South park season 3

South park season 3 DEFAULT

South Park

Many times, something will appear in the media - be it a movie, comic book or TV show - that is shocking and winds up attracting the audience merely because of the shock value. Eventually, that quality goes away and the reader or viewer finds there is little else there. For a decade, South Park has defied this rule: not only does it continue to be edgy, but beyond the edginess, there is real humor and often a worthwhile statement as well.

In Season Three, the foursome of third-graders - Stan, Kyle, Cartman and Kenny - get involved in new adventures. Once again, little is safe from creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone: among the subjects of their pointed humor: Pokemon, the rain forest, child molesters, Jar Jar Binks and the Y2K phenomenon (as well as Sally Struthers, God, Jesus and Civil War reenactors.

Probably my favorite episode of this season is Korn's Groovy Pirate Ghost Mystery, a take-off on Scooby Doo cartoons featuring members of the band Korn in place of Fred, Shaggy, Daphne, Velma and Scooby. Who are the mysterious ghost pirates (or pirate ghosts) that haunt South Park? You'll have to watch and find out.

What also stands out about this season is what could be known as The Meteor Shower trilogy. In this series of three episodes, we follow different characters all on the night of a meteor shower: Cartman is babysat by Shelly (Stan's mean older sister); Stan is stuck in the basement at a party while ATF agents are ready to blow up the place thinking there is a cult inside; and Kenny and Kyle go to Jewbilee, a Jewish camp where Moses visits. More than any earlier episodes, this trilogy shows that Parker and Stone were willing to break free from their normal storytelling and do something different.

Happily, even the weaker episodes (of which there only a few - I'd rate Sexual Harassment Panda towards the bottom) are four-star quality, so this is definitely a five-star set overall. If you've never viewed South Park, this may be as good a place as any to start, but be prepared: if you offend easily, this is not the cartoon for you. If, on the other hand, you like shows that not only push the envelope but go outside it, South Park is a joy to watch.

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/South-Park-Season-3/dp/B000HSKLJA
  1. Choir Tour

    The boys are sent to the Costa Rican rainforest as a part of the Getting Gay with Kids choir tour.

    The boys are sent to the Costa Rican rainforest as a part of the Getting Gay with Kids choir tour.

  2. Spontaneous Combustion

    Citizens of South Park start exploding at random, and Cartman gets crucified.

    Citizens of South Park start exploding at random, and Cartman gets crucified.

  3. Succubus

    Chef finds the girl of his dreams, but the boys feel like they’ve lost their best friend.

    Chef finds the girl of his dreams, but the boys feel like they’ve lost their best friend.

  4. Jakovasaurs

    The boys discover two living prehistoric incredibly annoying Jakovasaurs at Stark's Pond.

    The boys discover two living prehistoric incredibly annoying Jakovasaurs at Stark's Pond.

  5. Tweek vs. Craig

    The boys coerce their reluctant classmates, Tweek and Craig, into a school yard fight.

    The boys coerce their reluctant classmates, Tweek and Craig, into a school yard fight.

  6. Sexual Harassment Panda

    Cartman sues Stan for sexual harassment.

    Cartman sues Stan for sexual harassment.

  7. Cat Orgy

    While Shelly's babysitting Eric, a wild and unsupervised kitty party breaks out at the Cartman home.

    While Shelly's babysitting Eric, a wild and unsupervised kitty party breaks out at the Cartman home.

  8. Two Guys Naked In a Hot Tub

    Stan must save Mr. Mackey's meteor shower party from the ATF, while the South Park dads experiment in the hot tub.

    Stan must save Mr. Mackey's meteor shower party from the ATF, while the South Park dads experiment in the hot tub.

  9. Jewbilee

    While the rest of South Park awaits the meteor shower, Kyle, Kenny and Ike head into the wilderness on a Jewbilee.

    While the rest of South Park awaits the meteor shower, Kyle, Kenny and Ike head into the wilderness on a Jewbilee.

  10. Chinpokomon

    South Park kids go crazy for Chinpokomon and suddenly find themselves fixated on Peal Harbor.

    South Park kids go crazy for Chinpokomon and suddenly find themselves fixated on Peal Harbor.

  11. Korn's Groovy Pirate Ghost Mystery (Halloween)

    Korn helps the boys defeat Pirate Ghosts and mean fifth graders in this haunting Halloween episode.

    Korn helps the boys defeat Pirate Ghosts and mean fifth graders in this haunting Halloween episode.

  12. Hooked On Monkey Fonics

    The boys compete against some home schooled kids in South Park's annual spelling bee.

    The boys compete against some home schooled kids in South Park's annual spelling bee.

  13. Starvin' Marvin In Space

    When Starvin' Marvin returns to South Park, the boys join him on a food gathering mission, pursued by the CIA, the Feed the Children Foundation and Sally Struthers.

