children under the age of 14) rating instead of the show's customary TV-MA (unsuitable for under the age of 17).[32] Parker and Stone credit the fourth episode, "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride", with helping to raise the ratings during the early part of the season. They felt that the show's first official Christmas special, "Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo", brought South Park to a new level of popularity, and Parker said this episode "just vaulted everything."

Reception[edit]

Ratings[edit]

South Park's first season was a ratings success for Comedy Central.[6] "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe" earned a Nielsen rating of , translating to , viewers, which was considered high for a cable program in the United States at the time.[6] It increased slightly by the third episode, "Volcano", and by the sixth episode, "Death", the show had reached a rating of [6] The ratings continued to rise rapidly from then on, to ("Pinkeye"), ("Starvin' Marvin'"), ("Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo"), ("Damien"), and ("Mecha-Streisand") respectively.[6] This corresponded to an increase to &#;million viewers in &#;million households.[11][12] The season finale, "Cartman's Mom is a Dirty Slut", received a Nielsen rating in the range[33] and gained over , viewers when first aired in Canada in August [34][35]

South Park became one of the first television series to be bootlegged via the Internet, just as The Spirit of Christmas had been before it. College students digitized many episodes from the first season and streamed them online for friends who were unable to receive Comedy Central.[36]

Critics[edit]

Despite high ratings, reviews from television critics for the season were mixed. Both The Washington Post and The New York Times had three articles mentioning the show, usually in terms of "class-based taste arguments."[18] "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe", the first episode of the series, received generally negative reviews after airing. Brent Bozell, founder and then-president of the Parents Television Council, gave an unfavorable review to the episode, stating that the show "is so offensive that it shouldn't have been made. It doesn't just push the envelope; it knocks it off the table."[3] Bruce Fretts of Entertainment Weekly thought poorly of the writing and characters, lampooning that "if only the kids' jokes were as fresh as their mouths" and that "it might help if the South Park kids had personalities, but they're as one-dimensional as the show's cut-and-paste animation."[37] Calling the series "sophomoric, gross, and unfunny," Hal Boedeker of the Orlando Sentinel reckoned that the episode made "such a bad impression that it's hard to get on the show's strange wavelength."[38] Tom Shales of The Washington Post considered that "most of the alleged humor on the premiere is self-conscious and self-congratulatory in its vulgarity: flatulence jokes, repeated use of the word 'dildo' (in the literal as well as pejorative sense), and a general air of malicious unpleasantness."[2]

When "Weight Gain " aired, many writers in the mainstream media were still debating the longevity and the overall quality of South Park. With the series still in its earliest stages, the episode continued to shock many due to the characters frequent use of profanities.[39] Nevertheless, several reviewers felt "Weight Gain " was a significant improvement over "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe" and felt that it went in a much more satirical direction.[40][41] Several media outlets described the fifth episode of the season, "An Elephant Makes Love to a Pig", as one of the most popular early episodes.[42][43][44] Tom Carson of Newsday said it was the most outrageous South Park episode until "Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo" aired three months later.[45] Many reviewers also said this mere title demonstrated the crudeness and originality of South Park.[46][47]

Due to its impact, South Park made the cover of Rolling Stone in February ,[48] and of Newsweek in March [49] It was discussed in five different New York Times articles in [18] Franck Rich of The New York Times mentions the show's "ability to engage political topics with far more success than other (more obviously political) shows" and considered that the show "is hilariously candid about faith, family and death as well" and "is neither politically correct nor incorrect; it's on a different, post-ideological comic map altogether."[50] In , Jeremy Conrad of IGN wrote in a DVD review that it is rare when a television season is "perfect", but "the first season of South Park comes pretty damn close" and that "almost every single episode in this three-disc set is a classic and each is still funny as hell even after so many viewings over the years."[4]

In , scholar Stephen Groening argued that the show appeared as part of a reaction to the culture wars of the s and s in the United States, in which issues such as Murphy Brown's motherhood, Tinky Winky's sexuality, and The Simpsons' family values were extensively debated. The culture wars, and political correctness in particular, were driven by the belief that relativism was becoming more relevant to daily life. Groening explained that South Park "made a name for itself as rude, crude, vulgar, offensive, and potentially dangerous". Its critics argued that the Stan, Kyle, Cartman and Kenny were poor role models for children while its supporters celebrated the show's defense of free speech.[51]

Impact on Comedy Central[edit]

In , Devin Leonard of Fortune regarded that the launch of South Park transformed Comedy Central from a "not-so-funny" network to "a cable industry power almost overnight."[2] The impact the show had ended up surprising everybody involved.[2] At the time, the cable network had a low distribution of just 21 million subscribers.[18] Comedy Central marketed the show aggressively before its launch, billing it as "that's why they invented the V-chip." The resulting buzz led to the network earning an estimated $30 million in T-shirts sales alone before the first episode was even aired.[18]

South Park became immediately one of the most popular shows on cable television, averaging consistently between and million viewers.[18] The Denver-based Tele-Communications Inc., the largest cable operator in the U.S. at the time, had just dropped Comedy Central, but when South Park debuted, Denver newspapers and radio stations heavily criticized the operator for not carrying the hit show of the two local filmmakers—Parker and Stone.[2] Doug Herzog, Comedy Central's president at the time, said that the public "went nuts" as the network received about ten million new subscriptions through Tele-Communications Inc. alone, "which at that time was unheard of."[2]

An affiliate of the MTV Network until then, Comedy Central decided, in part due to the success of South Park, to have its own independent sales department.[52] By the end of , Comedy Central had sold more than $ million worth of merchandise for the show, including T-shirts and dolls.[12] Over the next few years, Comedy Central's viewership spiked largely due to South Park, adding 3 million new subscribers in the first half of alone and allowed the network to sign international deals with networks in several countries.[18]

Awards[edit]

