Dnd 5e level up

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D&D 5e Leveling Guide: What Happens When You Level Up?

As your character grows in experience and notoriety, you would expect them to grow in power. And you’d be right!

That’s exactly what a level up is: a representation of a character’s growing power as they gain access to new abilities and class features.

But experience isn’t so easily modeled. A character slaying their first dragon will have learned much more from that fight than someone who’s just hunted their hundredth. The EXP per dragon doesn’t change, but the hunter’s obviously learned less. Why is that?

D&D’s EXP system has always been notoriously archaic and confusing. At its heart it’s a wonderful idea, a way to promote more character centric play and allow for growth in abilities.

Still, attaching what should be significant moments of improvement and inspiration to arbitrary numbers, it doesn’t make much sense.

Let’s get the basics of leveling out of the way, then get into some of the ways that you can adapt D&D’s level up system to better fit your game.

What Happens When You Level Up in 5e?

Whenever you slay enough monsters, finish enough quests, or really any time your DM sees fit, you can achieve a level up.

For the sake of not having this be two hundred pages long I’m going to talk in incredibly broad strokes, but this is one topic I feel comfortable handing off to the Player’s Handbook. It does a phenomenal job explaining the step by step nuances of your classes level up.

So for specifics, head to your classes section of your PHB. It’ll be arranged chronologically from character generation to level 20. Just skim through until you find your applicable level.

For generalities, well that’s what you’re here for!

Leveling in D&D is almost exponential in terms of character power.

This means a 10th level wizard is not merely twice as powerful as a 5th level wizard. There’s orders of magnitudes of difference between the two.

This is generally because of more access to better options. For wizards that looks like more spell slots and better spells.

Your stats also mirror this idea, for levels 1-4 your proficiency bonus (the bonus you get for specializing into the skills you choose as you’re making your character) is +2, for levels 5-8 it’s +3, 9-12 +4, 13-16 +5, and 17-20 +6.

This may seem insignificant. But any numbers you can add to your dice rolls are good numbers.

Every 4 levels (levels 4,8,12,16 and 20) you also get what’s called an ability score increase, or ASI.

Your ability scores are the primary stats on the left side of your character sheet, Strength, Dex, etc.

Essentially you get two points added to whatever score you want. Either two points to one score, or one point to two different ones.

So when you level up you get more numbers to add to dice, and new class skills.

If you have any sort of gaming experience, this is probably exactly what you were expecting. So let’s get into a specific example of what that might look like.

5e Leveling Up Example

For this example we’re going to be leveling up a Bard 2 to a Bard 3.

The only stats that are relevant are Charisma, which will affect a skill we get, and our Constitution, which changes how much health we get on a level up.

For our Bard, they’ll both be 12 (+1)

To start, let’s configure our new health!

When you level up you’ll have the choice of either rolling your class’ hit dice +Constitution to find your new health, or taking an ‘adjusted median’ (half of the max for your hit dice +1) +Constitution.

To keep it simple we’re going to take the adjusted median and pretend we’ve done that since character creation.

So for a d8-based Bard with a +1 Constitution, level 1 health would be 9. Our adjusted median would be 5, plus our Constitution is 6, so for every level until our Constitution changes or we multiclass into different hit dice we get 6 more health.

Level 2 health is 15, and now that I’m leveling up to level 3 my health would jump to 21.

At level 3 I get to pick my Bard College, which is the bardic subclass.

Subclasses are basically specialties inside of your class. Imagine it like the different medical professions you can have: Neurosurgeons and Pediatricians are both doctors, but in vastly different ways.

Every class gets a subclass at either level 2 or 3. And this drastically shapes how your character will play, so give it lots of thought.

When I pick my subclass I’ll get a few immediate bonuses. I like the idea of a combat heavy bard, so I decide to subclass into the College of Valor.

At level 3 this gives me proficiency with medium armor, shields, and martial weapons, which basically means when I use any of those I can add my proficiency bonus to them.

I also gain a new way to use the Bard’s signature spell, Inspiration… but that’s pretty specific so we’re not going to get into it.

And that’s it!

That’s all it takes, you just follow along in the PHB and make choices when it tells you to. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it.

Remember, there are class skills, and there are subclass skills. Make sure to check both sections when you level up.

How To Calculate EXP in 5e

This is mostly in regards to monster slaying, because quest EXP is either determined by the manual you’re playing in, or at the discretion of your DM.

With monsters, the EXP you gain is determined by its challenge rating, which should be on the stat block you or your DM is using for the monster.

If you’re homebrewing, check out this link to make custom monster stat blocks.

I know it can be tempting, especially for good DM’s with lots of game knowledge, to just run the combat on the fly. But having a premade stat block is incredibly helpful for making your combat feel more consistent (especially if you’re playing with rules lawyers who will call you out on dice not making sense).

As for adding the EXP to your character sheet, there should be a blank in the top right corner for it, and it is cumulative between levels so all EXP contributes to lifetime EXP.

What To Look For On Each Level

Let’s go through level by level and show you know what you should be expecting to get at that level, because most classes follow the same general pattern to keep the game balanced.

The number beside the level in parenthesis is what your proficiency bonus will be at that level.

Level 1 (+2): Starting Level, you’ll find your classes starting health (unless you’ve multiclassed) and usually gain access to that class’s signature ability.

For Barbarians this is Rage, Bards get Inspiration, Wizards get their spell book, etc.

You’ll also get your classes proficiencies and skills. This is usually the busiest level in terms of new skills.