    When Starvin' Marvin returns to South Park, the boys join him on a food gathering mission, pursued by the CIA, the Feed the Children Foundation and Sally Struthers.

  14. The Red Badge of Gayness

    South Park's Civil War Reenactment, sponsored by "Jagerminz S'more Flavored Schnapps," gets out of hand.

    South Park's Civil War Reenactment, sponsored by "Jagerminz S'more Flavored Schnapps," gets out of hand.

  15. Mr. Hankey's Christmas Classics

    Classic hits from " Mr. Hankey's Christmas Classics" album - featuring the boys and all of South Park's most joyful citizens.

    Classic hits from " Mr. Hankey's Christmas Classics" album - featuring the boys and all of South Park's most joyful citizens.

  16. Are You There God, It's Me Jesus

    Stan goes through a few rapidly wrong hormonal changes, and Jesus calls in for a miracle.

    Stan goes through a few rapidly wrong hormonal changes, and Jesus calls in for a miracle.

  17. The Brown Noise

    The boys go to Arkansas for the "4 Million-Child Blow 2000!", the first worldwide recorder concert.

    The boys go to Arkansas for the "4 Million-Child Blow 2000!", the first worldwide recorder concert.

© 2009 Viacom International Inc. All Rights Reserved

More Seasons in Series

Viewers Also Bought

Top Comedy Shows

Sours: https://itunes.apple.com/us/tv-season/south-park-season-3/id135510076
  1. Abc audio description turn off
  2. 2006 suzuki ltz 400 exhaust
  3. Brown county humane society kansas
  4. Da vinci connect high school
  5. Everything is my fault meme

South Park (season 3)

Season of television series

South Park
SouthParkseason3.jpg

DVD cover

Country of originUnited States
No. of episodes17
Original networkComedy Central
Original releaseApril 7, 1999 (1999-04-07) –
January 12, 2000 (2000-01-12)

← Previous
Season 2

Next →
Season 4

List of episodes

The third season of South Park, an American animated television comedy series, originally aired in the United States on Comedy Central between April 7, 1999, and January 12, 2000.[1] The season was headed by the series creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, who served as executive producers along with Anne Garefino. The season continued to focus on the exploits of protagonists Stan, Kyle, Cartman, and Kenny in the fictional Colorado mountain town of South Park.

The season consisted of seventeen 22-minute episodes, which aired mostly in two groups separated by a three-month gap. Continuing their practice from previous seasons, Parker and Stone wrote and produced each episode within the week before its broadcast date. They produced the first half of the season simultaneously while working on the show's film adaption, South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut. The show's creators considered the third season an improvement on the previous season, due to a heavier focus on strong storytelling structure and character development, as well as increased creative control. In the second half of the season, the show was dealt a blow with the death of voice actress Mary Kay Bergman, who provided many of the female voices on the show. The remaining three episodes in the season are mostly absent of female voices for this reason.

The third season satirized such topics as the Waco siege, tropical rainforest conservation, and sexual harassment, films such as Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace, Tron, and Gettysburg, and television shows such as Scooby-Doo and Pokémon. It also continues the show's tradition of lampooning celebrities, which in this season include Cher, Pat Robertson, and Rod Stewart. The season features a guest appearance from both the nu metal band Korn and Friends actress Jennifer Aniston.

Voice cast[edit]

This is the final season to feature Mary Kay Bergman as a series regular, who provided many of the female voices on the show. Bergman committed suicide on November 11, 1999. The remaining three episodes in the season are mostly absent of female voices for this reason.

Main cast[edit]

  • Trey Parker as Stan Marsh, Eric Cartman, Randy Marsh, Mr. Garrison, Clyde Donovan, Mr. Hankey, Mr. Mackey, Stephen Stotch, Jimmy Valmer, Timmy Burch and Phillip.
  • Matt Stone as Kyle Broflovski, Kenny McCormick, Butters Stotch, Gerald Broflovski, Stuart McCormick, Pip Pirrup, Craig Tucker, Jimbo Kern, Terrance, Tweek Tweak and Jesus.
  • Mary Kay Bergman (Episodes 1–12) as Liane Cartman, Sheila Broflovski, Shelly Marsh, Sharon Marsh, Mrs. McCormick and Wendy Testaburger.
  • Eliza Schneider (Episodes 16–17) as Sharon Marsh, Ms. Crabtree & Various
  • Isaac Hayes as Chef

Guest cast[edit]

Background[edit]

Development[edit]

