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Aquifer Basics


What is an aquifer and what is groundwater?

An aquifer is any water-saturated rock or sediment body that contains sufficient quantities of water, for example, enough to supply water to a city or a single residence. This water, called groundwater, occupies the pore spaces, cracks, and spaces between soil and rock particles. In most cases, aquifers are not underground rivers.

Water movement in aquifers is highly dependent on the permeability of the aquifer material or how well the pore spaces or cracks are interconnected. In some permeable aquifers, groundwater may move several feet in a day; in other places, it moves only a few inches in a century. Groundwater moves very slowly through relatively impermeable materials such as clay and shale.

Water in an aquifer can be discharged into springs, streams, or withdrawn from the ground by wells. This discharged water must be replaced by new water to replenish or recharge the aquifer. Thus, every aquifer has a recharge zone or zones.

The boundaries of an aquifer are sometimes difficult to define and commonly merge with the boundaries of other aquifers, forming an aquifer system.  If the top of an aquifer is the water table, then the aquifer is called an unconfined aquifer.  If an aquifer has at least one layer of clay or low-permeability sediment at its top, it is called a confined aquifer. Water in a confined aquifer, if tapped by a well or spring, will rise above the top of the aquifer and may flow from the well or spring onto the land surface under artesian pressure. In this case, the aquifer is called an artesian aquifer.

Pumping can affect the level of the water table

If an aquifer is shallow enough and permeable enough to allow water to move through it at a rapid-enough rate, then people can drill wells into it and withdraw water. The level of the water table can naturally change over time due to changes in weather cycles and precipitation patterns, streamflow and geologic changes, and even human-induced changes, such as an increase in impervious surfaces on the landscape and over pumping.

The pumping of wells can have a great deal of influence on water levels below ground, especially in the vicinity of the well, as this diagram shows. If water is withdrawn from the ground at a faster rate that it is replenished, either by infiltration from the surface of from streams, then the water table can become lower, resulting in a “cone of depression” around the well. Depending on geologic and hydrologic conditions of the aquifer, the impact on the level of the water table can be short-lived or last for decades, and it can fall a small amount or many hundreds of feet. Excessive pumping can lower the water table so much that the wells no longer supply water—they can “go dry.”

What is the hydrologic cycle?

The hydrologic cycle is a description of the generic reservoirs of water on earth including moisture in the atmosphere, water in plants and animals, lakes, rivers, wetlands, polar ice caps and glaciers, groundwater, oceans and seas and how water moves between these reservoirs in various forms (gas, liquid, solid).  It is an interconnected cycle – water falls as precipitation, is used by plants and animals, infiltrates into the ground, and is evaporated and transpired back into the atmosphere. All the water that has ever existed on earth moves through this continuous cycle.

Because of these interconnections, human effects on the hydrologic cycle can cause problems.  For example, groundwater extraction from shallow aquifers can alter stream flows.  And conversely, diversion of water from streams and rivers for irrigation can have a major impact on local groundwater tables, causing water levels to decline.

Some information on this page is from “Ground Water and the Rural Homeowner, Pamphlet”, U.S. Geological Survey, by Roger M. Waller, 1982.

Protect Our Aquifer…..We Drink It!

 

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Sours: https://www.bannockcounty.us/groundwater/aquifer-basics/

Current conditions at selected sites based on the most recent data from on-site automated recording equipment. Measurements are commonly recorded at a fixed interval of 15- to 60-minutes and transmitted to the USGS every hour. Values may include "Approved" (quality-assured data that may be published) and/or more recent "Provisional" data (of unverified accuracy and subject to revision). Most current data are provisional.

The same data accessed by the Current Conditions link above but including both active and discontinued sites with data for any part of the period October 1, 2007, through the present. Values may include "Approved" (quality-assured data that may be published) and/or more recent "Provisional" data (of unverified accuracy and subject to revision).

Summary of all data for each day for the period of record and may represent the daily mean, median, maximum, minimum, and/or other derived value. Values may include "Approved" (quality-assured data that may be published) and/or more recent "Provisional" data (of unverified accuracy and subject to revision). Example.

Statistics are computed from approved daily mean data at each site. These links provide summaries of approved historical daily values for daily, monthly, and annual (water year or calendar year) time periods.

Manual measurements of depth to water in wells.
Sours: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/gw
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Appendix IV

GROUNDWATER BASINS IN BOUNDARY COUNTY

 

Data Sources:

Groundwater is widespread in Boundary County, but has received very little study, and information about its quality or distribution is very limited. Neither the Idaho Department of Water Resources nor the Idaho State Geological Survey have published any reports on groundwater in the county. Neither these agencies nor the Panhandle Health District have organized the information in their files regarding groundwater quality throughout the county in a way that is accessible to their staff or the general public. However, the DEQ maintains a website that includes some of the water quality and other data on all public water supply systems in the county. The data are contained in “Source Water Assessment Reports” that were completed between 2000 and 2003 and can be viewed online. The Idaho Department of Water Resources maintains a website that includes a database of well driller’s logs that can be accessed for information on the depth to groundwater in individual wells. Due to the limited availability of official groundwater reports for Boundary County, these two databases were used to perform a cursory analysis of the occurrence of groundwater in the county and develop the following discussion of groundwater basins and aquifers. The analysis included the construction of well-log cross sections in various parts of the county. These sections can be viewed at the Boundary County Planning Department.

 

Although the DEQ map identifies watershed sub-basins (hydrologic units) and separate aquifers, the DEQ has not officially identified any distinct groundwater basins within Boundary County. However, examination of surface geological and topographic maps and subsurface well logs indicates that separate or partially separate groundwater basins probably exist.