Some episodes of the first season received nominations for several entertainment awards. The season's fourth episode "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride" was nominated for an Emmy Award in in the "Outstanding Animated Program (for Programming Less Than One Hour)" category[7] but lost to The Simpsons episode "Trash of the Titans".[53] The same episode was also nominated for a GLAAD Award in the "Outstanding TV&#;– Individual Episode" category[54] but lost to another The Simpsons episode, "Homer's Phobia".[55] "Volcano", the season's third episode, was nominated for an Environmental Media Award in the "TV Episodic Comedy" category[56] but ended up losing to another The Simpsons episode, "The Old Man & the Lisa".[57][58]

During the series first season, South Park won a CableACE Award for "Best Animated Program or Series"[59] and was nominated for an Annie Award in the "Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Primetime or Late Night Television Program" category.[60] In , the two creators of the show Matt Stone and Trey Parker won the "Nova Award" given by the Producers Guild of America for the most promising producers in television.[61][62]

Home media[edit]

South Park – The Complete First Season[63][64]
DVD Set Details
  • 13 Episodes
  • 3-disc Set
  • Aspect Ratio
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • English (Dolby Digital )
Special Features[65]
  • Episode introductions by Trey Parker and Matt Stone
  • Cartman "O Holy Night" video
  • Ned "O Little Town Of Bethlehem" video
  • Four original television promos
  • "A South Park Thanksgiving" featured exclusively on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno
  • The four boys presenting at the CableACE Awards
Release Dates[66][67][68]
Region 1Region 2 Region 4
November 12, October 22, October 4,

Six episodes—"Cartman Gets an Anal Probe", "Weight Gain ", "Volcano", "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride", "An Elephant Makes Love to a Pig" and "Death"—were released in a three-VHS set on May 5, , marking the first time South Park was made available on video.[69] The first DVD releases came later that year, when the first Thirteen episodes were released by Warner Home Video on October 27 on the compilation collections South Park, Volume 1,[70]Volume 2[71] and Volume 3.[72] The last episode of the season "Cartman's Mom Is a Dirty Slut" was released on the South Park, Volume 4 on December 14, [73]

South Park – The Complete First Season was originally released by Warner Home Video as a three-disc region 1 DVD box set in the U.S. on November 12, and received an MA rating.[66][74] The season was re-released on June 29, by Paramount Home Entertainment. The DVD releases featured bonus material such as introductions for each episode, two Christmas carols by Eric Cartman and Ned, a short clip featuring Jay Leno and another clip in which the four boys present at the CableACE Awards. Trey Parker and Matt Stone produced commentaries for each episode but requested they be pulled off altogether when they found out the commentaries would be edited. Instead, the commentaries were released unedited by Comedy Central on a set of five CDs.[65] In October , South Park: Complete Series 1 was released in Australia[68] and with a 15 rating in region 2.[67] "Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo" was released again on November 13, on the compilation DVD Christmas Time in South Park.[75]

The distribution licenses for six episodes of the South Park's first season ("Volcano", "An Elephant Makes Love to a Pig", "Pinkeye", "Damien", "Starvin' Marvin" and "Mecha-Streisand") were purchased in by the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based company and website SightSound.com. The site made the episodes available for download for $ for a two-day copy and for $ for a permanent copy. It was one of the first experiments with downloadable television videos, thus making South Park one of the first shows legally obtainable on the Internet.[76][77] In March , Comedy Central made the first season's episodes as well as almost all other South Park episodes available for legal streaming on the South Park Studios website from within U.S.,[78] and later from within Canada[79] and the United Kingdom.[80]

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External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Park_(season_1)

You will also be interested:

The Ringer’s Top 40 Episodes of ‘South Park,’ Ranked

It’s all there in the opening scene of the first episode of South Park. After the brief theme song performed by Primus and a gonzo credit sequence, we’re introduced to four crudely animated third-graders—Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, Kenny McCormick, and, of course, the demagogue child-tyrant Eric Cartman—as they sing “School Days,” an innocent song from about an older couple looking back on their youth. They’re interrupted by Kyle’s brother Ike, whom Cartman calls a dildo. “What’s a dildo?” Stan asks. The boys—with the possible exception of Kenny, who’s muffled by his trademark orange hood—have no answers. But it doesn’t stop them from throwing the word around.

In the nearly 23 years since that pilot debuted on Comedy Central in August , additional episodes of South Park have aired, most blending the pure and profane in a way foreshadowed by that opening minute. (Of course, the episode’s title, “Cartman Gets an Anal Probe,” also signaled much of what was to come.) The children are our eyes into the bizarre, titular Colorado town, which series creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone use to dissect the world we live in. They’re often the smartest people in a reactionary town frequently visited by vapid celebrities. But they’re just 10 years old, and South Park consistently reminds us of that, whether it’s through their love of World of Warcraft, or Stan getting his heart broken for the first time, or their inability to understand words best suited for the bedroom.

South Park, however, aims to be more than kids being kids and unearthing new obscenities (though that was certainly a large part of its early appeal). The show has been praised and condemned in equal part for its handling of current events and social issues ranging from Scientology to China to Osama bin Laden to virtually anything that’s appeared in the headlines in the past two decades. That’s a result of the show’s famously nimble approach, which allows it to produce some episodes in as quickly as three or four days. Seemingly no one and nothing has been exempt from Parker and Stone’s sometimes savage satire. Look no further than the Season 9 episode “Best Friends Forever” to see their nihilistic views on display: After Kenny’s umpteenth death sparks a right-to-die debate that echoed the Terri Schiavo case—the episode aired hours before Schiavo passed away—Kyle declares “Cartman’s side is right, for the wrong reasons. But we’re wrong, for the right reasons.” In Parker and Stone’s world, everyone has a point, or perhaps no one has one at all. It’s not surprising that Stone once said, “I hate conservatives, but I really fucking hate liberals.”