Level 2 (+2): Now the ones with good primary skills get access to theirs (think Lay on Hands for Clerics, and Action Surge for Fighters, Monks Ki).

If you’re lucky, you’ll also gain access to your subclass at level 2 which will give you a slew of abilities to play with.

Clerics (technically at lvl 1, but they get some skills now), Druids, Sorcerers (same deal as Clerics, but you get your skills lvl 1), and Wizards keep a lookout for your subclasses.

Level 3 (+2): Everyone else, this is your subclass level.

Level 4 (+2): First Ability Score Increase! Remember, you can trade this out for a feat if the mood strikes you.

Level 5 (+3): Now you get your class’s secondary ability. For combat classes it’s probably more attacks, for casters it’s access to your first ‘big’ spells.

Level 6 (+3): Subclass (tertiary) ability (normally), for a few classes it’s a class ability. But either way it’s usually nothing to write home about. Except for Bards, Bards get shredded at level 6.

Level 7 (+3): For casters you get a higher spell slot, for everyone else it’s probably an ability.

Level 8 (+3): Ability Score Increase number two!

Level 9 (+4): This is either your class’ tertiary ability, or higher spell slots.

You’ll see that physical classes like the Barbarian typically get more abilities than the caster classes, but that’s because every level casters get access to new spells. So new spell slots plus new skills would make the game more unbalanced than it already is.

Level 10 (+4): More small abilities for everyone except for Rogues, who actually have more ability score increases than any other class. They get one of their extra’s here

Level 11 (+4): Buff to primary ability for physical classes, spell slots for casters. Warlocks get access to a new ability.

Level 12 (+4): Ability Score Increase number three!

Level 13 (+5): Buff to second/tertiary ability, except for Monks and Rogues which get a new skill, casters get higher spell slots.

Level 14 (+5): Subclass improvement/new skill.

Level 15 (+5): You know the pattern, new/buffed ability for physicals, higher level spell slots for casters.

Level 16 (+5): Fourth Ability Score Increase!

Level 17 (+6): More buffs for the secondary/tertiary ability. This is probably the caster’s biggest level since they finally gain access to 9th level, reality bending, world-ending spells.

Level 18 (+6): 18th and 20th levels typically have your class’ most involved/coolest skills; these are the reasons you took the class.

Level 19 (+6): Your last Ability Score Increase.

Level 20: The magnum opus of your class.

For Fighters it’s your third attack per turn, for casters it’s usually some form of regaining spell slots to keep you casting for longer.

Either way, if you’ve made it to level 20 you are now the pinnacle of what your class represents.

For multiclassing, max is based off the sum of your character’s levels, ex: Fighter 10/Barbarian 10 is max level.

If you want class specific & detailed layouts of pretty much exactly what I just spelled out, check out D&D Beyond’s class information. They’re the best.

How To Better Represent Growth By Leveling

I’d like to share my personal opinion on how I’ve had the most fun with D&D 5e.

However, you should always support the choices your DM’s make. Don’t use this article as proof that hard EXP systems are garbage.

That’s not to say that EXP systems aren’t garbage. But your DM’s trying their best and they don’t need that sass.

One of the oddest occurrences in the already odd system is that leveling from lvl 10 to 11 takes 21k EXP, but leveling from 11 to 12 only requires 15k EXP?

The reason for this is most commonly cited to one thing: in early 5e playtesting, most campaigns stopped around level 12 or 13.

Wizards of the Coast wanted to encourage more play.

So they made it easier to level up, and that much easier to anticipate your next skill. The heart of the problem, though, is that the EXP system was dragging out people’s games, and making them unenjoyable to the point where players who had invested hundreds of hours into that character were getting bored.

People were getting stuck in the middle levels so often that WotC had to step in and make gameplay changes to try and alleviate it.

The Milestone system dodges that problem by letting the DM decide when their players level up, often at pivotal choices, points of character development, or after a sufficiently herculean task.

When you attach leveling up to a specific achievable goal, instead of an ephemeral number, you don’t run into the problem of player burnout nearly as often

The primary reason is that you as the DM have more control.

You don’t have to artificially pump EXP numbers, or have them fight twelve plot irrelevant dragons to reach the magic number. If your players are ready, it’s your call.

It offers a level of specificity and customizability that a pre-established EXP system never could.

The milestone system isn’t some obscure branch of homebrew either. D&D Beyond, probably the most credible character builder out there, lists it as one of the options under their tab for calculating EXP.

The milestone, in my opinion, is the way that D&D was always meant to be played. Sessions can play out more like stories, with characters getting stronger as the adventure calls for it.

D&D is a game riddled with archaic traditions and rules that can feel like they’re carved into stone. But the responsibility of a DM is to the enjoyment of their players.

I highly recommend sitting down and experimenting with the Milestone system the next time you play, and unsaddle your campaign from the hail of numbers that is our overworked EXP system.

You’d be surprised how much fun it can be.

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You just finished the session. Your Dungeon Master doles out that sweet, sweet XP. And, to your and the other players’ delight, you level up…

If you’re new to Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition, leveling up can be a little intimidating. And, even if you’ve played for a bit, it’s easy to forget certain aspects of leveling up your character.

And, leveling up is so much more than an increase to your hit points. You need to check modifiers, spells, and features among other things.

And, we’re going to go into detail for each of these.

Let’s get to it.

Did Your Proficiency Bonus Increase?

First off, you should check to see if your Proficiency bonus increases.

Since this number affects nearly everything your does, it’s super important to remember when it gets a bump. But, since it stays relatively static and only changes at certain character levels, it’s easy to forget.

