Leaving gun in cold car

Leaving gun in cold car DEFAULT

The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: General Handgun Forum > Would keeping a gun in the car damage it or be otherwise dangerous for any reason?


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Hoss Delgado

December 11, 2010, 08:34 PM

This may a dumb question, but I'm just wonder if leaving a gun in the car would be a bad idea. Due to weird state laws, I can legally have one in the car at my age without any permit, but I can't concealed carry. Particularly, would very hot or cold weather mess it up? Also, is there any chance of it going off or something crazy like that?


Alden

December 11, 2010, 08:38 PM

No the heat or cold shouldn't hurt most guns, unless you live in Tucson, or Fairbanks, anyway. :cool:

Will it go off unexpectedly? Why would it? Are we talking about a gun or a home made fertilizer bomb?


jrothWA

December 11, 2010, 08:39 PM

when you not with the car. the only situation to worry is the car catching on fire to go off.

If temperature extremes during the summer may have to change out ammo.


DiscoRacing

December 11, 2010, 08:40 PM

I most generally have three handguns between the front seats,,and four rifles in the back seat....that are in my car everyday all day..they never come out unless im hunting.


Jeremiah/Az

December 11, 2010, 08:42 PM

I leave a Glock in my truck at all times. It gets over 150 degrees in the summer here in a closed truck. It has never hurt the gun or ammo. No, it cannot go off without the trigger being pulled. Hide it when you are out of the vehicle to reduce the chance of theft.


SauerGrapes

December 11, 2010, 08:46 PM

Your right, that's seems like a strange law to me. Are you sure of what the law says?
No matter how or where you store a gun, they all need some maintenence. High humidity isn't good. Cold damp weather isn't good either. You can keep a gun in any type of climate as long as you keep it maintained properly.
I have a handgun hidden in my damp basement, but I regularly wipe it down and keep it oiled.
Me personally, I would never leave a gun in a vehicle unattended for long periods of time.{like overnight} Somehow, someway, the wrong person will find out you keep a gun in your car and try to steal it. That's my thinking anyway.


Alden

December 11, 2010, 08:49 PM

The only thing I ever worry about is theft. Hide it and hope for the best.

Disco, seven guns in your vehicle at all times? That seems like maybe one too many to me. :D


BILLtheDJguy

December 11, 2010, 08:49 PM

Shoot, one too few....lol

PLease recite the following phrase until it is tattooed on your brain...
"When it comes to firearms, there is no such thing, as too many."


DiscoRacing

December 11, 2010, 08:54 PM

We shoot alot....I have a ruger redhawk, 5906, and taurus raging bull in 45LC between the front seats,,and moss 500 .410, ruger .223, savage .22-250 and howa 30-06 in the back seat...needless to say I cant carry passengers.:cool:


James K

December 11, 2010, 09:19 PM

Very long term storage (years) in high temperature conditions can affect the primers, so I would change out the ammo every so often, fire the old rounds and load fresh.

DiscoRacing, the others are right; theft should be a concern. Some naughty folks would tear that car apart if they knew you had that many guns in there.

Jim


candr44

December 11, 2010, 09:23 PM

I have kept a gun in a holster in my center console for more than a year. I take it out once in a while to shoot it and it always works perfectly. The heat of Florida's summer and cold of winter don't seem to affect it.

If you are going to have kids in the car, make sure they can't get to the gun if you step out for a minute. Also, its not likely to go off but just the same make sure its pointed away from anyone.


m&p45acp10+1

December 11, 2010, 09:52 PM

Your two biggest threats to your gun that is left in the car are.
1 Theft. A lot of guns are stolen from cars. If you have a way to secure it in a manner that would discourage a thief from spending the time and energy to unsecure it that would be preferable.
2 Rust and corrosion from neglect. Those two are preventable with a touch of oil for the gun, and shooting up the ammo and replacing it every so often. (Besides it gives you an excuse to shoot.:D)


Bill DeShivs

December 12, 2010, 03:14 AM

While the theft of a gun is never good, it's YOUR car. No one has the right to steal it. I refuse to see how some people think that if you leave YOUR gun in YOUR car it's irresponsible. It's really not. You are doing nothing illegal-the thief is. Lock your car, use a vehicle safe if possible, or hide the gun well when the car is unattended. These are your responsibilities.
If someone broke into your home and stole your gun would you blame yourself? I doubt it. Why would anyone think differently about a car?