That approach has not been without controversy. The show has handled gender issues clumsily since the boys’ teacher, Mrs. Garrison, transitioned early in the show’s run, and mocked trans athletes as recently as Eric Cartman is racist and xenophobic to his core, and while his ignorance is supposed to be the butt of the joke in many cases, writers dating back to David Margolis in have argued the popular character has helped normalize anti-Semitism. South Park as a whole has never been adept at addressing racial issues—the fictional town’s lone Black student is named Token Black, and that’s just one of the show’s many offenses. That isn’t to say that Parker and Stone haven’t successfully walked a fine line on sensitive issues on occasion, however: The Season 11 episode “With Apologies to Jesse Jackson,” which was made in response to comedian Michael Richards shouting racial epithets at Black hecklers, featured 42 uncensored uses of the N-word. “With Apologies” was later praised by the NAACP-connected group Abolish the “N” Word, whose cofounder said, “This show, in its own comedic way, is helping to educate people about the power of this word and how it feels to have hate language directed at you.”

On June 24, every episode of South Park arrives on HBO Max, with its warts, genius, and all else that comes with it. Revisiting now is sometimes uncomfortable, and occasionally revelatory. It still features the juvenile jokes that slayed teenagers, the high-brow plots that blew the college kids’ minds, and, at its center, the four precocious boys that so many fell in love with when it debuted in the late ’90s. To mark the occasion, The Ringer has ranked our top 40 episodes of South Park. We’ll do our best to not use the word “dildo” again. —Justin Sayles


“You Have 0 Friends” (Season 14, Episode 4)

This episode premiered in , way before Facebook was helping to convince your dumb uncle that government shadow elites are secretly using alien technology from another dimension to remotely lobotomize registered AARP members. There was a time when Facebook was simply annoying, and the pressure to begin living your life online hit communities across America like a tidal wave. In this episode, Stan reluctantly succumbs to that pressure, simply to placate the people in his life. All of a sudden, everyone around him begins oversharing inane personal tidbits and demanding daily positive affirmations in the form of likes, comments, and even pokes. Human interactions become commoditized and digital personae become inextricably linked with IRL selves. In addition to being a rather prophetic episode, “You Have 0 Friends” is also really funny. Cartman hosts a Mad Money ripoff TV show that charts the value of Facebook users as if they’re merely stock shares that can be easily jettisoned without remorse. Randy Marsh awkwardly confronts Stan, asking why he hasn’t friended his own father. When Stan gets fed up and tries to delete Facebook, he gets “sucked into Facebook,” a digital realm resembling Tron if it were somehow even less welcoming. There’s an unfortunate amount of South Park that hasn’t aged well ,,, but “You Have 0 Friends” hasn’t lost a step. —Matt James

“AWESOM-O” (Season 8, Episode 5)

What starts as another prank played on Butters turns into a nightmare for Cartman. The idea was simple: dress up as a robot called Awesom-O , befriend Butters, and trick him into revealing his deepest secrets. It starts off great, until Butters lets slip that he has a video of Cartman dressed up as Britney Spears kissing a cardboard cutout of Justin Timberlake. Fearful this could get out, Cartman begins spending every waking minute with Butters, who really believes Awesom-O is an actual robot. On a trip to Los Angeles, a starved Cartman is somehow roped into pitching movies to a studio, and those ideas result in hundreds of new Adam Sandler films. The government gets word of this and kidnaps Awesom-O to reprogram it as a weapon. Eventually the jig is up, all because Cartman farted and robots technically don’t fart. It’s one of Cartman’s most ridiculous pranks, and while it might not have been the most successful, it did give us Puppy Love, a movie where Adam Sandler falls in love with a girl but the girl is actually a golden retriever. —Sean Yoo

“Raisins” (Season 7, Episode 14)

After Wendy breaks up with Stan, the boys take him to a juvenile Hooters-like restaurant called Raisins, and while I’ve never been inside a Hooters—apparently, they serve great wings—I trust that the writers of South Park captured the full experience with a sports bar atmosphere and heavily made-up waitresses, who utter what one can only assume is the company line: “I’m so glad you guys came in—everyone in here is such a loser, but you guys seem really cool.” From there, Butters becomes infatuated with Raisins waitress Lexus, while Stan falls deeper into his post-breakup depression and joins the goth kids. But beneath the ridiculous, somewhat uncomfortable Hooters gag, there’s true emotion in this episode—an understanding that’s relatable to anyone who’s ever experienced the intense emotions that follow a breakup or unrequited love. While trite, the exchange between Stan and Butters toward the end ties the perfect bow on another lovingly absurd episode of South Park:

Stan: Huh? But you just got dumped!

Butters: Well, yeah, and I’m sad, but at the same time, I’m really happy that something could make me feel that sad. It’s like, it makes me feel alive, you know? It makes me feel human. The only way I could feel this sad now is if I felt something really good before. So, I have to take the bad with the good. So I guess what I feel is, like, a beautiful sadness.

Amelia Wedemeyer

“Night of the Living Homeless” (Season 11, Episode 7)

South Park doesn’t punch down as much as it punches in every direction. In this Night of the Living Dead parody, the town’s growing homeless population is occasionally the subject of the joke—a running gag has Cartman wanting to jump a few homeless people on his skateboard—but the real digs are aimed at the town’s residents, who are frightened by the sudden influx of beggars. The episode begins with the town council trying to figure out how to make use of the homeless (Randy suggests using them for tires, which isn’t too far off what some communities have tried to do in the not-so-distant past). Before long, the residents are unable to do anything, frozen by guilt and unable to maneuver through the hordes of people who have overrun the streets and public places. The boys eventually visit the neighboring town of Evergreen—which, it turns out, successfully ended its homeless problem by convincing its beggars to move to South Park. That gives the fourth-graders an idea: The way to reclaim the town is to convince the homeless to make their way to the Los Angeles area. The plan works (thanks to a modified version of “California Love”), and the residents of South Park rejoice. The homeless are out of sight and out of mind, and the town can get back to business as usual, but that ignorance-is-bliss approach may be one of the show’s most damning indictments of all. —Sayles

“The List” (Season 11, Episode 14)