Remember: your Proficiency bonus increases according to your character level and not your class level.

Here’s how your Proficiency bonus breaks down:

  • 1st-4th Levels: +2
  • 5th-8th Levels: +3
  • 9th-12th Levels: +4
  • 13th-16th Levels: +5
  • 17th-20th Levels: +6

Basically, your Proficiency bonus increases every 4 levels: 5th, 9th, 13th, and 17th.

Now, your Proficiency bonus only every increases by one point. So, it’s not that big of a loss if you forget. But, since it affects so much of what your character does, it’s important to remember to check when you level up.

How to Increase Your Hit Points & Hit Dice

Now, this is probably the part everyone knows. But, since this is a full guide to leveling up in DnD 5e, we’ll go over it.

When you level up in DnD 5e, your Hit Points increase. You determine by how much it goes up by using your class’ Hit Die and your character’s Constitution modifier. You also gain one more Hit Die from your class.

So, when you level up, you calculate your Hit Point increase like this:

  1. Roll your class’ hit die (or use the average if your DM allows it)
  2. Add your Constitution modifier to that roll
  3. Add the total to your Hit Point Maximum
  4. Increase your total Hit Dice by one using your class’ corresponding die

Like I said, this is the step everyone remembers. But, it’ an important part of leveling up in any DnD game. So, make sure you remember to increase your hit point maximum.

What Class Features Do You Get?

Chances are you’ll remember this (because you’ve been looking forward in awe at all the cool stuff you eventually get from your class). But, here’s a reminder just in case.

Check what class features you get at level up. Now, you won’t always get something (a lot of spellcasters don’t get a ton of them). But, it’s integral to your class’ progression to add a new feature any time you get one.

Many of DnD 5e’s classes get a new feature at every level up.

These could be fairly generic or universal like Fighting Style or Extra Attack. Or, they could be very unique like the Druid’s Wild Shape or the Barbarian’s Danger Sense.

Whatever it is, whenever you level up make sure you check to see if your class gets a new feature.

You don’t want to forget new class features because you’re just leaving something on the table, so to speak. You’re cutting out something your character should be able to do which ends up lessoning their power.

Now, you won’t get a new class feature at every level.

Spellcasters in particular skip class level features a lot. But, they usually get a new spell at these intervals (which I’ll touch on later). So, it kind of balances out.

Do You Get an Ability Score Increase?

Here’s another one almost everyone remembers.

Roughly every four levels, you get an Ability Score Increase (or ASI). At these intervals you get to either add +2 to one Ability Score, +1 to two Ability Scores, or take a Feat (if your DM allows it).

While chances are this is an easy level up thing to remember, you should double check because some classes get them at different intervals. Specifically, the Fighter and Rogue get additional ASIs the other classes don’t.

Just remember to what level your character gets ASIs. And, actually remember to do your increases.

Adjust Any Modifiers (Attack, Initiative, Spell Save DC, Etc)

Now, once you’ve figured out whether you get an ASI or Proficiency Bonus upgrade, adjust all your stats.

Make sure you remember to increase all your numbers. Skills, Attacks, Save DCs, everything. Otherwise, you’re weakening your character for no good reason.

There are a lot of things to check. But, it’s important to check all of them.

So, here’s a list of things to check for adjustment when you level up in DnD 5e:

  • Skill Modifiers
  • Initiative Bonus
  • Passive Perception
  • Norman and Spell Attack Modifiers
  • Spell Save Difficulty Classes
  • Other Save DCs
  • Damage Bonuses
  • Armor Class
  • Movement (Only certain classes)

Chances are you’ll only need to adjust these at certain level ups (like when you get ASIs). And usually, only your number of Hit Dice and Hit Point Maximum will increase at level up. But, it’s important to check just in case.

Do You Get More Spells?

Finally, if you’re playing a spellcaster, check if you get more spells.

Every spellcasting class learns new spells at different rates. Now, some may be similar, but you should check when your specific class gets them. You don’t want to forget grabbing new spells whenever possible.

This is the tradeoff for spellcasters. They usually get less features than other classes, but they’re able to keep adding new spells to their repertoire at almost every level up.

Now, it’s not every level up. But, it’s pretty close.

This is an opportunity for you to fill a gap you might’ve had up until your level up. Which means you can go into the next level better prepared with another damaging spell for combat or something more utility for adventuring. Whatever you think you might need.

Also, check to see if you can switch out spells.

Switching out spells can get a little complicated (see how changing Sorcerer spells in 5e works). But, I recommend you consider which spells were helpful during your adventures and which ones you never used. Because now’s the time to make an exchange.

 

That about covers everything on how to level up in DnD 5e.

  1. Check to see if your Proficiency Bonus increases
  2. Make sure you add one more to your total Hit Dice
  3. Roll or use the average of your Hit Dice to increase your Hit Point Maximum
  4. Check to see if you unlock any racial features
  5. Check to see if you get more class features
  6. Make sure you use your Ability Score Increase at the appropriate levels
  7. Adjust any and all modifiers if applicable
  8. Add or change out your spells known if you’re able to

Remember: always check the Player’s Handbook when you level up.

Any questions you might have about the level up process and the specific level you’re at are there.

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How To Level Up In DnD 5E

All games need some progression, whether that’s a town growing, crafting new weapons, getting more gold, or even a relationship changing between players and NPCs. In DnD, Leveling up is the base for all progression. The higher your level, the further you’ve progressed from your humble (or maybe not so humble) beginnings, and it also helps your DM figure out how to challenge you appropriately.