After the second season of South Park, show creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone began to take more creative control of the show back, which they had delegated in the previous season to a writing staff.[2] Parker and Stone have openly expressed dislike for the second season as a whole. "There's a lot of funny stuff in the second season," Stone remarked, but Parker agreed that they were still learning how to write for the show.[3] They took the advice of friends in the television industry and let other writers on the staff write scripts and take more control of the show, which they later regretted.[4] They even considered developing a show for broadcast television and leaving South Park, but they decided to continue working on it.[4] On the DVD commentaries for the third season, Parker advised viewers to "throw away your season two DVDs. I don't like those shows."[5] Parker would later say the same about the third season: "If I had to permanently erase anything from the library, it would basically be anything before season 4. It's just embarrassing to watch. Okay, we were, like, 26, 27. But it's like, 'Really? We thought that was funny? We thought that was well-written? Oh my God, this is terrible.'"[6]

Like many South Park seasons, episodes were mostly produced in the week preceding their original broadcasts.[7]

Writing[edit]

Parker characterized the third season as "where South Park turned the corner... and [became] good to us."[8] The third season was produced simultaneously with the film adaption of the series—South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut—and came at a time when the duo began learning more about story structure and character development. They applied these lessons to the show as well.[8] Parker noted that producing the film and season at the same time was "tough." The show and film occupied two separate buildings a mile apart that the duo would often have to switch between.[8]Paramount Pictures was unhappy with the duo working on the show equally with the film.[9] "Jakovasaurs" arrived at a peak of post-production work on the film.[10] Parker and Stone claim to have no memory of making "Sexual Harassment Panda", the following episode, due to their exhaustion from working on the film: "We don't remember doing these shows at all," Parker remarked in the episode's commentary.[11] Stone characterized the episode as "delusionary writing."[12]

With the film completed for its June 30, 1999 release date, the duo still were contracted to produce three more episodes before taking a break. They came up with the idea to produce a trilogy of episodes—"Cat Orgy", "Two Guys Naked in a Hot Tub", and "Jewbilee"—which they called "the meteor shower trilogy." They felt "brain-dead" on ideas and created the idea to make things easier.[13] "Two Guys Naked in a Hot Tub" features the first major appearance of Butters Stotch, who became a main character in the series in later seasons; prior to this episode, he was a nameless background character, having had a non-speaking background role in "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe".[14] They based Butters on the show's animation director, Eric Stough, whom they mocked while working on the film.[15] "Jewbilee", the trilogy's conclusion, became regarded as one of the duo's favorite all-time episodes. "We were literally crawling around the floor trying to finish the show but we were also all already on vacation in our minds," Parker remembered.[16] To this end, they decided not to care about the episode's content and just make whatever came to mind. Following the episode's completion, the staff took a vacation for a month, returning later in the year to complete the rest of the season.[16]

Their first episode back, in October 1999, was "Korn's Groovy Pirate Ghost Mystery". Parker remembered the making of the episode difficult, as they had been away for so long.[17] "Chinpokomon" features the guest voice of Parker's old college friend Junichi Nishimura, and several elements of the script—namely, the Japanese having "small penises"—were inspired by a trip to Beijing with Nishimura. In the trip, Nishimura's boss kept referring to the size of his own penis as "so small", which became a joke in the episode.[18] "Hooked on Monkey Fonics" was based on a friend of Parker and Stone's, who homeschooled his child.[19] To Stone, the episode distilled down the essence of South Park: that children are not innocent, but rather "little bastards."[20] "Starvin' Marvin in Space" was produced around Thanksgiving 1999, and the duo decided to write a sequel to the season one episode "Starvin' Marvin". The duo thought of it as not a regular episode of South Park, but something wholly its own.[21]

After completing the dialogue for the aforementioned episode, Mary Kay Bergman, the voice actress behind many of the female characters on South Park, was found dead of suicide. Parker and Stone, shocked by the news, made the remaining episodes in the third season revolve around mainly male characters, beginning with "The Red Badge of Gayness".[22] "Mr. Hankey's Christmas Classics" is mostly an animated music video, of sorts, to the album of the same name which was released one week prior. Parker and Stone had spent several weeks with composer Marc Shaiman, whom they had worked with on Bigger, Longer & Uncut, to create an entire album of South Park-themed holiday songs.[23] "Are You There God? It's Me, Jesus" was made at the request of the network to produce an episode centering on the New Millennium.[24] "World Wide Recorder Concert" fulfilled their contractual obligations with the network, and required the team to come back after the Christmas break to complete it.[5]

Cultural references[edit]

The central character in "Jakovasaurs" is based on Jar Jar Binks from Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999).[10] Plot elements of "Two Guys Naked in a Hot Tub" were inspired by a HBO documentary on the Waco siege, perhaps Waco: The Rules of Engagement; Parker and Stone regarded the incident as a "disaster". They parody the pop star Cher and her song "Believe" for the episode, used for tortuous purposes. The parody was performed by staff writer Pam Brady.[14][15] In "Jewbilee", the Moses character is patterned after the Master Control Program from the film Tron.[16] The nu metal band Korn guest star in the episode "Korn's Groovy Pirate Ghost Mystery". Korn approached the show's staff with the idea to premiere their new single, "Falling Away from Me", on South Park.[17] Parker and Stone were at first unreceptive to the offer, but became more excited when the idea came to portray them in a cheesy fashion, like the appearances of the Harlem Globetrotters in The New Scooby-Doo Movies. The animators attempted to model the animation after Hanna-Barbera's style.[17]