 Purcell Trench Groundwater Basin:

One of the main geographic features of Boundary County is the large valley that trends north-south through the center of the county from the Canadian border into Bonner County. This valley, commonly referred to as the Purcell Trench, is a deep, fault-bounded basin that lies between the Selkirk Range on the west and the Purcell Range on the east. Several hundred feet of glacial and an unknown thickness of pre-glacial sediment were deposited in this basin, and this sediment comprises the main aquifers in Boundary County. These aquifers receive their water from precipitation that falls in the mountains and on the valley floor and then percolates downward and flows slowly toward the basin. Regionally, groundwater flows eastward from the Selkirk Range and mostly westward from the Cabinet and Purcell Ranges. In the east-central portion of the county where the Kootenai River has eroded its valley through the Cabinet-Purcell Range, groundwater probably flows southward from the Purcell Range and northward from the Cabinet Range. The DEQ identifies the Purcell Trench as IDAQUIFER #3 and shows it as part of watershed sub-basin 17010104.

Various geologic features of the Purcell Trench interrupt this regional groundwater flow and separate the basin into smaller sub-basins that have locally different groundwater flow patterns. These sub-basins may have slightly different aquifers, water tables and water chemistry. A few of these are discussed below; others may exist that were not identified during this preliminary examination of groundwater resources in Boundary County.

Highland Flats Sub-Basin:

The southern portion of Boundary County is more mountainous than the rest of the county. The Selkirk Range occupies the west half of the county and the Cabinet Range encompasses the east half. The Selkirk Range consists primarily of very hard, crystalline granitic rock that is non-water bearing except very locally in fracture zones (the IDAQUIFER #2 portion of watershed sub-basin 17010104). The Cabinet Mountains are underlain by hard, well-cemented, fine-grained sedimentary rocks that have been slightly metamorphosed and recrystallized. These rocks also have little or no pore space, but like the granitic rocks of the Selkirk Range are locally water-bearing where fractured (IDAQUIFER #10 and #11). Because both ranges are elevated and contain few, poor-quality aquifers, they are not considered to be groundwater basins.

 

In the southern part of the county, the Purcell Trench groundwater basin is less than a mile wide. The western half of the basin in this area is known as the Highland Flats, which is a relatively flat plateau at a surface elevation of between 2,200 and 2,300 feet. Well-log data suggest that Highland Flats forms a small groundwater sub-basin that is partially separated from the main portion of the groundwater basin by a topographic ridge of granitic bedrock that is partly buried and partly exposed. This ridge is bounded on the west, and probably on the east, by faults (Miller and Burmester, 2003). The highest point on this ridge is Round Mountain at an elevation of 2,851 feet. The western margin of the sub-basin is the Selkirk Range.

 

Highland Flats is underlain by between 20 and 30 feet of fine-grained brown sediment that is generally non-water bearing. Beneath this is a zone of at least 200 feet of blue clay that was deposited in an ancient lake during glacial times more than 10,000 years ago. This clay is also non-water bearing. Hence, there are no aquifers in Highland Flats that are shallower than about 200 feet.

 

The lake deposit forms a confining layer for an aquifer that underlies it. This means that groundwater beneath the confining layer is under upward pressure, and when a well is drilled through the confining layer into the underlying aquifer, groundwater will rise in the well above the level of the aquifer. Therefore, the depth to water in the well is less than the depth of the water-producing zone. In Highland Flats, the aquifer that underlies the lake clay is a zone of sand and gravel. In the wells that have been studied, this zone occurs at a depth ranging from 250 to 400 feet and is 20 feet thick or less. Due to variations in pressure and aquifer characteristics, the depth to groundwater in these wells is highly variable. The aquifer produces groundwater at rates ranging from approximately 10 to 60 gallons per minute (gpm). Underlying it is a thin zone of weathered granitic bedrock, which also produces limited quantities of groundwater in some wells.

 

This zone is as much as 50 feet thick, but produces at a rate of only 1-2 gpm. None of the public water systems listed in the Public Services, Facilities and Utilities section are located within Highland Flats, and therefore the DEQ database provides no information about the chemistry of this groundwater.

 

Paradise Valley Sub-Basin:

North of Highland Flats, the Purcell Trench widens eastward and the western margin of the Cabinet Range has been eroded and partially buried by lake and other deposits that occur in Highland Flats. This broad plateau, sometimes referred to as a “bench,” is slightly lower in elevation than Highland Flats and is known as Paradise Valley. Deep Creek is the main surface stream in this portion of the trench. It flows northward near the western margin of the basin to its confluence with the Kootenai River west of Bonners Ferry.

 

In Paradise Valley, both the surficial brown sediment and the underlying blue lake clay are thicker than in Highland Flats. The brown sediment is 30-50 feet thick and the blue clay is more than 500 feet thick in the central portion of the Purcell Trench. Because the Purcell Trench is deep in this area, it is possible that multiple aquifers are present at depths that could exceed 1,000 feet in the center of Paradise Valley. However, none of the wells that have been examined are deep enough to have completely penetrated the lake clay, and therefore neither its total thickness nor the depth to an underlying aquifer or granitic bedrock are known at this time. Because these wells were not drilled through the clay, they were dry holes and they produce no water. As a result, many residents in this area utilize surface water provided by the Paradise Valley Water Association.