To start your level up, you first need to… level up. Three methods of which will be detailed at the end. But once you level up, you can start by selecting the class you wish to gain a level in, usually your main class. However, if you have a 13 in the ability score required by both your main class and another class you choose, you could gain a level in that class, though multiclassing is a topic for another article.

Once you have chosen the class, start by increasing your Hit Points either by taking the average of or rolling that classes Hit Die, adding your Constitution Modifier to the result, and then adding that total to your Hit Point Maximum. However, you must add at least 1 Hit Point for each level (Player’s Handbook pg. 15, ‘Beyond 1st Level’ this rule was added in later printings of the PHB and retroactively via errata).

Next, determine if your Proficiency Bonus increases. Your proficiency bonus increases by one after every fourth level (including multiclass), starting at +2 at level 1. So if you reach 5th level, your proficiency bonus increases by 1 to +3. This would also be an excellent time to update the bonuses for any skills or Saving Throws you are proficient in, though your class table contains this information.

After that, look at your new level on the class table for the class you chose to gain a level in, and add any features that appear for that level, updating any resources (such as ki or sorcery points, for example) that appear, and if you are a spellcaster, check your Spellcasting or Pact Magic features for spells you learn and update your spells accordingly.

And congratulations! You have finished leveling up! You can do this in any order you prefer as long as you don’t miss a step. Though now comes the problem of gaining a level in the first place, which your DM typically determines at the start of the campaign.

Experience Leveling (PHB pg. 12; DMG pg. 260-261):

As you resolve encounters, defeat traps, reach certain milestones, or perform other tasks the DM deems available, you gain a varying amount of Experience points spread evenly between all players (Except for absent characters). When you reach a certain amount of experience points as detailed on the table on the referenced pages, you level up.

Milestone Leveling (DMG 261):

When some major event happens -determined by the DM- you level up. Though you could also implement it with Experience as suggested in the referenced page, making certain milestones award several Experience points depending on player level.

Now, of course, you can always homebrew your methods for leveling up, use somebody else’s homebrew, or stick to the standard methods. Each table is different and enjoys different methods. Just because somebody does it one way doesn’t mean you have to do it that same way. One thing that can kill your games quickly is trying too hard to copy somebody word for word. Taking your twists on things is perfectly fine and even the best thing to do in your campaigns. And now, with this knowledge, go and make your games that much better!

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Samuel loves DnD and has been running campaigns over roll20 for over a year. He's quickly learned how best to run a campaign in that period of time. But if there's one thing he loves most about DnD, it's sharing an incredible experience with his friends online.
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How to Level Up (DnD 5e) 

The DM let you know that you leveled up, but you’ve never really done this before. You’re not using an app or something to track your character that can level up for you, you’re using paper and pencils. You want to make sure you don’t miss anything.

Dungeons & Dragons is a big game and it can be daunting to figure out where you need to go and what you need to do to level up. Fifth edition has made this process much easier than its predecessors, though it can still be a lot for newcomers to role playing games. Let us help you through it.

Your Class

Before we unveil a checklist of goodies, first look for your class in the Player’s Handbook to find the level up table. This will note many of both the common and unique benefits you get.

The Checklist, Part 1: Common Benefits

Some things are relevant for all characters to check when leveling up. They are:

  • Hit Point Increase
  • Proficiency Bonus
  • Class Features
  • Subclass Features
  • Ability Score Improvement / Feats

Hit Point Increase!

Your hit points increase by your class’s Hit Die + your Constitution modifier. You can find what kind of hit dice your class uses just below its level up table in the Player’s Handbook. A Paladin, for example, uses d10s for their Hit Dice; such a character would roll a d10, add their Constitution bonus, and then add this result to their existing maximum number of hit points to set a brand new hit point maximum.

Proficiency Bonus?

Every character, no matter what class, gets the same proficiency bonus based on total level. This is meant to ensure everyone scales up in power fairly. You’ll find the proficiency bonus column noted on every class table, but they are in fact all the same. When you level up, check to see if this value increases. If it does, it’s time to boost the bonus for all of your proficient skills as well as for attack rolls. If you’re a spellcaster, your spell save DC also gets a boost now too.

Class feature?

The level up table for your class will have a column of features. Some of these will be generic, abilities that are gained by every character in that class. For example, every kind of Paladin gets “Lay on Hands”, no matter which Sacred Oath they choose. Check the table to see if there is a feature listed, then look for its details later in the class description. There are two types of special features mixed in to this list, which we describe next.

Sub-class feature?

One of the special types of features is subclass features. You choose your subclass somewhere in the first three levels of your class and it gives you unique associated features as you level up later. Subclasses are called different things per class (“Sacred Oath” for a Paladin, “Primal Path” for a Barbarian, “Druid Circle” for a Druid, etc) but they all work the same way. Your level up table will indicate when you get a subclass feature by using its generic term; a Paladin will see that they get a “Sacred Oath” feature multiple times in their features column, for example. Each time you see this, consult the section of the Player’s Handbook with your chosen subclass to find out what new benefit you get.

Ability score improvement?

The other special type of feature is an Ability Score Improvement. This also happens multiple times throughout the level up table. Each class always gains this feature at the same levels, and the first instance is at 4th level. When you see this, you have two options to choose from:

  1. Increase your base stats: Increase one stat by 2, or two stats by 1.
  2. Choose a feat.

Standard feats are found on page 165 of the Player’s Handbook. Beyond this though, other official supplements and home-brew materials provide an immense library of options, some even with particular restrictions. See if any appeal to you and pass them by the DM, especially if something customized. Feat selection can certainly be intimidating, so rest assured that choosing to increase stats instead is a great choice no matter what character you play.