Amin Parker

December 12, 2010, 03:55 AM

You guys sure are lucky. In my country, if you leave your firearm in your vehicle and the cops find it you will be found 'unfit to possess' which means you will never be able to own another gun for the rest of your life.

If your gun is stolen from your car, besides the above, you WILL be charged with criminal negligence.

Your guns can only be one of 2 places. In a safe thats bolted to a wall or floor, or on your person in a holster or bag.

I wish it could be different. It would be nice to have a gun in the car. That way i can be out and about with a pocket pistol and have something significant in the car.


Hook686

December 12, 2010, 03:57 AM

One hazard of keeping a gun in your car, I would think, would to become not alert to it. By that I mean you could simply not think about it and drive into, or onto a, 'Gunfree Zone', such as school grounds, federal property, or other such restricted area.


Kreyzhorse

December 12, 2010, 08:26 AM

There is no danger to keeping a gun in your car due to weather.

Theft and rust due to neglect are the only real possible dangers, both of which can be prevented with a little attention.

A well hidden gun and a locked vehicle without any valuables in sight will help with possible theft. As far as rust, as long as you maintain gun (oil and clean it) on a regular basis that should keep it rust free.


Cheapshooter

December 12, 2010, 11:22 AM

Due to weird state laws, I can legally have one in the car at my age without any permit, but I can't concealed carry.

OP did not mention what state, but in Missouri anyone at least 21 years of age who can legally posses a firearm can carry concealed in a vehicle without a permit, but you have to be 23 to get a Missouri CCW permit. The loophole, Utah CCW permits are reciprocal, and you can get one by mail at the age of 21. Most CCW classes in Missouri will provide everything needed for the Utah permit with your training. If you are not in Missouri, check the laws in your state. You might be able to do the same there.

One word of caution about keeping a handgun in your car. Get one of these: http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=274442
You don't want some scumbag breaking into your car and stealing your gun to use in a violent crime.
Lock it up when you leave your car parked.


Hoss Fly

December 12, 2010, 11:25 AM

I leave a Russian Makarov in my trucks console 24/7 loaded right up to its ears :)
I figure its every bit as safe as all the electronics that are more exposed than it is -


Spats McGee

December 12, 2010, 11:38 AM

You guys sure are lucky. In my country, if you leave your firearm in your vehicle and the cops find it you will be found 'unfit to possess' which means you will never be able to own another gun for the rest of your life.

If your gun is stolen from your car, besides the above, you WILL be charged with criminal negligence.

Your guns can only be one of 2 places. In a safe thats bolted to a wall or floor, or on your person in a holster or bag. . . . .
I'm curious. Can you carry a pistol on your person if you're in the car?


Ozzieman

December 12, 2010, 11:43 AM

Cold weather mess it up?
The one thing you want to watch for is in very cold weather when your gun sets in the car for hours at a time and gets down to the outside temperature, each time you warm it up its going to collect moisture. I make sure that when I bring it in to the house after setting for hours cold in a holster to remove it from the holster and once it has warmed up I use Silicone treatment and wipe down the outer surface and give it a good inspection.
To me moisture can be one of the worse things that can damage a gun due to temperature extremes. I have a friend that last year he sat an older Winchester lever action in 45 LC under some blankest in his closet.
He sat the gun flat on the floor on the carpeting in a corner closet. Then set a bunch of blankets no top. This was his home self defense gun that he thought was well hidden yet easy to get to.
He let set there for most of the winter.
He called me up asking for help. The guns finish was completely ruined. Surface rust covered over 50 % of the NIB gun. Some of the receiver had pits. The barrel was also damaged inside.
Very expensive lesion learned.


chris in va

December 12, 2010, 12:46 PM

Irresponsible to keep a gun in the car, except when you're not allowed to bring it with you (work, post office, bar etc).