 

The DEQ map is generalized and does not identify any distinct or separate aquifers within the Paradise Valley Sub-basin. Paradise Valley is shown as part of the “Kootenai Valley Flow System.” However, wells along the eastern margin of Paradise Valley indicate that several small, partially separate aquifers are present. These wells penetrate little or no lake clay. Instead, this area is underlain by multiple zones of sand and gravel that have limited lateral extent and are probably lake margin stream deposits and/or beach deposits. Some wells produce water at low rates (2-5 gpm) from zones as shallow as 25 feet, while others produce water at rates of more than 10 gpm from zones deeper than 100 feet. The Cabinet Mountains Water Association produces groundwater from two very productive shallow wells in the Crossport area just south of the Kootenai River. These wells appear to be capable of producing more than 500 gpm from a gravel aquifer that was deposited by the river. Due to these variations, the depth to groundwater is highly variable in the eastern Paradise Valley.

 

 

 

 Kootenai Valley Sub-Basin:

West of the City of Bonners Ferry, the Kootenai River turns northward to parallel the Purcell Trench and forms the broad Kootenai River Valley. The western margin of this valley is the steep eastern flank of the Selkirk Range. The eastern margin is a topographically high terrace that is locally referred to as the North Bench. It is the equivalent to the flat plateau that forms Paradise Valley, although it is crossed by more numerous creeks and streams that have eroded channels into its surface, making it more undulating and not as flat-lying as the surface of Paradise Valley. The Purcell Range lies east of the North Bench, and forms the eastern limit of the Kootenai Valley groundwater sub-basin. The DEQ map identifies this sub-basin as the “Kootenai Valley Flow System” and maps it as IDAQUIFER #3.

 

The Kootenai Valley occupies the central part of the Purcell Trench, which is probably more than 1,000 feet deep. The Purcell Trench Fault is a major fault that separates the Selkirk Range from the trench, and movement on this fault elevated the Selkirk Range and depressed the Purcell Trench (Doughty and Price, 2000). There are relatively few wells within the Kootenai Valley, especially on the floodplain of the Kootenai River, and most of these are shallow wells that were drilled only deep enough to reach the first groundwater zone. In 1971, the United States Geological Survey drilled 84 observation wells in the floodplain and monitored the depth to groundwater in these wells over a period of several months (Dian and Whitehead, 1973). Most of these wells were drilled to depths of 30 feet or less, and encountered groundwater at depths ranging from five feet to about 20 feet. Logs of these wells indicate that the water-bearing zones ranged mostly from clay to medium-grained sand, although two wells produced from coarse-grained sand and one well produced from gravel. These water-bearing zones could not be traced from well to well over even short distances, indicating that aquifers are probably local in extent near the valley’s surface.

 

Water quality in these near-surface aquifers is likely influenced by intense agricultural activity, but little information is available to quantify this effect. The DEQ Source Water Assessment Reports for some water systems in the Kootenai Valley do indicate that some of these wells are at moderate risk of organic contamination from drainage ditches and agricultural operations. During the spring season, when water levels in the Kootenai River are highest, surface water percolates through the river levees into the surrounding floodplain, which raises the water table. Farmers must pump this excess water into drainage ditches to lower the water table, and this drainage may carry agricultural wastes and various organic chemicals, such as fertilizers and pesticides, downward to groundwater. These chemicals may then migrate in the subsurface toward the Kootenai River (Dion and Whitehead, 1973). A subsequent study performed by Extension professor David Wattenbarger in 1990 and 1991 indicate that while some infiltration occurred, pollutant levels did not exceed clean water standards. In his study, Wattenbarger took water samples from the outlets of ditches in five drainages; District 12, Ball Creek, District 1, Deep Creek, District 6, Houcks, District 4, county road, and District 10, mouth of Long Canyon Creek. The ditches were sampled every two weeks from mid-April through early October, and the samples analyzed by the University of Idaho Analytical Laboratory. In 1990, samples were evaluated for nitrates. In 1991, samples were analyzed for both nitrates and phosphates. Nitrate levels were highest in April and decreased with each sample thereafter. The highest sample in April met clean water standards and by September nitrates fell below detectable levels. The phosphate level was also highest in April, yet also fell within clean water standards. Phosphorous fell below detectable level by mid-August.A number of wells have been drilled along the western margin of the floodplain, where homes have been built along the West Side Road. In this area, the granitic bedrock of the Selkirk Range is present at shallow depths (50 feet or less), and most wells produce either from the granite or from coarse gravel or sand that overlies the bedrock. Rainfall and snowmelt that falls in the Selkirk Range probably percolates downward and flows into fractures in the bedrock toward the Kootenai Valley and either emerges at the surface as springs or accumulates in the bedrock or in the gravel that overlies it. Some residents use these springs as their principal water source. Wells in this area may exhibit large variations in the depth to groundwater from year to year, depending on the amount of precipitation that falls in the mountains.

 

According to data obtained by the DEQ, water samples obtained from springs and wells near the Selkirk Range front have occasionally tested positive for elevated concentrations of uranium or arsenic. These metals are naturally occurring in the bedrock, and it is likely that they have been leached out of the rock and concentrated in surface and/or groundwater. They are the only known contaminants affecting the groundwater quality in the Kootenai River sub-basin, but in most cases concentrations have not exceeded the maximum contaminant limit allowed by law.

 

 Round Prairie Groundwater Basin:

In the northern part of the county is the Round Prairie groundwater basin. The DEQ map shows Round Prairie as part of the Kootenai Valley aquifer system (IDAQUIFER #3) and watershed sub-basin 17010105, but examination of water well logs in Round Prairie indicates that it is probably separate from the Kootenai Valley sub-basin. Round Prairie Creek flows eastward through a narrow gap in the Purcell Range and joins the Moyie River in the northeastern part of the county, and it appears that groundwater in the aquifer also flows eastward rather than westward toward the Kootenai Valley Flow System.