"Chinpokomon" satirizes the phenomenon of the Pokémon franchise, which at the time was at its peak of popularity. To prepare, the show's writing staff sat down and watched episodes of the Pokémon anime, which they regarded as nothing more than marketing to buy trading cards.[18] "Starvin' Marvin in Space" mocks media mogul and minister Pat Robertson and his program, The 700 Club.[21] "The Red Badge of Gayness" references American Civil War reenactments and parodies the film Gettysburg.[7] "Mr. Hankey's Christmas Classics" features an obscure reference to a bootleg tape of the one broadcast of the Star Wars Holiday Special, in which a news reporter, teasing the late-night news, remarks, "Fighting the frizzies, at eleven." Parker called it "one of the most obscure things we've ever done in South Park.[23] "Are You There God? It's Me, Jesus" mocks the musician Rod Stewart and the Backstreet Boys, and its title references the book Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret..[24]

Episodes[edit]

See also: List of South Park episodes

References[edit]

  1. ^"South Park: Episode Guide: Season 3". Zap2it. Archived from the original on November 11, 2013. Retrieved February 2, 2012.
  2. ^Leonard, Devin (October 27, 2006). "'South Park' creators haven't lost their edge". Fortune. Archived from the original on July 9, 2015. Retrieved March 16, 2016.
  3. ^Stone, Matt (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Rainforest Shmainforest"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  4. ^ abItzkoff, Dave (March 10, 2010). "'South Park' at 200: Trey Parker and Matt Stone Apologize to No One". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  5. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "World Wide Recorder Concert"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  6. ^"'South Park': Matt Stone and Trey Parker Name Their 15 Best Episodes (and 53 Worst)". Entertainment Weekly. October 11, 2011. Archived from the original on March 10, 2016. Retrieved March 21, 2016.
  7. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "The Red Badge of Gayness"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  8. ^ abcParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Rainforest Shmainforest"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  9. ^Parker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Spontaneous Combustion"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  10. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Jakovasaurs"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  11. ^Parker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Sexual Harassment Panda"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  12. ^Stone, Matt (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Sexual Harassment Panda"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  13. ^Parker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Cat Orgy"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  14. ^ abStone, Matt (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Two Guys Naked in a Hot Tub"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  15. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Two Guys Naked in a Hot Tub"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  16. ^ abcParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Jewbilee"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  17. ^ abcParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Korn's Groovy Pirate Ghost Mystery"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  18. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Chinpokomon"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  19. ^Parker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Hooked on Monkey Fonics"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  20. ^Stone, Matt (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Hooked on Monkey Fonics"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  21. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Starvin' Marvin in Space"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  22. ^Stone, Matt (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "The Red Badge of Gayness"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  23. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Mr. Hankey's Christmas Classics"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  24. ^ abParker, Trey (December 2003). South Park: The Complete Third Season: "Are You There God? It's Me, Jesus"(Audio commentary) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  25. ^"Watch South Park Episodes Online Season 3 (2000)". TV Guide. Archived from the original on August 13, 2019. Retrieved September 13, 2019.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Park_(season_3)
\

Sergei to the slaughter, and Lena, turning on the water, began to prepare a new enema. unable to do this and immediately plopped down on one of the pots, which stood not far from the bed. I'm afraid.

Park 3 south season

Of my life. My daughter came over and hugged me tightly. Oh mom wait That very long day of the year With its cloudless weather It gave us a common misfortune For everyone, for all four years. She so pressed the trail And so many laid on the ground, That twenty years and thirty years Alive can not believe that they are alive.

Poems stunning in terms of intensity and emotions.

25 Family Guy Deleted Scenes That Were Too Much For TV

The same outfit for his wife. He whispered to me: I am now undressing you, Tatiana, and at the same time I dream that I would have such happiness. In life, so that in the same way, in front of other men, I myself would undress my own wife naked with my own hands. Dreaming about it!" It was so touching when you were publicly stripped like a queen.

Of course, my current boss knew about the tattoo.

Now discussing:

Then they spread her legs wide to the sides, brought her ankles back and tied them to the back legs of the chair. The hem of the dress was raised especially high this time. Victor took a few more pictures, one from the side, when the lace elastic bands of her stockings were clearly visible. The other is from the front, capturing the inner surfaces of her spread thighs and her crotch covered by her panties.



4865 4866 4867 4868 4869