This is one of the most underrated South Park episodes, in my humble opinion. When the girls create a list ranking the hottest boys in school, Kyle gets depressed when he discovers he’s been voted the ugliest. What seems like your standard elementary school kiddy drama slowly turns into a political story about corruption and lies as Stan and Wendy investigate the truth of the voting process within the Pleases and Sparkles Committee. When Stan and Wendy finally discover the truth and explain it to Kyle, Bebe appears … with a gun. —Jason Gallagher

“Fat Butt and Pancake Head” (Season 7, Episode 5)

The absurdity and downright brazenness that gives South Park its reputation is on full display in “Fat Butt and Pancake Head,” the Season 7 episode that viciously parodies onetime celebrity megacouple Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck. Cartman dresses his hand up as Jennifer Lopez for a cultural diversity day presentation, and performs what is essentially an offensive ventriloquist act, much to the chagrin of Kyle, who has spent weeks preparing for his own, more appropriate presentation on Latinx culture. As expected, Cartman comes out victorious over Kyle, and is awarded a gift certificate to the mall, which he spends on a music video for his hand dressed as Jennifer Lopez. Eventually, Cartman’s hand replaces the real Jennifer Lopez, both careerwise and in her relationship with a dumb, lovesick Ben Affleck. However, the real magic of this episode occurs within the last few moments, when it’s revealed that Cartman’s hand was never another Jennifer Lopez, but instead a drifter named Mitch Conner. Fitting to the entire plot, this animated deus ex machina is absolutely nonsensical, but it’s also one of the funniest endings in the show’s history. —Wedemeyer

“Cancelled” (Season 7, Episode 1)

A few months ago, I was watching America’s Next Top Model. What a show. Just pure reality TV cooked up in a mad genius’s lab (probably Tyra’s). Every element of that show is done up to the absolute most, to the point that contestants end up looking like a bad imitation of actual humans. Watch literally any episode and you’ll see what I mean. So there I was, watching trashy television, thinking to myself, “These people honestly are acting like aliens. What if we’re in a reality show for aliens, man?” It was my great idea, my million-dollar script. Fast-forward a few weeks and Ringer editor Justin Sayles asks me to write about South Park episodes, including this one—a super-aware meta-commentary about the show itself, society, and TV culture, that right before it gets too smart dives deep into the dumb end—which is about Earth being a reality TV show for aliens. No idea is original. “South Park did it” is going to become the new “The Simpsons did it.” —Mose Bergmann

All screenshots via Comedy Central

“Kenny Dies” (Season 5, Episode 13)

By Season 5, Parker and Stone had grown sick of the show’s longest-running gag: the many deaths of Kenny McCormick. So they devised a proper sendoff for the orange-hooded character. The resulting episode is a mostly tender half-hour, in which Stan grapples with the purpose behind god’s plan and Cartman, in hopes of getting a stem-cell research ban overturned, leads Congress in a rendition of Asia’s “Heat of the Moment.” Unfortunately, Cartman’s plan doesn’t work (at least for saving Kenny; he does use his aborted fetuses to clone a Shakey’s Pizza). Fortunately for the show, however, the creators reversed their decision late in Season 6 and brought Kenny back full time. He’s died in the show only sparingly since—and even revealed the source of his immortality later in the show’s run. —Sayles

“Gnomes” (Season 2, Episode 17)

Great episodes are sometimes really just great moments. “Gnomes” as an episode is about a group of underpants-stealing gnomes who infiltrate Tweek’s bedroom—while Tweek’s dad, a monologue-happy proprietor of a small coffee shop, goes to war with Harbucks, a corporate coffee company that has his balls in a “vise grip” and a “salad shredder.” It’s about big business and capitalism and underpants. But “Gnomes” as a moment boils down to this:

The image has been used to explain MoviePass, political movements, and Elon Musk’s takeover of Mars (Elon Musk used it on himself). It’s a great example of South Park’s knack for allegory, an image that succinctly speaks to the harebrained schemes that have defined so much of 21st-century industry—and it’s, rightfully, the lasting legacy of “Gnomes.” I still don’t know what Phase 2 is. Does anyone? Does it even matter? —Andrew Gruttadaro

“Christian Rock Hard” (Season 7, Episode 9)

Not long after bands like Metallica were getting roasted for complaining about music piracy, a local garage band in South Park named Moop was going through some creative differences. Cartman believes so much in his vision that he bets the other members of the band that he can make a platinum-selling album before they do. And what’s the easiest way for Cartman to do that? By starting his own Christian rock band called Faith + 1 and singing about getting on his knees, pleasing Jesus, and feeling his salvation all over his face. —Gallagher

“Cartmanland” (Season 5, Episode 6)

Cartman inherits $1 million from his grandmother and uses it to buy a theme park that only he can use. His decision to ban everybody sparks outrageous demand, and when he’s forced to open up the park to the public to pay for security and maintenance workers, he generates massive profit. Cartman’s newfound wealth and happiness causes Kyle to lose faith in God and develop a hemorrhoid that nearly proves fatal, up until Cartman loses everything out of impatience and sheer stupidity.

This is one of the most basic premises of any South Park episode. It’s also oddly realistic. Change theme park exclusivity to concert exclusivity, and this isn’t far removed from what happened with the Fyre Festival. —Ben Glicksman

“Margaritaville” (Season 13, Episode 3)

To understand consumerism and the collapse of the American housing market in the late aughts, many people have turned to Academy Award–winning film The Big Short, while others, such as myself, have sought truth in South Park’s Emmy-winning “Margaritaville.” In this episode, South Park is turned into a biblical setting after a recession strikes its residents, who have come to view the economy as a vengeful god after Randy Marsh takes it upon himself to berate his neighbors for their frivolous spending. This comes after one of the episode’s highlights, when Randy explains the reasoning of South Park’s economic downturn to Stan, casting blame on materialism and people who’ve taken out loans to spend on nonessential items, all the while using his Margaritaville-branded blender to fix himself a drink. In the end, Kyle takes it upon himself to solve the town’s economic woes, only to see his credit be attributed to President Obama. Like most of South Park’s best episodes, “Margaritaville” takes a culturally relevant subject and presents it in a digestible way using its trademark humor. —Wedemeyer

“Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo” (Season 1, Episode 9)

I can’t begin to explain how incendiary a singing piece of excrement was in I can remember my entire extended family, crowded in a living room on Christmas Eve, keeling over as we watched a poop bounce around a room (leaving a trail behind him) and sing about “festive buns” and levels of, um, corniness. My uncle cried that night. It may seem mild now—stupid, even—but that’s the point. It seems that way in only because South Park has pushed boundaries so far in the intervening years. And it started, in part, with Mr. Hankey. —Gruttadaro

“Stupid Spoiled Whore Video Playset” (Season 8, Episode 12)

In , the showwent in on Paris Hilton and the celebration of socialite celebrity culture. After Hilton arrives in South Park, she watches her dog die by suicide, tries to buy Butters for $ million, and challenges Mr. Slave to a “whore-off” in the middle of town. When later asked about the episode, Hilton said, “I haven’t seen it, but when people copy you, that’s like the most flattering thing.” —Glicksman

“You’re Getting Old” (Season 15, Episode 7)

One of the beauties of animated sitcoms is the characters never get old, unless the creators want them to. Bart Simpson will forever be 10, and his sisters will be 8 and 1. South Park has occasionally played with this: At one point in Season 4, the boys enter fourth grade. Time appears to move slowly in South Park, but unlike for its peers, it moves.

This Season 15 episode tackles the idea of aging in a more philosophical sense. Stan turns 10, and everything starts to sound, look, and taste like shit—literally. A doctor diagnoses Stan with a case of “being a cynical asshole,” and after he ruins an outing to X-Men: First Class, they want nothing to do with him.

While you can’t stay young forever, the episode’s B-plot revolves around what happens when one tries to. Randy, who grits his teeth and pretends to like the tween-wave music the kids are enjoying, eventually begins playing his own music under the moniker “Steamy Ray Vaughn.” He becomes a walking Hard Times punch line: too oblivious to realize he’s too old to be here.

“You’re Getting Old” ends on a sad note—Randy and Sharon’s divorce and Stan’s new, dispiriting life set to “Landslide”—but I choose to remember it for its happy moments, like Duck President. Sometimes, shit just works. —Sayles

“You Got F’d in the A” (Season 8, Episode 4)

This gruesome spoof of the film You Got Served focuses on Butters and his extreme misfortune. After Randy is hospitalized for being served, Stan assembles a ragtag group to avenge his father in a dance-off with kids from Orange County. But he needs a fifth member, and someone suggests Butters, who was once a state tap-dancing champion. But Butters refuses to join because of a prior incident that haunts him. We get a flashback of his last competition, where he’s dancing to the tune of “I’ve Got Something in My Front Pocket for You,” before his shoe flies off into the rafters and kills eight people—or 11, depending on how you count. Stan and Co. are unable to convince Butters, and instead enlist the help of Jeffy the duck, who injures his leg the day of the performance. Butters comes to save the day, but ends up reliving his past horror again, when he ends up killing the entire Orange County team the same exact way he killed all those other people. By a technicality, Team South Park wins, and a traumatized Butters is praised as a hero. Someone definitely got served in this episode; we’re just not exactly sure who. —Yoo

“Towelie” (Season 5, Episode 8)

Towelie is a prototypical rudderless stoner character. Outside of the distinction of being the first stoner to be a sentient towel, there’s no innovation in stoner humor to be found here. He’s a dumb character and Parker and Stone directly acknowledge that with the fake Towelie merch commercial that aired with this episode. The meta-joke of immediately trying to monetize such a cheaply crafted character seemed to give them the green light for all the low-hanging fruit that is Towelie humor. All that being said, when a towel with a high-pitched voice sheepishly asks “You wanna get high?” it’s really fucking funny. And it’s as funny as it is because it’s so egregiously stupid.

This episode is mostly remembered for Towelie’s debut, but its through line hasn’t lost any relevance in the past 18 years. The boys spent the entirety of this episode completely apathetic to every facet of life outside of playing their new Okama Gamesphere. Throughout all the gun fights, parachuting, infiltration of secret bases, and thick exposition, the boys simply do not care about anything they’re doing. They’re living out a video game and yet they’re too blinded by their desire to play a video game to enjoy any of it. For all the Guitar Hero wizards with dusty out-of-tune real guitars, this is a gut punch. —James

“All About Mormons” (Season 7, Episode 12)

South Park is arguably at its best when it satirizes organized religion. There may be no better example than “All About Mormons,” in which a devout Morman family moves to South Park, befriends the Marshes, and teaches them about Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon. “All About Mormons” features a singsong story about the roots of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including Joseph Smith’s tale of being visited by an angel, his use of gold plates and seer stones to translate another new testament of the Bible, and Lucy Harris’s suspicion of Smith. Trey and Matt would later explore the religion further in their play The Book of Mormon, which won nine Tonys, including Best Musical. —Wedemeyer

“ManBearPig” (Season 10, Episode 6)

“I’m totally cereal” is the defining quote from this episode, in which Al Gore is portrayed as a rabid man on the hunt for the episode’s titular creature. It’s a not-so-subtle allusion to Gore’s climate change work. And like in the mids, not many people here seemed to listen to him. (Though Parker and Stone would later atone for this in a pair of Season 22 episodes, aptly titled “Time to Get Cereal” and “Nobody Got Cereal?”) Elsewhere in “ManBearPig,” in classic Cartman fashion, he thinks he finds some gold in a cave that the boys believe to be housing ManBearPig. Cartman decides to hide the treasure by swallowing it all. Then he shits it all out at the end of the episode. All that’s gold in South Park doesn’t always glitter. —David Lara

“Fishsticks” (Season 13, Episode 5)

The best South Park episodes usually have some sort of cultural impact, and “Fishsticks” might have had the most significant in the show’s history. The episode revolves around a joke Jimmy comes up with, with minor help from Cartman:

Do you like fish sticks?