 

Within the gap in the Purcell Range, Round Prairie Creek or a predecessor stream has built a floodplain and deposited sand and gravel that form the principal aquifer supplying residents in this part of the county. This gravel aquifer is generally about 50-feet thick or less, but is up to about 100 feet thick in some wells. Due to high runoff from the range, most of the aquifer is saturated and the water table in the Round Prairie Valley is very shallow (10 feet or less), or is even above the land surface in some areas, creating marshy wetlands that remain saturated much of the year. Private wells that tap the gravel aquifer yield good quality water at rates of five to 50 gpm. There are no public water systems that draw groundwater from this aquifer in the Round Prairie Basin.

 

In some parts of Round Prairie, especially near its north and south borders, the gravel aquifer is thin or absent. Wells in these areas tap very old metamorphosed sandstone, shale and igneous rock called the Pritchard Formation of the Belt Supergroup that underlies the gravel deposit and forms the bedrock in the Purcell Range. Obtaining usable quantities of groundwater from the Pritchard Formation requires intersecting a fracture zone with sufficient permeability, and finding a suitable drilling location is difficult. Fortunately, there are numerous faults in this portion of the Purcell Range, and it appears that these fault zones create sub-surface aquifers in local areas. The DEQ map identifies these aquifers as #4, #5, #7 and #8. These fractured-rock aquifers occur at different depths, so some wells produce groundwater at relatively shallow depths (200 feet or less), while others encounter water-bearing zones at depths that exceed 300 feet. Flow rates are also highly variable, with some wells tested at nearly 100 gpm.

 

Because there are no public water supplies in the Round Prairie basin, the DEQ has no information about differences in water quality between the shallow gravel aquifer and the deeper Pritchard Formation aquifers in this groundwater basin.

 

Moyie River Groundwater Basin:

Residents living north of the City of Moyie Springs rely primarily on groundwater along the course of the Moyie River, which flows southward out of Canada to its confluence with the Kootenai River near Moyie Springs. The Moyie River occupies a narrow canyon formed by the Moyie Fault, which has fractured the Pritchard Formation and made the rock more susceptible to erosion. This river follows this belt of fractured rock and has built a narrow floodplain that consists primarily of coarse gravel and boulders. The gravel yields groundwater at flow rates of 35 or more gpm at very shallow depths (50 feet or less). The aquifer is recharged by runoff from the mountains that border the valley, as well as by infiltration from the river itself. A few wells obtain their water from the Pritchard Formation at depths of more than 100 feet, such as the public water systems of Eastport, Good Grief, and Feist Creek Resort. The DEQ does not differentiate the Moyie River underground water basin from the Kootenai Valley Flow System.

Appendix V ð

Sours: http://www2.boundarycountyid.org/planning/compplan/final_draft/appendix_iv.htm
Florida's aquifer adventure - Florida Geological Survey Video 2

Index of Ground-Water-Level Data by State

State

USGS real-time wells

USGS CRN wells

Agency / dataset

Agency / dataset desc.

Approx. number of wells

Real time (R) and (or) Periodic (P)

Method(s) used to serve data

Alabama

7

6

Alabama Department of Environmental Management, Hydrogeology Unit
The Hydrogeology Unit of the Groundwater Branch provides hydrogeologic expertise and project management for the State Groundwater Protection Program.

None

n/a

n/a

Geological Survey of Alabama, Water Resources Program

The Alabama Geological Survey monitors and keeps records of water well usage, ground-water levels, and water quality.

700

P

Publications; written requestAlabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs
A significant aspect of hydrologic analysis is the availability of a wide range of physical, hydrologic, and meteorological data used to support various types of analyses. Efforts are underway to organize the current data and provide access to interested citizens and public and private groups.

None

n/a

n/a

Alaska

0

2

Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mining, Land & Water, Well-log database on-line (WELTS)
The Hydrologic Survey Unit collects, analyzes, interprets, and reports on Alaska's waters, including wetlands, glaciers, and coastal waters; provides scientific advice and hydrologic data on the quantity and quality of Alaska's surface and subsurface waters.

?

P

Text-based search engine provides static water levels in remarks; publications

Arizona

20

3

Arizona Department of Water Resources, Imaged Records Database

The ADWR Imaged Records Database includes scanned well registry documents and records available for viewing in electronic format. Requires a free plug-in. 

?

P

Text-based search engine provides scanned images of hydrographs and well completion reports. Requires login and download of ActiveX plugin.

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Database
System provides information on groundwater quality monitoring activities, including a comprehensive repository on well location data, construction details, measurements, observations, and water quality sampling results. STORET

48,663

P

STORETArizona Department of Water Resources, eBookstore, Groundwater Wells for Arizona
The Groundwater Site Inventory (GWSI) database is the main ADWR repository for statewide groundwater data regarding wells and springs. The GWSI consists of field verified data collected by personnel from the ADWR Hydrology Division and/or the U.S. Geological Survey.

120,990

P

On-line bookstore; GIS coverages and shapefiles on CD with MS Access database available for purchase.

Arkansas

7

2

Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation District
The Commission works closely with other State and federal agencies to monitor a water well network for water level and water-quality information.

1,200

P

Publications

California

59

4

California Department of Water Resources, Water Data Library
On-line access to groundwater level data, reports, and hydrographs collected by DWR and cooperating agencies.

42,689

P

Text- and map-based search engine provides hydrographs and data tables of water-level data.