You don't want some scumbag breaking into your car and stealing your gun to use in a violent crime.

This.


Onward Allusion

December 12, 2010, 12:53 PM

Hoss Delgado
Would keeping a gun in the car damage it or be otherwise dangerous for any reason?
This may a dumb question, but I'm just wonder if leaving a gun in the car would be a bad idea. Due to weird state laws, I can legally have one in the car at my age without any permit, but I can't concealed carry. Particularly, would very hot or cold weather mess it up? Also, is there any chance of it going off or something crazy like that?

Changes in temp will not damage your firearm as long as it is well oiled and secured properly. As for going off by itself, maybe in a fire. The other worry is having it stolen, but to each their own. Sometimes one has to take the risk. What's worst - having it stolen or having you dead? You gotta decide.


Buzzcook

December 12, 2010, 01:55 PM

Humidity is the danger to guns in cars. Rapid changes in temperature will attract water to metal.


Cheapshooter

December 12, 2010, 02:20 PM

Irresponsible to keep a gun in the car, except when you're not allowed to bring it with you (work, post office, bar etc).

That is why I gave the link to the lock box. Easier than explaining it. It isn't 100%, but most thefts from cars are smash & grabs. They don't take the time or have the tools to cut the cable.


bob.a

December 12, 2010, 03:07 PM

Your danger comes from lawyers. If the gun is stolen and used to injure someone, you will be sued. If it is used in a crime, the perp's family will sue you for enabling him to get a weapon. If you live in a state full of libtards, the DA might try to make you an accessory.

Please don't bother telling me how unfair this is. I already know that.


Bill DeShivs

December 12, 2010, 03:33 PM

Horsecrap. You have no control over an item that is stolen from you. States like New Jersey and California may be an exception- but any decent lawyer could refute this.


WESHOOT2

December 12, 2010, 04:25 PM

Rust is my only issue.


K_Mac

December 12, 2010, 06:14 PM

Illinois has some of the most repressive gun laws in the country. In Illinois a weapon must be in a case and unloaded during transport. Concealed carry is illegal. It may not be irresponsible to leave a weapon in the vehicle, but I would not want to deal with the legal/civil issues if one was stolen from one of my mine.


Cheapshooter

December 12, 2010, 07:15 PM

Horsecrap. You have no control over an item that is stolen from you. States like New Jersey and California may be an exception- but any decent lawyer could refute this.

But it doesn't hurt to take every precaution like the lock box I mentioned. Theft deterrent, and extra legal defense.


PT-92

December 12, 2010, 08:51 PM

Outside of theft, no worries.

-Happy Holidays


raftman

December 12, 2010, 10:33 PM

One possible concern would be if it gets rather cold, and the gun has been in the car for a long time in said cold, if you decided to bring the gun into the house or whatever (assuming the house is warm) then you'll get condensation to worry about.


Iron Man

December 13, 2010, 01:59 AM

I have specific guns that are my "car" guns. In Kentucky, if you do not have a CCDW permit, the only place you can legally carry a gun (besides the trunk) is your factory glovebox. The console doesn't count.


warningshot

December 13, 2010, 02:38 AM

The LEO might let you skate, TFL will let you skate. Leave a loaded gun in the car...someone gets hurt...Kiss yer butt good-bye in Civil Court...all 50 States...pucker-up.


Skans

December 13, 2010, 08:29 AM

The right gun won't be damaged by leaving it in the car. I leave my little AMT .45 Backup in the car when I don't carry it. Its easy enough for me to keep it locked up and still access it if I really need to. If I lived in an area that had lots of car break-ins, I wouldn't do this.


hhb

December 14, 2010, 07:31 AM

Make sure you scrape off the NRA and "Cold Dead Fingers" bumper stickers if you leave a firearm in a vehicle.