Yeah.

Do you like putting fish sticks in your mouth?

Yeah.

Well, what are you, a gay fish?

The joke goes viral, with every late-night host repeating it on their respective shows. It’s also beloved and understood by everyone except one person, Kanye West. In a quest to fully understand the true meaning of the joke, Kanye goes on a rampage, taking his anger out on people, even killing Carlos Mencia in the process. After talking with Jimmy and Cartman, Kanye eventually has an epiphany, believing that he is a gay fish. The episode concludes with Kanye embracing his new identity in a music video remixing his song “Heartless,” in which he makes love to a fish. The day after the episode aired, Kanye wrote a blog post that began with, “SOUTH PARK MURDERED ME LAST NIGHT AND IT’S PRETTY FUNNY. IT HURTS MY FEELINGS BUT WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM SOUTH PARK!” The post ends with Kanye examining his own ego and his image. (A year later, on “Gorgeous,” he’d rap: “Choke a South Park writer with a fish stick.”) Who would’ve ever thought a dumb joke on a show like South Park could help change someone like Kanye? —Yoo

“The Return of the Fellowship of the Ring to the Two Towers” (Season 6, Episode 13)

As much as South Park is, well, South Park—crass, gross, stupid—it’s also a show about kids. Sometimes I almost forget that detail amid all the wildness and social criticism—and also because Kyle, Cartman, Stan, and Kenny have been in fourth grade for about 20 years. That’s why episodes like these are so much fun. “The Return of the Fellowship” lets the kids play make-believe, but it doesn’t turn up the visual style like Parker and Stone did in later episodes like “Good Times With Weapons.” Even though I can’t entirely relate to the story of returning a cursed porn tape, this episode also serves as a special kind of nostalgia point for someone like me, who as a nerdy, LOTR-obsessed kid, would scour the park near the river with my neighborhood friends for the best-looking stick that could be my own Andúril, or some short stubbies to best imitate Legolas’s double blades (nobody ever wanted to be Gimli), to arm myself in imaginary battles. —Bergmann

“Major Boobage” (Season 12, Episode 3)

On-screen drug trips always present writers with an opportunity to get deeply weird. Kenny and Gerald’s cat urine-induced psychedelic journeys into a direct rip-off of the obscure misogynistic animated sci-fi film Heavy Metal is supremely weird. If you watched this episode having never seen or heard of Heavy Metal, it must have been a real what the fuck moment for you. For those of us who had vague memories of Heavy Metal (or at least its trailer) tucked away in our brains, it was also a what the fuck moment. They really invested all this time, money, and production effort into this niche referential joke with its roots 20 years in the past? More unbelievable than their commitment to the bit however, is how close the parody is to its source material. They even licensed the use of Heavy Metal’s theme by (former) Eagles lead guitarist Don Felder (which still rips). Some of South Park’s greatest successes are just shining a spotlight on something, getting out of the way, and saying “look at how wild this is.” —James

“Cartman’s Mom Is a Dirty Slut” (Season 1, Episode 13)

This episode is one of the earliest and best examples of the show’s constant ability to be smart, self-aware, and amusing in a way that evokes a sort of “funny for us” attitude. Cartman’s search for his real dad uses a classic TV trope with a Rashomon-like story structure, but every time we get a new story shedding new light on the mysterious night of Eric’s conception, there should be a new shocking reveal or twist bringing us closer to the truth. Instead of that, what we get instead is a repeated bludgeoning of the same punch line—the titular fact—about Cartman’s mom’s promiscuity. Eric’s dad could’ve been Chief Running Water, or maybe Chef, but also maybe the Denver Broncos. While the elements of the slut-shaming in this episode have not aged well, this episode remains emblematic of the way South Park can play with story structures and tropes. —Bergmann

“Woodland Critter Christmas” (Season 8, Episode 14)

Christmas is a tradition unlike any other on South Park, which had already gifted viewers classics like “Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo” and “Red Sleigh Down” by the time Stan stumbled across the woodland critters in But this episode is a truly off-the-rails yuletide story involving the Antichrist, a bunny sacrifice, a kidnapped Kyle, and mountain lion cubs performing an abortion. That it all comes from Cartman’s sick mind doesn’t make it any less festive. —Sayles

“The Death of Eric Cartman” (Season 9, Episode 6)

Cartman eats all the skin off of every piece of KFC chicken, infuriating Stan, Kyle, and Kenny. The next day the boys decide to completely ignore Cartman and somehow, he ends up thinking he has died. At the center of the episode is poor old Butters, who isn’t in on the joke and is the only friend who engages with Cartman. Butters tries using religious themes like heaven and “heck” and atonement to help Cartman release his soul from the earth. While Cartman is doing good deeds, Butter believes he’s talking to a ghost and his parents send him to a doctor’s office that runs some extremely unconventional tests. When escaped prisoners later hold the Red Cross hostage, Cartman is inspired to save the day with help from Butters. The guys eventually reveal their joke, to the complete shock of both Cartman and Butters, resulting in one of most priceless moments ever on the show. —Yoo

“Ginger Kids” (Season 9, Episode 11)

This episode shows the range of South Park. It starts with Cartman ripping into kids with red hair (called ginger kids) in an attempt to annoy Kyle, then transitions into Kyle getting revenge by turning Cartman into an actual ginger kid. The ever-aggrieved Cartman uses that to his advantage and creates the Ginger Separatist movement, which aims to abolish all non-redheads. By the end, the episode turns to horror as the ginger kids begin abducting the others. Ultimately, however, the episode concludes on a strange note for Cartman: a song about unity. —Lara

“Casa Bonita” (Season 7, Episode 11)

South Park is at its best not when it’s relying on elaborate plot points or ripped-from-the-headline story lines. Two simple ingredients often make for the perfect episode: a story centered on the eternal conflict between Kyle and Cartman, and one that positions the boys as elementary school kids who like to do elementary-school-kid things. In the case of “Casa Bonita,” it means getting excited about Kyle’s birthday party at a beloved Mexican restaurant chain (a real-life reference from creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker, who frequented the chain growing up in Colorado).