The Checklist, Part 2: Unique Benefits

Some more things are relevant for certain kinds of characters to check. They are:

  • Spells
  • Cantrip Strength
  • Racial Bonuses
  • Extras

Spells

Not all classes get spells, and not all classes get the same kind of spells. This can be especially confusing, so check your level up table and the Spellcasting section of your class description for reference. The major points noted on your level up table are:

  1. Spells Known – Does this increase? If so, you can select a new spell! Your choice(s) are limited to your class’s spell list, the levels for which you have spell slots, and sometimes certain subclass features.
  2. Spell Slots – Do you gain additional slots? Normally when leveling up your magic you either gain more spells or more slots. Spell slots are like your “ammo” for magic; the more you have, the more spells you can cast. If you gain slots for a new level, then you have also just gained access to spells of that level.
  3. Cantrips Known – Does this increase? Cantrips are different than regular spells because you can cast them as much as you want; they do not need slots. Gaining a new choice of cantrip is rare but it does happen. Check your level up table to see if your new level grants you any!

Cantrip Strength

Also for spellcasters, your cantrips that deal damage will increase in strength as you do. This is to make sure your magic powers keep up with the non-magical classes, and occurs at levels 5, 11, and 17. This strength increase is noted directly in the text of the spell itself (not in your level up table), so be sure to remember to check whether your cantrips gain any bonuses when you level.

Racial Bonuses

Some races or subraces grant bonuses when you level up, such as dwarven toughness, drow magic, or a dragonborn’s breath. Take a quick look over your race’s abilities to make sure you aren’t missing anything.

Extras

In your level up table there may be something special we haven’t covered here, and it is most likely unique to your class. Be sure to check the table for improvements in things like:

  • Barbarian Rage
  • Monk Martial Arts/Ki Points/Unarmored Movement
  • Rogue Sneak Attack
  • Sorcery Points
  • Warlock Invocations

Approving Story

Once you’ve reviewed the level up table and gone through our checklist, run your updates by your DM to ensure they agree with everything done and approve choices made. They might even have alternative suggestions that fit the story. Some characters can be quite complex, so having another person double-check your character is always helpful. Recommendations to spell choices, feats, and more can come from veteran players too. Exploring options for your character is a huge part of the game, and it can be really fun to see them emerge and change.

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Level up 5e dnd

The DM lets you know that you levelled up, but you’ve never ever really done this earlier. You’re not using an application or software to track your character that can level up for you, you’re utilizing paper and pencils. You wish to make certain you don’t miss out on anything.

Dungeons & Dragons is a big video game and it can be intimidating to determine where you should move and how to level up. Fifth edition has made this procedure a lot easier than its predecessors, though it can still be a lot for beginners to role playing video games. Let us help you through it.

Level Up Checklist:

  1. Increase your Maximum Health and Hit Die
  2. Look For Ability Score Improvement
  3. Check for Proficiency Improvement
  4. Look for new Class Abilities
  5. Look For Class Ability Improvements
  6. Update HP, Abilities, Skill, and Modifiers Based on Changes
  7. Include any brand-new Spells to your Spell List

How to Level Up DnD 5e

Levelling up might have you looking in numerous places to see what enhancements you get. The fastest way to discover what you require is to look at your class table for level progress. Generally, you will get all the information you require for a level in this one location, except for what spells you will pick. The table itself is compact so do not forget the things it omits, like hit dice improvements.

1. Class-Specific Features:

The class table for level up will contain a feature column. Inspect the table to see if there is a feature listed, then look for its details later in the class description.

2. Sub-class features:

You choose your subclass in the first 3 levels of your class and it offers you distinct associated features as you level up later on. Your level up table will show when you acquire a subclass feature by using its generic term; a Paladin will make sure that they get a “Sacred Oath” feature numerous times in their features column.

3. Hit Point: Class-specific Increase

Your hit points increase by your Constitution modifier + your class Hit Die. You can discover what kind of hit dice your class utilizes just listed below its level up table in the Player’s Handbook. A Paladin, for instance, uses d10s for their Hit Dice; such a character would roll a d10, include their Constitution bonus, and then include this outcome to their existing maximum number of hit indicate set a brand new hit point maximum.

4. Proficiencies:

Every character gets the exact same proficiency reward based upon overall level. This is indicated to guarantee fair scales up in power for everybody. There’ll be a proficiency bonus column on every class table, but they are in fact all the same. When you level up, inspect to see if this worth increases. If it does, it’s time to increase the bonus for all of your skilled abilities in addition to for attack rolls. If you’re a spellcaster, your spell save DC likewise gets an increase now too.

5. Ability Scores:

This also takes place multiple times throughout the level up table. Each class constantly acquires this feature at the exact same levels, and the very first instance is at 4th level.

  1. Increase your base statistics: Increase one stat by 2, or 2 stats by 1.
  2. Choose a feat.

See if any appeal to you and pass them by the DM, particularly if something customized. Feat selection can definitely be frightening, so rest ensured that choosing to increase statistics rather is a fantastic choice no matter what character you play.