Los Angeles County Department of Public Works Ground Water Wells Web Site
Public Works is responsible for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and repair of sewers, water supply, flood control, and water conservation facilities.

15

P

Map-based search engine provides tables of water-level data.

Colorado

2

1

Colorado Division of Water Resources, Hydrobase database
The Colorado Division of Water Resources (Office of the State Engineer) is an agency within the Department of Natural Resources providing administration of Colorado's water resources to meet the demands of today, and to provide for the needs of tomorrow. The Hydrobase database will soon include water-level data (as of 2005).

?

P

Text-based search engine provides aquifer test data (under development). Data also available by purchase on CD.

Connecticut

4

5

Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Water Management
Administers programs to protect and restore the state’s surface and ground waters and related resources to protect public water supplies, human health, and safety as well as protecting fish and aquatic life, preserving and enhancing water-based recreation and restoring the state’s rivers; promotes pollution prevention and compliance assurance.

None

n/a

n/a

Delaware

1

3

Delaware Geological Survey, Water-Level Monitoring Network
The program of the Delaware Geological Survey, includes research, exploration, and service in accordance with the statute founding the unit in 1951. The charges specified provide the framework for the activities of the DGS: systematic investigation of the geology and physiographic features of Delaware, including consideration of such scientific questions in the field of geology that are deemed of value to the people of the State; exploration and research pertaining to the water, mineral, and other earth resources that are or may become of economic importance to the State; preparation of reports and maps presenting its findings; and provision of factual geologic information and advice to the officials and citizens of the State of Delaware to assure optimum and equitable utilization of geologic resources.

15

P

Tables with no data values reporting above normal (AN), normal (N), and below normal (N) categorical data. pdf files with hydrographs from selected wells.

District of Columbia

0

0

None 

None

n/a

n/a

Florida

205

4

Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Water Resource Management

The Department's Water Resource Management Programs are responsible for protecting the quality of Florida’s drinking water as well as its rivers, lakes and wetlands, and for reclaiming lands after they’ve been mined for phosphate and other minerals. We establish the technical basis for setting the state’s surface water and ground water quality standards, and also implement a variety of programs to monitor the quality of those water resources. STORET

None

n/a

n/a

Georgia

20

17

Georgia Department of Natural Resources
The Georgia Environmental Protection Division helps provide Georgia's citizens with clean air, clean water, healthy lives and productive land by assuring compliance with environmental laws and by assisting others to do their part for a better environment.

?

P

Publications

Hawaii

1

(7 wells on USGS web site)

5

Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management

The Commission on Water Resource Management's Survey Branch is responsible for collecting basic hydrologic data and conducting water availability and sustainable yield analyses statewide.

5

P

Map-(primitive image) based search engine provides static pdf files of hydrographs.City and County of Honolulu, Honolulu Board of Water Supply
Largely due to heightened security concerns, the Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management (CWRM) and the county water supply departments do not post ground-water data on the Internet, as ground-water is Hawaii's primary source of drinking water.

?

?

Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management indicates that they serve water-level data; however, data was not found.

Idaho

3

3

Idaho Department of Water Resources, Online Groundwater Level Database
The IDWR Hydrology Section maintains a database of information on ground-water levels in Idaho. The IDWR database, known as the Well_Log, uses data gathered by a number of sources. Major sources of data are measurements taken by the U.S.Geological Survey, IDWR contractors, IDWR staff, and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

?

P

Map-based search engine provides hydrographs and tables of water-level data.

Illinois

2

1

Illinois State Water Survey, Private Well Database
The Illinois State Water Survey, a division of the Office of Scientific Research and Analysis of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and an affiliated agency of the University of Illinois at Champaign/Urbana, is the primary agency in Illinois concerned with water and atmospheric resources.

?

P

Username/password access to database serving static water levels in domestic wells.

Indiana

13

8

Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water, Water Well Record Database
The Water Rights and Use Section currently maintains, in original paper and digital form, the records of nearly 355,000 water wells drilled in Indiana. Of this number approximately 130,000 records have been field verified.

355,000

P

Text-based search engine provides well log with static water level.

Iowa

2

2

Iowa Geological Survey, GEOSAM
GEOSAM contains information about water wells, their construction design and geologic framework, along with other geological sites from around Iowa.

?

P

Map-based search engine provides well logs with static water level Iowa's Municipal Water-Supply Inventory (MWSI) database
water-level information for municipal supply wells

?

P

Username/password access to database serving municipal supply-well data.

Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Private Well Tracking System

The Water Supply Section of the Environmental Protection Division of the Department of Natural Resources oversees the regulation of the construction and renovation of private wells and the plugging of abandoned wells by Certified Water Well Contractors in the State of Iowa.

?

P

Username/password access to database of well permits and drillers logs with static water levels.Iowa STORET database
The ambient water quality program is a diverse program responsible for the collection, analysis and dissemination of information on Iowa’s rivers, lakes, groundwater and wetlands. Physical, chemical, biological and habitat data are administered as part of this program.

?

P

Text-based search engine through Oracle database mirrored after USEPA STORET database

Kansas

24

2

Kansas Geological Survey, WIZARD Water Level Database
WIZARD is an acronym for Water Information Storage and Retrieval Database and represents a repository of information on fresh-water wells drilled into aquifers in Kansas. It contains data on the location and consturction of Kansas wells drilled for water and water-related purposes. WIZARD consolidates information fomerly maintained by several local, state, and federal agencies. For wells that are part of the statewide or local water-level observation networks, WIZARD contains an historic record of water levels measured at various times during the year. Most of these data consist of annual measurements of depth-to-water taken in the winter, but some wells are measured on a quartley or monthly basis. Except for location information, data are not complete for all wells. WIZARD is owned and maintained by the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) for use by the citizens and agencies of the State of Kansas. WIZARD resides physically at the KGS in Lawrence, Kansas as an ORACLE relational database consisting of 19 related tables.