The problem arises when Kyle tells Cartman he’s inviting Butters, not Cartman. The episode features Cartman’s frantic and maniacal efforts to take Butters’s place at the party. It also involves this interaction between Kyle and Cartman, which perfectly encapsulates Cartman’s character, or lack thereof. “That’s not being nice. That’s just putting on a nice sweater,” Kyle says, rebuffing Cartman’s efforts to ingratiate himself to Kyle.

“I don’t understand the difference,” Cartman replies. —Nevins

“Guitar Queer-O” (Season 11, Episode 13)

This episode hits close to home because I was so much like Stan and Kyle. My friends and I would get together to play Guitar Hero, and we also took so much interest in classic rock music that we all attempted to learn the actual guitar. So watching this felt like a direct shot at my friends and me and the rest of Guitar Hero culture. Any kid who played the game at one point and felt like they were actual rock stars only to realize that they were just playing a silly video game in the end can relate. (Shout-out to Thad, who was introduced in this episode: “He doesn’t even need a system. He can play guitar hero acoustically.”) —Lara

“Trapped in the Closet” (Season 9, Episode 12)

Woo boy. It’s the ultimate heat check from Parker and Stone. It’s hard to explain this episode in a sensical and non-litigious way. What’s also hard to explain is how provocative and bizarre it felt when it first aired 15 (!) years ago. The episode’s biggest legacy is how it marked the departure of Isaac Hayes, the longtime voice of Chef and a Scientologist, from the show. Hayes. But that doesn’t adequately explain all that was going on in this episode. It ended with Stan yelling “Go ahead and sue me!” as the end credits rolled with only “John Smith” and “Jane Smith” listed over and over again. Yeah, you really have to see it for yourself. —Nevins

“Member Berries” (Season 20, Episode 1)

South Park began experimenting with episode-to-episode continuity in Season 18, but Season 20 was when that approach coalesced. It proved the show remained in a class of its own when making light of a given moment; more than that, it offered striking commentary on the presidential election, online trolls, and the dangers of nostalgia.

In classic South Park fashion, “Member Berries” took jabs at virtually everyone, and introduced a grape-like fruit that tried to brainwash those who ate it into fetizishing the past. Parts of this seemed harmless enough—“Memba Chewbacca?”—up until the fruit revealed itself to be a hateful and destructive force designed to worsen America’s systemic evils. If you’re always looking backward, you can’t make progress.

At its best, South Park says something important in the dumbest possible way. This episode is an encapsulation. Also, Cartman draws a vagina with balls on his face, because what else would you expect? —Glicksman

“Super Fun Time” (Season 12, Episode 7)

When I was in the fourth grade we went to Genesee Country Village, a re-creation of 19th-century life, full of adults pretending to be people from that time. I remember being pretty convinced—like, “Wow! So that’s how a printing press works?!” and “Whoa, no telephones?!” What I never considered was what would happen if I—or someone else in my class; I was too well-behaved for pranks—forced one of these reenactors to acknowledge the present. That’s the premise of “Super Fun Time,” in my mind one of South Park’s best, cleanest episodes: A group of Die Hard–esque criminals (who robbed a Burger King) turn a field trip at Pioneer Village into a hostage situation that isn’t easily resolved because the reenactors refuse to break character. It’s a simple yet absurd concept that yields shocking yet hilarious results; multiple employees die while pretending not to know what a door code is. It’s a bit that never gets old. —Gruttadaro

9. The Game of Thrones Trilogy (Season 17, Episodes 7 through 9)

My favorite genre of South Park episode is the “role-playing” kind—when the adults in town act so insane they fit perfectly into the boys’ imaginary games. In this epic trilogy, the boys are playing Game of Thrones and the town is preparing for a violent winter because Black Friday is coming. Will Randy and the protectors of the mall be able to hold off the vicious hoard of Black Friday shoppers? Can Cartman successfully betray every single one of his friends in the garden of his angry old neighbor? Will anyone survive the Red Robin Wedding? Who will sit on the Iron Thrones of the console wars, Xbox or PlayStation? And most importantly, will George R.R. Martin’s pizza ever actually come for real? —Gallagher

8. “Medicinal Fried Chicken” (Season 14, Episode 3)

Randy Marsh, the idiotic everyman of suburban white America, is the central focus of some of South Park’s most enduring moments. He functions as the slightly exaggerated Florida Man of Colorado, his rudimentary motivations always leading him to new opportunities to make terrible decisions. This is the episode when Randy intentionally exposes his balls to radiation in order to be eligible for medical marijuana. Does it make sense that Randy’s balls swell to the size of bean bag chairs? No, but the resulting visual gags are hilariously arresting. Once you’ve seen Randy shuttling his balls around town in a wheelbarrow or bouncing on them like a gleeful child on a hopping ball, you’re not likely to forget those images.

Cartman, meanwhile, spends this episode becoming the Scarface of an illegal underground KFC supply chain, which is a role that his character seemed destined to play at some point. As Cartman snorts lines of KFC and Randy struggles to fit his enlarged balls through the dispensary doorway, Parker and Stone somehow manage to make a decently cogent argument against unnecessarily criminalizing substances that aren’t definitively harmful. —James

7. The Cartoon Wars (Season 10, Episodes 3 and 4)

There’s nothing like a good diss track. Do you remember where you were when Drake dropped “Back to Back,” or when Pusha-T released “Exodus ”? There’s just something about a beef: the electricity in the air, the pettiness, and the way you can hear the rapper’s snarl or smirk through the song. There’s nothing like it. So imagine the excitement in when it came to light that one animation titan was devoting a two-episode arc to take shots at another. South Park’s pointed takedown of Family Guy’s randomness-instead-of-actual-jokes quality—with the reveal that a tank of manatees write the show by randomly selecting floating word balls—is genius. It’s basically like if “The Story of Adidon”had subbed out the line “You are hiding a child” for something like “You are hiding a sperm factory that is creating a culture-hopping army.” —Bergmann