6. Spellcasting:

Not every class get spells nor all classes get the very same sort of spells. This can be specifically complicated, so inspect your level up table and the Spellcasting section of your class description for reference. The significant points noted on your level up table are:

  1. Spells Known- Does this increase? If so, you can pick a new spell! Your option( s) are limited to your class’s spell list, the levels for which you have spell slots, and in some cases certain subclass features.
  2. Spell Slots- Typically when levelling up your magic you either gain more spells or more slots. If you gain slots for a new level, then you have likewise simply gained access to spells of that level.
  3. Cantrips Known – Cantrips are different than routine spells since you can cast them as much as you desire; they do not require slots. Check your level up a table to see if your brand-new level grants you any!

7. Racial Rewards:

Some races or subraces grant rewards when you level up, such as drow magic, dragonborn’s breath, or a dwarven toughness. Take a look over your race’s abilities to ensure you aren’t missing out on anything.

Leveling up characters at the table does not need to take a long period of time. Giving gamers checklists, offering resources, and helping them make decisions all go a long way to making the procedure faster and more satisfying for everyone. As a DM you can assist your gamers a lot when it concerns facilitating this process. May all your gamers make it to the next level.

Sours: https://thearcademan.net/dnd-5e-level-up-checklist/
How to Play Dungeons and Dragons 5e - Level Up and Customization

Leveling Up

As your character goes on adventures and overcomes challenges, he or she gains experience, represented by experience points. A character who reaches a specified experience point total advances in capability. This advancement is called gaining a level.

When your character gains a level, his or her class often grants additional features, as detailed in the class description. Some of these features allow you to increase your ability scores, either increasing two scores by 1 each or increasing one score by 2. You can’t increase an ability score above 20. In addition, every character's proficiency bonus increases at certain levels.

Each time you gain a level, you gain 1 additional Hit Die. Roll that Hit Die, add your Constitution modifier to the roll, and add the total to your hit point maximum. Alternatively, you can use the fixed value shown in your class entry, which is the average result of the die roll (rounded up).

When your Constitution modifier increases by 1, your hit point maximum increases by 1 for each level you have attained. For example, if your 7th-level fighter has a Constitution score of 18, when he reaches 8th level, he increases his Constitution score from 17 to 18, thus increasing his Constitution modifier from +3 to +4. His hit point maximum then increases by 8.

The Character Advancement table summarizes the XP you need to advance in levels from level 1 through level 20, and the proficiency bonus for a character of that level. Consult the information in your character's class description to see what other improvements you gain at each level.

Character Advancement

Experience PointsLevelProficiency Bonus
01+2
3002+2
9003+2
2,7004+2
6,5005+3
14,0006+3
23,0007+3
34,0008+3
48,0009+4
64,00010+4
85,00011+4
100,00012+4
120,00013+5
140,00014+5
165,00015+5
195,00016+5
225,00017+6
265,00018+6
305,00019+6
355,00020+6
Sours: https://5thsrd.org/rules/leveling_up/

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D&D 5th Edition

Beyond 1st Level

As your character goes on Adventuresand overcomes challenges, he or she gains experience, represented by Experience Points. A character who reaches a specified experience point total advances in capability. This advancement is called gaining a level

When your character gains a level, his or her class often grants additional features, as detailed in the class description. Some of these features allow you to increase your Ability Scores, either increasing two scores by 1 each or increasing one score by 2. You can’t increase an ability score above 20. In addition, every character’s Proficiency Bonusincreases at certain levels.

Each time you gain a level, you gain 1 additional Hit Die. Roll that Hit Die, add your Constitutionmodifier to the roll, and add the total to your hit point maximum. Alternatively, you can use the fixed value shown in your class entry, which is the average result of the die roll (rounded up).

When your Constitutionmodifier increases by 1, your hit point maximum increases by 1 for each level you have attained. For example, if your 7th-level Fighterhas a Constitutionscore of 17, when he reaches 8th level, he increases his Constitutionscore from 17 to 18, thus increasing his Constitutionmodifier from +3 to +4. His hit point maximum then increases by 8.

The Character Advancementtable summarizes the XP you need to advance in levels from level 1 through level 20, and the Proficiency Bonusfor a character of that level. Consult the information in your character’s class description to see what other improvements you gain at each level.

Experience PointsLevelProficiency Bonus
01+2
3002+2
9003+2
2,7004+2
6,5005+3
14,0006+3
23,0007+3
34,0008+3
48,0009+4
64,00010+4
85,00011+4
100,00012+4
120,00013+5
140,00014+5
165,00015+5
195,00016+5
225,00017+6
265,00018+6
305,00019+6
355,00020+6

Multiclassing

Multiclassingallows you to gain levels in multiple Classes. Doing so lets you mix the Abilitiesof those Classesto realize a character concept that might not be reflected in one of the standard Class Options.

With this rule, you have the option of gaining a level in a new class whenever you advance in level, instead of gaining a level in your current class. Your levels in all your Classesare added together to determine your character level. For example, if you have three levels in Wizardand two in Fighter, you’re a 5th-level character.

As you advance in levels, you might primarily remain a member of your original class with just a few levels in another class, or you might change course entirely, never looking back at the class you left behind. You might even start progressing in a third or fourth class. Compared to a single-class character of the same level, you’ll sacrifice some focus in exchange for versatility.

Prerequisites

To qualify for a new class, you must meet the ability score Prerequisitesfor both your current class and your new one, as shown in the MulticlassingPrerequisitestable. For example, a Barbarianwho decides to multiclass into the druid class must have both Strengthand Wisdomscores of 13 or higher. Without the full Trainingthat a Beginningcharacter receives, you must be a quick study in your new class, having a natural aptitude that is reflected by higher- than-average Ability Scores.