165

P

Text-based search engine through Oracle database providing water-level data and hydrographs; publications. Kansas Geological Survey, Water Well Completion Database
The Water Well Completion Form Database (WWC5) contains information from records submitted by water well drillers to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Drilling companies are mandated by state legislation under the Kansas Groundwater Exploration and Protection Act (KSA 82a-1201 et seq.) to provide information pertaining to the location, type, use, casing, nearest source of contamination, and so on of the well drilled using the WWC5 form. No water quality data is provided in this database. A good portion of the archived WWC5 records are in the form of electronicly scanned images of the forms themselves. As such, the only standard database items entered into an Oracle RDBMS relate to the location information of the WWC5 wells, use of the well, when the well was completed, status of the wells, well depth, static water elevation, and the name of the drilling company servicing the site.

?

P

Text-based search engine through Oracle database providing scanned records of all water wells drilled or plugged since 1974.

Kentucky

1

1

Kentucky Division of Water, Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
The primary purpose of the Statewide Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program is to provide base line groundwater data including aquifer characterization information, ambient groundwater quality and identification of nonpoint source impacts.

60,000

P

Water levels transmitted annually to KY Geological Survey Groundwater Data Repository (below).Kentucky Geological Survey, Kentucky Groundwater Data Repository
The Kentucky Groundwater Data Repository was initiated in 1990 by the Kentucky Geological Survey under mandate from the Kentucky legislature (KRS 151:035). The repository was established to archive and disseminate groundwater data collected by State agencies, other organizations, and independent researchers.

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Map- and text-based search engine providing static water levels from drillers logs.

Louisiana

8

2

Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Water Resources Section
The purpose of DOTD's Ground Water Resource Program is to provide for the efficient administration, orderly development, protection, wise use, and management of the State's ground water resources and to ensure safe and abundant supplies of water for domestic, industrial, agricultural, and other purposes. Since 61% of the State's total population relies on ground water for their domestic needs, the protection of this valuable resource is not only essential for public health, but is vital to the future economy of our State.

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Defers to USGS.

Maine

20

21

Maine Department of Conservation, Maine Geological Survey
In 1836 the Maine Legislature authorized the first geological survey of the State, thus beginning a process of geological inquiry which continues today. A modern geological survey with full-time staff and an active field program evolved by the early 1940s to meet the resource demands of a growing population and the strategic mineral needs of a nation at war. Program emphasis through this early period was on economic resources including dimension stone, ore minerals, and clay. In the 1960s and 1970s a major exploration boom was fueled in part by the survey's detailed reports on ore deposits. While economic aspects remain a part of survey programs, the burgeoning population of southern and coastal Maine has required us to refocus our resources toward ground water and coastal marine issues. By using a modern geographic information system we are improving the analysis of map information and our ability to make high quality maps available to the public.

None

n/a

Defers to USGS. Maine Department of Environmental Protection
The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is responsible for protecting and restoring Maine's natural resources and enforcing the state's environmental laws. The agency can trace its roots back to the Sanitary Water Board that was created in 1941. The purpose of that Board was to study, investigate, recommend means of eliminating and preventing pollution in waters used for recreational purposes. The Board was renamed the Water Improvement Commission in 1951. In 1969, the Commission's title was abbreviated to the Environmental Improvement Commission.

None

n/a

 

Maryland

10

10

Maryland Geological Survey
Exploring for ground water by means of hydrogeologic studies, geophysical surveys, and test drilling.

None

n/a

Defers to USGS.

Massachusetts

11

89

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection

None

n/a

Defers to USGS.

Michigan

3

4

State of Michigan, Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Groundwater Mapping Project
The Michigan Groundwater Mapping Project was mandated by Public Act 148 of 2003, which requires that a groundwater inventory and map be generated for the state. Funding was provided by the State of Michigan through cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the MSU Institute of Water Research.

295

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Map-based (ARCIMS) search engine providing water-level data given as pdf files upon "identify" in map viewer.

Minnesota

27

4

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and University of Minnesota Observation Well Database

Since 1944, DNR Waters has managed a statewide network of water level observation wells (obwells). Data from these wells are used to assess ground water resources, determine long term trends, interpret impacts of pumping and climate, plan for water conservation, evaluate water conflicts, and otherwise manage the water resource. Soil and Water Conservation Districts under contract with DNR Waters measure the wells monthly and report the readings to DNR Waters. Readings are also obtained from volunteers at several locations.
    

700

    

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Map- and text-based search engine provides hydrographs and water-level data. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Ambient Ground Water Monitoring and Assessment Database
In 1991, a study (baseline study) was begun within the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's (MPCA) Ground Water Monitoring and Assessment Program (GWMAP) to establish baseline ground water quality in Minnesota's principal aquifers. A randomized grid design was established across the state, with a grid node spacing of 11 miles. A well from each principal aquifer that is used as a source of drinking water was selected within a nine-mile target area centered on each grid node.

954

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Publications

Mississippi

4

2

Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality
The mission of the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality is to safeguard the health, safety, and welfare of present and future generations of Mississippians by conserving and improving our environment and fostering wise economic growth through focused research and responsible regulation.

None

n/a

Defers to USGS.