6. “The Simpsons Already Did It” (Season 6, Episode 7)

Every modern animated sitcom is directly indebted to The Simpsons. In this Season 6 episode, South Park tackles the inevitable comparisons head-on. Butters, in his evil alter ego Professor Chaos, devises a series of schemes to take down the town: First, he wants to build a device to black out the sun, something that Mr. Burns famously did. Then, he decapitates the town’s statue, which only reminds residents of Bart lopping off Jebediah Springfield’s head. After Butters’s assistant Dougie points out that his third plan—building a faulty monorail and running off with the town’s money—was also a beloved Simpsons plot, Butters snaps and begins seeing traces of Matt Groening’s show everywhere. (One must imagine that Parker and Stone often feel the same way when creating episodes.) But even in a homage to the longest-running scripted prime-time series ever, the South Park creators are able to show what makes their show so different: The episode’s A-plot revolves around Cartman acquiring “sea men” (ugh) to help grow a society of sea people in his bedroom aquarium. It’s a reference to a classic “Treehouse of Terror” plot that saw Lisa accidentally create a new world in a petri dish. But Lisa didn’t have to go through the, um, lengths Cartman did to build a new world. When Cartman explains to Butters at the episode’s end that The Simpsons has done everything already, he’s right. But The Simpsons has never done it like this. —Sayles

5. “The Losing Edge” (Season 9, Episode 5)

“I’m sorry, I thought this was America?!”

Put it on a red hat. Randy Marsh’s outcry at not being allowed to fight all of the rival-team dads at his kid’s baseball games during their playoff run was instantly iconic. A lament that hit home across a certain disaffected subset of white America, it’s Randy’s right to do whatever he wants, because he’s white and middle class. While Randy embarks on a Rocky-like journey across the baseball stadiums of Colorado, literally fighting to uphold the American Dream of unrestricted freedom, the boys are shitting on the great American pastime of baseball, failing upward in their attempts to out-suck their opponents. Sending up a litany of sports movie tropes while giving us an all-time line and also introducing Kyle’s nerdy cousin Kyle, “The Losing Edge” is undeniably one of South Park’s best. —Bergmann

4. “Imaginationland” Trilogy (Season 11, Episode )

This is Parker and Stone’s opus. If you put the three episodes together and ran them as a feature film, it’d be one of the best animated movies ever. An expert display of topical humor, satire, cultural references, and, crucially, the most contentious and consequential Cartman vs. Kyle battle in the show’s history. —Nevins

3. “Good Times With Weapons” (Season 8, Episode 1)

A master class in animation, at least by South Park standards. After the boys get their hands on martial arts weapons, they live out their ninja warrior fantasies as the episode transitions from the show’s traditional animation to an anime style. Trey Parker sang an original track called “Let’s Fighting Love,” and the episode turns after Butters takes a ninja star to the eye and the boys try to pass him off as a dog to avoid getting in trouble. That’s it. That’s the episode. —Nevins

2. “Make Love, Not Warcraft” (Season 10, Episode 8)

It’s an iconic episode of South Park for its timeliness and ingenuity in incorporating World of Warcraft–style animation. It’s also one of the show’s dumbest episodes ever while simultaneously being a near-perfect ode to the world of MMORPGs. In the episode, the boys take it upon themselves to defeat an evil and powerful character who has killed a majority of the players in the game. The powerful force is a man who has played WoW every hour of every day for a year and a half. Cartman rallies the gang and comes up with a plan to defeat this foe that involves killing approximately 65 million boars, a task that would take more than seven weeks to complete. In a classic montage set to Paul Stanley’s “Live to Win,” the boys eventually accomplish their goal and in turn, become obese, pimply, Rockstar-drinking machines. And thanks to Randy’s help in retrieving the “The Sword of a Thousand Truths,” the boys defeat this great evil force—just to go back to playing the game they love. For how stupid the episode is, Matt and Trey brilliantly mirrored the ethos of WoW while expertly satirizing the simulated high stakes of the game. While the obsession with World of Warcraft may have subsided for most people, the episode still resonates with the audience nearly 14 years after its release. —Yoo

1. “Scott Tenorman Must Die” (Season 5, Episode 4)

“Oh, the tears of unfathomable sadness … ”

It’s been argued that South Park didn’t become what it is until this Season 5 episode. Whether that’s true or not, it is clear that no one realized just how sinister Cartman could be until this point.

“Scott Tenorman Must Die” starts out innocently enough, by South Park standards: Cartman bought some stray pubic hair from the titular red-headed ninth-grader, believing that’s all it took to launch him into puberty. The rest of the boys laugh at him, and he sets out to get his $10 back. One problem: Tenorman is smarter than Cartman. He swindles him out of an additional $ and records a video of him oinking while he begs. Irate, the fourth-grader devises a series of plans to seek revenge—the most promising of which is a convoluted scheme that would have a pony bite off Tenorman’s penis. Nobody is impressed, including the viewer. And then Cartman invites Scott to his Chili Con Carnival …

This episode aired on July 11, Nineteen years later, I can clearly recall my teenage self’s reaction to its conclusion. I had never seen something that was so shocking and hilarious and twisted all at once. I couldn’t laugh or speak, let alone process the depravity. The whole episode, Cartman had been the rube, getting dunked on by someone five years his senior. At its end, he reveals that he turned the pony plot into a way to have Tenorman’s parents killed by the horse’s owner and then heused their remains to make his chili, which he then fed to Scott. And then he gets Radiohead to show up and mock their biggest fan as he mourns the death of his parents. Really dark stuff, man. But also South Park at its best.

“Dude, I think it might be best for us to never piss Cartman off again,” Kyle says as he takes in what just unfolded. At least someone could muster a thought.

The episode has been compared to Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus. It also recalls Game of Thrones’ Frey pie. I guess in that regard, South Park is one of the great epics of our time. —Sayles

Sours: https://www.theringer.com/tv//6/24//south-park-episodes-ranked


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