Skans

December 14, 2010, 04:26 PM

deleted - wrong thread.:o


RichC

December 14, 2010, 04:51 PM

Not sure if this has been mentioned, but as a father of three kids I think it is important to consider.

Does anyone else drive the car? If so, are they legally able to possess a firearm?

My oldest daughter has her CCW license, so that is not a problem. However her younger brother and sister are under 21 and cannot possess a handgun. If I left one in the trunk, and they were to drive off with the car, it could cause a terrible legal mess if it were discovered by LE.

Better safe than sorry. And I'm from Massachusetts where the laws are pretty darn awful... I'm not sure how other state laws would apply.


imthegrumpyone

December 21, 2010, 02:56 AM

It'll get a complex from being left alone ! :rolleyes:


dogngun

December 23, 2010, 10:36 AM

a few years ago because he left a gun in his car while he went somewhere in a building, and it had been stolen when he returned, along with several re-loads of ammo.

I'd rather carry a smaller one along with me unless it's impossible, or at least find a decent place to hide the gun if I had to leave it...but I'd never leave a gun in a car overnight or permanently - too many people like to steal from cars.

mark


jimbob86

December 23, 2010, 11:31 AM

Theft would be one concern. I would not do it on that account. Guns are expensive- I would not leave a wallet with 700$ in it in the car, just in case I ever might need it, would I?


Civil liability: even if you hire a good lawyer and successfully defend yourself, it ain't gonna be cheap: Lawyers cost in the hundreds of dollars per hour, and somehow litigation just seems top drag on and on. Keeping it on you or in a safe is the cheaper option.

The odds of it being stolen are far greater than you ever needing it for self defense. And if you think you need to Carry a gun, Carry it. A gun in your car won't save you if you are not in your car, and you'd have a hard time proving to a court that you could not have just driven away if your life was threatened, if you don't live in a "No Duty To Retreat" state.

Fluctuating temps make for rust, and wide temp swings are not good on powders .......

150 degree powder temp won't "cook off" but it'll sure spike pressures....... will your gun function normally at that temp? Some loads are on the raggedy edge of safe pressures at normal temps. Put that ammo in a 150+ degree car, and what do you suppose will happen when you fire it? I don't want to find out, at least with my guns.


doc540

December 23, 2010, 12:16 PM

re: car carry

Those who have reasons not to "car carry", don't do it.

I have my reasons to car carry, so I do.

$25 mount
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/doc540/Guns/Auto%20Mount/DSCN0854-1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/doc540/Guns/Auto%20Mount/DSCN0870-1.jpg

This FEG PA-63 will be on car duty beginning next week. It's worth leas than $200 and will serve its purpose very well.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/doc540/Guns/FEG%20PA-63/DSCN3646-1.jpg


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Michigan Gun Owners Community Forum > Firearms Issues/Discussions > General Firearms Discussion > Leaving gun in car in frigid temps?


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yooper1

12-05-2008, 08:33 PM

Well, winter has arrived with a vengance.

-3 degrees this morning.

I have a CPL and like to carry.

My employer does not allow weapons in the building at work.

No problem in your car.

Problem I have is....do I dare leave my handgun locked in the car while I am in work with the temps being so cold?

I have one of those under the seat lock boxes attached by cable so the gun never touches snow or water, but it does not stop the frigid temps.

Will the cold then warm and cold then warm, day in and day out for the next 70 + days in winter hurt the pistol at all?

Will any condensation happen?

Should I use a different lube other than birchwood gun lube?

I have a Bersa .380 model 83 with the nickel finnish & wood grips

What's your thoughts?

Leave it home?

OR

Keep it in the car cuz you never know?