Missouri

78

3

Missouri Department of Natural Resources
Our easily accessible data is currently served on the USGS real-time web site. Requests for older data we handle on a case-by-case basis and supply paper graphs, GIF files of graphs, or ASCII files. We have plans to get more of the information on DNR's web site but no timetable for doing so.

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Real-time link defers to USGS

Montana

1

5

Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Ground Water Information Center
The Ground-Water Information Center (GWIC) at the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) is the central repository for information on the ground-water resources of Montana. The data include well-completion reports from drillers, measurements of well performance and water quality based on site visits, water-level measurements at various wells for periods of up to 60 years, and water-quality reports for thousands of samples. The databases at GWIC are continually updated with new data from driller's logs, MBMG research projects, and research projects from other agencies.

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Hydrographs, maps, and text file data of each well available by county. Additional data are available through username sign-in to database.

Nebraska

25

2

Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, Registered Groundwater Wells Data Retrieval
The Nebraska Department of Natural Resources is dedicated to the sustainable use and proper management of the State's natural resources.

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Text-based search engine provides static water levels from driller's logs.Nebraska Department of Natural Resources - Water Quality Data
The Nebraska Department of Natural Resources is dedicated to the sustainable use and proper management of the State's natural resources.

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Text- and map-based search engine linking to STORET.

Nevada

9

5

Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies (Yucca Mountain)
Through the Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies at the University of Nevada – Las Vegas

24

P

No link or access to data found.

State of Nevada, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources , Division of Water Resources, Well Logs and Well Driller Information

The Division will continue to manage the state's water resources through monitoring existing uses, reallocating water to new uses and ensuring that Nevada's growth can be based on a sustained yield.

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Text-based search engine through ACCESS provides static water levels in logs drilled since 1984. Entire database can be downloaded.Southern Nevada Water Authority, Las Vegas Valley Groundwater Management Program Hydrologic Telemetry System (HTS)
As part of the Las Vegas Valley Groundwater Management Program, the Southern Nevada Water Authority has initiated a real-time water level monitoring program. (However access to data not found on web site)

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Web site indicates that real-time monitoring is done along with periodic measurements of over 300 wells.

New Hampshire

2

25

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, Water Supply Engineering Bureau
The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) was created in early 1987 as a result of legislative efforts to reorganize several previously separate agencies dealing with environmental matters into a single, coordinated agency. Within NHDES, there are three divisions which deal with air resources, waste management, and water resources. This last unit, the Water Division (WD), includes several bureaus, one of which is the WSEB.

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Text-based search engine provides static water levels.

New Jersey

20

20

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New Jersey Geological Survey, Ambient Ground Water Quality Network
The Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Network was established in 1983. It is a cooperative program under the direction of NJDEP and USGS.Network data is available from the following sources: (1) the USGS computerized data system, NWISWeb (National Water Information System), (2) EPA's computerized data system, STORET and (3) USGS's annual reports Water Resources Data- New Jersey.

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Defers to USGS;22 to 30 wells are selected annually from a large network. Available as zip file of an Arc/INFO shapefile with all data.

New Mexico

5

2

New Mexico Environment Department, Ground Water Quality Bureau
The role of the Ground Water Quality Bureau is to protect the environmental quality of New Mexico’s ground water resources as mandated by the Water Quality Act and the Water Quality Control Commission (WQCC) regulations (20.6.2 NMAC), and to identify, investigate and clean-up contaminated sites which pose significant risks to human health and the environment.

None

n/a

 

New Mexico Office of the State Engineer, WATERS

Groundwater Monitoring. The objective of this ongoing project is to provide a long-term groundwater level database for quantification of groundwater resources by measuring water levels in wells and documenting the observed changes. During fiscal year 1999-2000, a total of 700 water levels were collected. Intensive measurements were collected from the following areas: Gila River, San Simon & Virden, Salt Basin, Middle Rio Grande Basin, Estancia Basin, Ft. Sumner and Causey-Lingo area.

700

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New York

59

55

New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Water
The Division of Water protects water quality in lakes, rivers, aquifers and coastal areas by regulating wastewater discharges, monitoring water quality and controlling surface runoff. Water programs ensure adequate water quantity for public water supply, fish and wildlife habitat, and other uses; and reduce impacts from flooding, dam failure, and beach erosion. The Division works with partners and communities to promote water stewardship and education.

17

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Defers to USGS.

North Carolina

36

18

North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water
The Ground Water Management Section of the Division of Water Resources provides technical and management support for the development and use of ground water resources in the State of North Carolina.

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Map- and text-based search engine provides water level data. Defers to USGS for real-time data.

North Dakota

3

5

North Dakota State Water Commission Site Inventory Retrieval System
It is the Vision of water management for the 21st century that North Dakota will enjoy an adequate supply of quality water: Water resource management will ensure health, safety, and prosperity; and balance the water needs for present and future generations.

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Text-based search engine provides water-level data (small button at bottom of page difficult to locate).North Dakota Department of Health, Division of Water Quality, Ambient Ground Water Monitoring Network

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Data available by request.

Ohio

11

8

Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Observation Well Network

The Division of Water, Water Resources Section (WRS) is responsible for collecting, researching, interpreting and disseminating hydrologic and ground water resource information for the State of Ohio. An important component of this program is to characterize Ohio’s ground water resources through monitoring and evaluating long-term trends in ground water level fluctuations throughout the state’s various aquifer systems.

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Map- and text-based search engine provides water levels and hydrographs.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Well Log Inventory

The Division of Water (DOW) currently maintains over 725,000 water well records that have been filed with the state since 1945. Each well log is a legal document filed by water well drilling contractors and maintained by the DOW under Ohio Revised Code Section 1521.05.