Experience Points

The experience point cost to gain a level is always based on your total character level, as shown in the Character Advancementtable, not your level in a particular class. So, if you are a Cleric6/fighter 1, you must gain enough XP to reach 8th level before you can take your second level as a Fighteror your seventh level as a Cleric.

Hit Points and Hit Dice

You gain the Hit Pointsfrom your new class as described for levels after 1st. You gain the 1st-level Hit Pointsfor a class only when you are a 1st-level character.

You add together the Hit Dice granted by all your Classesto form your pool of Hit Dice. If the Hit Dice are the same die type, you can simply pool them together. For example, both the Fighterand the Paladinhave a d10, so if you are a Paladin5/fighter 5, you have ten d10 Hit Dice. If your Classesgive you Hit Dice of different types, keep track of them separately. If you are a Paladin5/cleric 5, for example, you have five d10 Hit Dice and five d8 Hit Dice.

Proficiency Bonus

Your Proficiency Bonusis always based on your total character level, as shown in the Character Advancementtable, not your level in a particular class. For example, if you are a Fighter3/rogue 2, you have the Proficiency Bonusof a 5th- level character, which is +3.

Proficiencies

When you gain your first level in a class other than your initial class, you gain only some of new class’s starting Proficiencies, as shown in theMulticlassingProficienciestable.

ClassProficiencies Gained
BarbarianShields, simple Weapons, martial Weapons
BardLight armor, one skill of your choice, one musical Instrument of your choice
ClericLight armor, Medium Armor, Shields
DruidLight armor, Medium Armor, Shields (druids will not wear armor or use Shields made of metal)
FighterLight armor, Medium Armor, Shields, simple Weapons, martial Weapons
MonkSimple Weapons, shortswords
PaladinLight armor, Medium Armor, Shields, simple Weapons, martial Weapons
RangerLight armor, Medium Armor, Shields, simple Weapons, martial Weapons, one skill from the class’s skill list
RogueLight armor, one skill from the class’s skill list, thieves’ tools
Sorcerer
WarlockLight armor, simple Weapons
Wizard

Class Features

When you gain a new level in a class, you get its features for that level. You don’t, however, receive the class’s starting Equipment, and a few features have additional rules when you’re multiclassing: Channel Divinity, ExtraAttack, Unarmored Defense, and Spellcasting.

Channel Divinity

If you already have the Channel Divinityfeature and gain a level in a class that also grants the feature, you gain the Channel DivinityEffectsgranted by that class, but getting the feature again doesn’t give you an additional use of it. You gain additional uses only when you reach a class level that explicitly grants them to you. For example, if you are a Cleric6/paladin 4, you can use Channel Divinitytwice between rests because you are high enough level in the Clericclass to have more uses. Whenever you use the feature, you can choose any of the Channel DivinityEffectsavailable to you from your two Classes.

ExtraAttack

If you gain the ExtraAttackclass feature from more than one class, the features don’t add together. You can’t make more than two attacks with this feature unless it says you do (as the fighter’s version of ExtraAttackdoes). Similarly, the warlock’s eldritch invocation Thirsting Bladedoesn’t give you additional attacks if you also have ExtraAttack.

Unarmored Defense

If you already have the Unarmored Defensefeature, you can’t gain it again from another class.

Spellcasting

Your Capacityfor Spellcastingdepends partly on your combined levels in all your SpellcastingClassesand partly on your individual levels in those Classes. Once you have the Spellcastingfeature from more than one class, use the rules below. If you multiclass but have the Spellcastingfeature from only one class, you follow the rules as described in that class.

Spells Known and Prepared: You determine what Spellsyou know and can prepare for each class individually, as if you were a single-classed member of that class. If you are a Ranger4/wizard 3, for example, you know three 1st-level RangerSpellsbased on your levels in the Rangerclass. As a 3rd-level Wizard, you know three WizardCantrips, and your Spellbookcontains ten WizardSpells, two of which (the two you gained when you reached 3rd Levelas a wizard) can be 2nd-level Spells. If your Intelligenceis 16, you can prepare six WizardSpellsfrom your Spellbook.

Each spell you know and prepare is associated with one of your Classes, and you use the Spellcastingability of that class when you cast the spell. Similarly, a Spellcastingfocus, such as a holy Symbol, can be used only for the Spellsfrom the class associated with that focus.

If a cantrip of yours increases in power at higher levels, the increase is based on your character level, not your level in a particular class.

Spell Slots: You determine your available Spell Slots by adding together all your levels in the bard, Cleric, druid, Sorcerer, and WizardClasses, and half your levels (rounded down) in the Paladin and RangerClasses. Use this total to determine your Spell Slots by consulting the Multiclass Spellcastertable.

If you have more than one Spellcasting class, this table might give you Spell Slots of a level that is higher than the Spells you know or can prepare. You can use those slots, but only to cast your lower-level Spells. If a lower-level spell that you cast, like Burning Hands, has an enhanced Effect when cast using a higher-level slot, you can use the enhanced Effect, even though you don’t have any Spells of that higher level.

For example, if you are the aforementioned Ranger 4/wizard 3, you count as a 5th-level character when determining your spell slots: you have four 1st-level slots, three 2nd-level slots, and two 3rd-level slots. However, you don’t know any 3rd-level Spells, nor do you know any 2nd-level RangerSpells. You can use the Spell Slots of those levels to cast the Spells you do know—and potentially enhance their Effects.