Thanks for your input

Gary


TNT.45

12-05-2008, 08:45 PM

Just carry and do not tell your employer or anyone else. I would rather lose my CPL or Job than my life. Violence in the workplace is a very real thing.(or anywhere else for that matter)

To answer your car question. It will not hurt your gun to be in the cold. Yes condensation can and will happen with the heat & freeze cycles. Although most gun oils will protect it just fine.


Keep a soft padded zip up type pistol case in the car in the cold and put the pistol in it before you take it in the house. If you leave it in there for a while it will warm up slowly and shouldn't get condensation.


Super Trucker

12-05-2008, 10:51 PM

I would think it would be no different than a cop out of the car for a while in the cold, directing traffic or working an accident for an hour or two, then getting back in a warm car?

Of course I have been wrong before.


Kimberguy1371

12-06-2008, 01:37 AM

the cold will not bother it, condensation is no big deal, if you clean it once per week, you'll never have to worry about that. I worry more about sweat in the summer. but think about how hot that gun gets at the range? and it cools at room temperature, if it gets cold, no different, just let it adjust, and you'll be fine.


RifleGuy

12-06-2008, 02:55 AM

But when you slip that block of icy steel inside our waistband, and that cold, cold slide caresses your skin, the abrupt and violent intake of air could pose a risk to small dogs, children, and low-flying aircraft.


yooper1

12-06-2008, 04:09 AM

yup

it definitely will be cold

I better not have wet hands when I grab it.


tiburondriver47

12-06-2008, 04:25 AM

yup

it definitely will be cold

I better not have wet hands when I grab it.
Or stick your tongue on it :P


yooper1

12-06-2008, 04:33 AM

Or stick your tongue on it :P
I HATE when that happens!


who dat

12-06-2008, 10:50 AM

Would desiccant help? Seems like it would.


Keep a soft padded zip up type pistol case in the car in the cold and put the pistol in it before you take it in the house. If you leave it in there for a while it will warm up slowly and shouldn't get condensation.

Those types of cases can actually hold moisture and increase the risk of corrosion. Most even warn you of that on the tags that come with them when new.


Would desiccant help? Seems like it would.

You would have to dry out the desiccant every day. As it acquires moisture it becomes less, and less effective.


Keep in mind - metal and plastic are relatively impervious to hot/cold transitions, but wooden grips are likely to crack under the conditions you describe.


Joeywhat

12-06-2008, 03:55 PM

As long as the temp changes are not sudden, I would not worry about it.


Those types of cases can actually hold moisture and increase the risk of corrosion. Most even warn you of that on the tags that come with them when new.

I haven't had a problem with moisture at all. I don't leave the gun always stored in it though either, storing a gun in them can cause problems. The temperature change is slow and condensation is not a problem. ymmv

Then again if the car is cold it's going to warm up slowly and you probably won't get condensation anyhow. I wouldn't worry about it.


yooper1

12-06-2008, 08:24 PM

ok

thanks everyone

now to ponder and decide


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Winter presents unique challenges for everyone and everything, especially when you’re experiencing a “bombogenesis”. So, obviously having a working firearm is crucial in any situation. Ask the Marines at the Chosin Reservoir as their guns froze and ceased to function. Troops have long realized that harsh winters require special weapons attention. If you’re a shooter, prepper, or concerned at all about weapon’s maintenance you need to know how to deal with winter.

Related: USAFDevelopedANewBombthatCreatesGeneralDarkness: “CHAMP”

Step 1 – Some Lubes Suck

I won’t name names, but certain lubricants simply don’t work well in the winter and fall. Mostly those based on vegetable oils. These oils like to gum up when it gets cold and until your weapon gets hot these lubricants are quite worthless. So the first step is to get rid of these gummy lubricants. If you don’t, you risk weapon’s failure. Cleaning this gunk out of the small crevices of your gun is a real pain, but needs to be done.

Even petroleum based lubes can harden and became more of a hassle than a blessing. You see lubes are meant to function in extreme heat. Guns run hot, and lubricants are designed to function within that realm of heat and to reduce friction between metal on metal parts. They aren’t designed to last in cold weather… so they don’t.

Step 2 – Remove those Old Lubes

Simply not using these lubes isn’t enough. You need to strip your guns of every single bit of lube on them as winter starts. Get an old t shirt, cut it to pieces and start cleaning them. Really get in as deep as you can and get that gunk out of there. Believe it or not you can run a gun with extremely little lube. If you are firing hundreds of rounds at a time go ahead and lube the gun before you shoot. Just remember after using it go ahead and break the weapon down and strip the lube out of the weapon.

Now if you’re like me your hunting rifle isn’t likely to be fired a whole lot during the hunting season. It’s unlikely to become dirty and fired so many times I really need to worry about lubrication. If you aren’t shooting hundreds or thousands of rounds at a time the external cold weather is going to prevent the gun from getting too hot.

Related: HowtoBuildanEMPEmergencyCarBag

Step 3 – Condensation is the Enemy a.k.a. the Most Important Cleaning Step

Here is the real threat when it comes to winter maintenance. When you go out in the cold, sit in a tree stand, or deer blind things get cold. Your gun gets cold, you get cold, the world gets cold. So what do you do? You get warm? You head inside your home, the cabin, etc. Your nice warm escape from the frigid outdoors. While you warm up your gun is to and it’s experiencing condensation.

Condensation is what happens when you bring your gun in from the cold. Air carries moisture, and when it gets too cold the air can no longer contain the moisture. It builds up inside and outside of the gun and when it gets warm the moisture will materialize on the weapon, and inside the weapon. This isn’t a good thing.

The absolute best winter cleaning technique involves something quite simple. Disassemble the weapon and take a piece of cloth and dry it out. This piece of cloth needs to be clean and lubricant free. You need to dry the inside and outside of the weapon and  make sure you keep condensation at bay. You want to get the outside, the inside and every single small part possible. You want to dry the gun within the first 5 minutes of bringing it into a warmer environment.

Related: HowtoConcealWeaponsinYourVehicle

Step 4 – Don’t Forget the Ammo

Keeping the gun clean is one thing, but you need to keep the ammo clean and dry as well. In fact you need to inspect your ammo on occasion. The thin nature of brass means it’s easily cracked. Exposing thin metal to hot and then cold environments can cause some issues with cracking. You can also expect primers to pop out and bullets to take a weird angle in their cases.

Related: IAskedaFriendWhatIShouldStockpileforSHTF:TheGreat.223RemingtonOrTheStalwart.308Winchester?

Inspect the ammo, make sure it’s normal and ready to rock and roll. Bad ammo could damage your gun, cause a jam, or simply go click when you really, really need a bang. Inspecting and making sure your ammo isn’t corroded or damaged is important. Wipe it down just like you wipe down your gun’s parts.

Step 5 – Inspect, inspect and inspect

Make sure that any rifle you’re keeping in storage is prepped for winter. Sure it may not be a gun you use daily, or one you use occasionally, but it should be prepped for winter. Clean the lube off, and at least once a week inspect the guns for moisture or rust. Take your time and check the inside and outside of every weapon. Taking 5 minutes to inspect and dry your guns will keep you from hours of scrubbing and rubbing out rust.

Winter is Coming

Winter is a big deal for a lot of people, and for gun people it creates specific challenges. Hunters, recreational shooters, and gun owners in general need to hit the ground running when it comes to winter firearm’s maintenance. Get ahead of the curve, and be ready for the snow, the sleet, and those subzero temperatures. Just remember step 3, keep your gun dry!

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Myth Guns Stored In Hot Vehicles

Cold Weather And Handguns: Do Freezing Temperatures Affect Firearm Function?

A reader recently wrote in and asked us to do a segment on the effects of freezing temperatures on concealed carry handguns. The issue comes up as we head into the deep winter months and temperatures routinely plunge down below freezing. For those who leave a handgun in a vehicle — especially if you work in a place you don’t carry — a natural caution arises if the handgun is left out in freezing conditions.