Pact Magic: If you have both the Spellcasting class feature and the Pact Magic class feature from the Warlock class, you can use the Spell Slots you gain from the Pact Magic feature to cast Spells you know or have prepared from Classes with the Spellcasting class feature, and you can use the Spell Slots you gain from the Spellcasting class feature to cast WarlockSpells you know.

Lvl.1st2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9th
1st2
2nd3
3rd42
4th43
5th432
6th433
7th4331
8th4332
9th43331
10th43332
11th433321
12th433321
13th4333211
14th4333211
15th43332111
16th43332111
17th433321111
18th433331111
19th433332111
20th433332211

Alignment

A typical creature in the game world has an Alignment, which broadly describes its moral and personal attitudes. Alignmentis a combination of two factors: one identifies morality (good, evil, or neutral), and the other describes attitudes toward Societyand order (lawful, chaotic, or neutral). Thus, nine distinct alignments define the possible combinations.

These brief summaries of the nine alignments describe the typical behavior of a creature with that Alignment. Individuals might vary significantly from that typical behavior, and few people are perfectly and consistently faithful to the precepts of their Alignment.

Lawful good (LG) creatures can be counted on to do the right thing as expected by Society. Gold Dragons, paladins, and most Dwarves are lawful good.

Neutral good(NG) folk do the best they can to help others according to their needs. Many Celestials, some cloud Giants, and most Gnomesare neutral good.

Chaotic good(CG) creatures act as their conscience directs, with little regard for what others expect. Copper Dragons, many elves, and unicorns are chaotic good.

Lawful neutral(LN) individuals act in accordance with law, tradition, or personal codes. Many monks and some wizards are lawful neutral.

Neutral(N) is the Alignmentof those who prefer to steer clear of moral questions and don’t take sides, doing what seems best at the time. Lizardfolk, most druids, and many Humansare neutral.

Chaotic neutral(CN) creatures follow their whims, holding their personal freedom above all else. Many barbarians and rogues, and some bards, are chaotic neutral.

Lawful evil(LE) creatures methodically take what they want, within the limits of a code of tradition, loyalty, or order. Devils, blue Dragons, and Hobgoblinsare lawful evil.

Neutral evil(NE) is the Alignmentof those who do whatever they can get away with, without compassion or qualms. Many drow, some cloud Giants, and Goblinsare neutral evil.

Chaotic evil(CE) creatures act with arbitrary violence, spurred by their greed, Hatred, or bloodlust. Demons, red Dragons, and orcs are chaotic evil.

Alignment in the Multiverse

For many thinking creatures, Alignmentis a moral choice. Humans, Dwarves, elves, and other Humanoidraces can choose whether to follow the paths of good or evil, law or chaos. According to myth, the good- aligned gods who created these races gave them free will to choose their moral paths, knowing that good without free will is slavery.

The evil deities who created Other Races, though, made those races to serve them. Those races have strong inborn tendencies that match the Natureof their gods. Most orcs share the violent, savage Natureof the orc gods, and are thus inclined toward evil. Even if an orc chooses a good Alignment, it struggles against its innate tendencies for its entire life. (Even Half-Orcsfeel the lingering pull of the orc god’s Influence.)

Alignmentis an essential part of the Natureof Celestialsand Fiends. A devil does not choose to be lawful evil, and it doesn’t tend toward lawful evil, but rather it is lawful evil in its essence. If it somehow ceased to be lawful evil, it would cease to be a devil.

Most creatures that lack the Capacityfor rational thought do not have alignments—they are unaligned. Such a creature is incapable of making a moral or ethical choice and acts according to its bestial Nature. Sharks are savage predators, for example, but they are not evil; they have no Alignment.

Languages

Your race indicates the Languagesyour character can speak by default, and your Backgroundmight give you access to one or more additional Languagesof your choice. Note these Languageson your character sheet.

Choose your Languagesfrom the Standard Languagestable, or choose one that is Commonin your campaign. With your GM’s permission, you can instead choose a language from the Standard Languagestable or a Secretlanguage, such as thieves’ cant or the tongue of druids.

Some of these Languagesare actually families of Languageswith many dialects. For example, the Primordiallanguage includes the Auran, Aquan, Ignan, and Terran dialects, one for each of the four elemental planes. Creatures that speak different dialects of the same language can communicate with one another.


Inspiration

Inspirationis a rule the game Mastercan use to reward you for playing your character in a way that’s true to his or her PersonalityTraits, ideal, bond, and flaw. By using Inspiration, you can draw on your Personalitytrait of compassion for the downtrodden to give you an edge in negotiating with the BeggarPrince. Or Inspirationcan let you call on your bond to the Defenseof your home Villageto push past the Effectof a spell that has been laid on you.

Gaining Inspiration

Your GM can choose to give you Inspirationfor a variety of reasons. Typically, GMs award it when you play out your PersonalityTraits, give in to the drawbacks presented by a flaw or bond, and otherwise portray your character in a compelling way. Your GM will tell you how you can earn Inspirationin the game.

You either have Inspirationor you don’t—you can’t stockpile multiple “inspirations” for later use.

Using Inspiration

If you have Inspiration, you can expend it when you make an Attackroll, saving throw, or ability check. Spending your Inspirationgives you advantage on that roll.

Additionally, if you have Inspiration, you can reward another player for good Roleplaying, clever thinking, or simply doing something exciting in the game. When another player character does something that really contributes to the story in a fun and interesting way, you can give up your Inspirationto give that character Inspiration.
Sours: https://roll20.net/compendium/dnd5e/Character%20Advancement


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