In most cases, the real issue isn’t going to be the firearm itself. Unless you are dealing with -35° F and your gun is exposed to the elements, you have little to worry about. I’ll address steps I recommend to ensure you minimize any issues.

Sub-Zero Temperatures And Handguns

With a revolver, the main caution is condensation built up around the hammer and the cylinder. We’re talking extremely cold temperatures before these issues will ever appear. The biggest thing you can do to prevent this is remove any excess lubrication you have on the revolver. At extreme cold temperatures (T < 0° F), lubricants begin to gum up. Use only the amount of lubricant you need to clean the firearm and wipe off any excess prior to carrying.

The same is true for pistols. If you expect to run into sub-zero or single digit temperatures, remove any excess lubrication from the pistol. With pistols, you generally have a recoil spring, recoil rod, and a trigger housing group that can become susceptible to gumming up at extremely low, negative temperatures. The chances of these freezing outright is minimal unless they are left exposed to the elements for extended periods of time. Lubricant will become gummy at extremely low temperatures and potentially be a sticking point — no pun intended — if you need to fire the pistol.

Short answer: Keep your lubrication extremely minimal. A dry, cold handgun shouldn’t run into any issues. Keep your pistol insulated and protected from exposure.

NOTE: There are lubricants that are purported to work at extremely low temperatures. I don’t have any personal experience with them so I’m not going to comment on whether or not I can recommend them.

The next big factor is condensation.

Freezing Up Firearms Through Condensation

Air contains moisture. As temperatures drop, the air can no longer hold onto water as well and the water forms a thin solid layer against other solid surfaces. When we talk metal-on-metal contact, this can present a small problem. A handgun CAN freeze or lock up due to condensation build up but generally one of two things will have needed to happen before this becomes a factor.

Two major situations a gun owner may contend with:

  1. Bringing a gun from a hot environment to a cold one.

Bringing a gun from relative extreme heat (50-70° F) to extreme cold (T < 32° F) can cause a layer of frost to develop on exposed surfaces. If you carry inside the waistband from inside a warm enclosure to the outside, this really isn’t as much of an issue.

Heck, even if you carry in an OWB holster, this isn’t usually a big problem so long as it’s underneath your jacket or an insulating layer.

If you’re outside for lengthy periods of time, so long as your handgun is in an insulated holster or compartment, you should be fine.

If your handgun was sitting exposed to the elements for lengthy periods of time, you would notice frost form. Wipe it off with a dry cloth.

Easy fix: don’t leave your handgun exposed to the elements. If the handgun is not in your direct possession, put an insulating layer around it. If frost forms on the surfaces of your gun, wipe it off with a dry cloth.

  1. Bringing a gun from a cold environment to a hot one.

Anyone that wears glasses instantly knows the pain of walking into a warm room from the cold outdoors. Your lenses fog up. This condensation can be annoying. However, of the two situations, this one is probably the easiest to fix. Wait until your handgun has warmed up to above freezing temperatures and wipe away any excess moisture. If necessary, disassemble and wipe away any condensation that formed on its internal components.

In almost all cases, handgun malfunctions due to extreme cold weather conditions can be prevented by minimizing exposure to the open cold, using only enough lubricant to clean the firearm, and regularly cleaning and maintaining the firearm to minimize condensation build-up on surfaces.

Have a safe and wonderful winter! Carry everyday, everywhere you can.

GH is a Marine Corps veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom and has served as a defense contractor in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. His daily concealed carry handgun is a Glock 26 in a Lenwood Holsters Specter IWB or his Sig Sauer SP2022 in a Dara Holsters Appendix IWB holster.

View all posts by G. Halek

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Sours: https://concealednation.org/2016/12/cold-weather-and-handguns-do-freezing-temperatures-affect-firearm-function/

In leaving cold car gun

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