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Scanned images of well logs with static water levels.

Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Ambient Water-Quality Network

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) is the designated state ground water quality management agency for preventing and addressing ground water quality problems.

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P

STORET

Oklahoma

5

2

Oklahoma Water Resources Board Water Well Level Mass Measurement Program
Groundwater level information collected in the state's water well measurement program, conducted jointly by the OWRB and USGS since 1950, is used to predict water use trends and future availability of Oklahoma's groundwater supplies. Each year, primarily during the winter months, Board staff measure depth-to-water in approximately 750 wells throughout Oklahoma, including 250 in the Panhandle region. While a primary purpose of data collection is to determine the maximum annual yields of state groundwater basins, the program also helps track water level changes and identify areas experiencing groundwater depletion.

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Defers to USGS.

Oregon

7

9

Oregon Water Resources Department, Water Level Data and Hydrographs
The Department's mission is to serve the public by practicing and promoting wise long-term water management through two key goals: to directly address Oregon's water supply needs, and to restore and protect streamflows and watersheds in order to ensure the long-term sustainability of Oregon's ecosystems, economy, and quality of life.

9964

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Map- and text-based search engine provides water-level data and hydrographs.

Pennsylvania

68

65

Pennsylvania Topographic and Geologic Survey Ground Water Information System (PaGWIS)
The Pennsylvania Ground Water Information System (PaGWIS) consists of two Microsoft Access databases, ESRI's ArcExplorer software, and a wealth of digital geographic data for use in ArcExplorer. The heart of the system is a large Access relational database containing data for wells, springs, and ground water quality throughout Pennsylvania.

165,827

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Text-based search engine provides water-level data. Also available through CD purchase with Arc Explorer and Access database of wells.Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
In 1931, as a result of interest in ground-water declines caused by the drought of 1930, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a statewide network of wells to monitor water-level fluctuations. Today, this network consists of 68 wells operated by USGS in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Watershed Conservation. The primary purpose of the observation-well network is to monitor ground-water conditions during droughts.

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Defers to USGS.

Rhode Island

11

38

State of Rhode Island, Department of Environmental Management Office of Water Resources
DEM is the repository of significant amounts of environmental data. This data provides information on the health of the water we use to drink, swim in and provides a home for the many aquatic species that call Rhode Island home. DEM also collects air quality data that monitors the air we breathe. DEM is also responsible for using scientific means to collect the data that is used in environmental decision-making.

None

n/a

Defers to USGS.

South Carolina

12

4

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Bureau of Water, Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring
South Carolina depends upon its ground-water resources to supply an estimated 40% of its water supply, encompassing public water systems as well as private water wells. To monitor the ambient quality of this valuable resource, an Ambient Groundwater Quality Network of 115 existing public and private water supply wells has been established which provides ground-water quality data representing all of the State's major aquifers.

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Publications with water-quality data but no water levels. Ground Water Levels in South Carolina -- A compilation of Historic Water-Level Data
More than 54 years of data from various sources have been compiled, reviewed, and prepared as hydrographs for this publication. These hydrographs show water-level trends in 282 South Carolina wells, 266 in the Coastal Plain physiographic province and 16 in the Piedmont. For approximately one-third of the wells, data are available for a period of 20 years or more; 14 well records contain data for 40 years or more, and 7 of these wells are in Beaufort County. JAS-1, a well located in southeastern Jasper County, has the longest period of record – more than 50 years.

282

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Publications with well details and hydrographs.

South Dakota

12

6

South Dakota Department of Environment & Natural Resources Water Quality Database

The ground water section oversees the regulation of ground water supplies primarily in terms of the quantity of ground water. Two of the major focuses within this section are the observation well network and well construction standards. The observation well network consists of 1,600 wells which are used to continuously collect water level and water quality data.

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Text-based water-quality database with search engine providing static water levels. Additional water-level data available by request.

South Dakota Department of Environment & Natural Resources, Test holes and Wells Database
Digital image files

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Static map showing well locations, but no data.

Tennessee

20

2

Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation
Information about the programs dedicated to protecting, preserving and improving Tennessee's Water Quality.

None

n/a

None

Texas

23

5

Texas Water Development Board, Groundwater Database

Of the approximate 1,000,000 water wells drilled in Texas in this century, approximately 128,000 are registered in the TWDB ground-water database. This web service provides external users with reported water well information for those wells registered with the TWDB.

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Map- and text-based search engine provides water-level data and hydrographs. Provides text files of water-level data for entire state and by county.

Texas Water Development Board, Submitted Driller's Report Database
Database created from the online Texas Well Report Submission and Retrieval System (A cooperative TDLR,TWDB system) that registered water-well drillers use to submit their required reports. This system was started 2/5/01 and is optional for the drillers to use.

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Map- and text-based search engine provides water-level data and hydrographs. Provides text files of water-level data for entire state and by county.

Utah

3

4

Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water

None

n/a

None.Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources
The Utah Geological Survey, a division of the Utah Department of Natural Resources, is an applied scientific agency that creates, interprets, and provides information about Utah's geologic environment, resources, and hazards to promote safe, beneficial, and wise use of land.

None

n/a

None.Utah Division of Water Rights, Well Logs

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n/a

Grid overlay on map of Utah for selection of wells; however, several attempts yielded no results.

Vermont

2

12

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, Private Well Locations
The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s mission is to preserve, enhance, restore and conserve Vermont’s natural resources and protect human health for the benefit of this and future generations. The DEC, along with the departments of Fish and Wildlife and of Forest, Parks and Recreation, is part of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources.

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Map- and text-based search engine provides water-level data and hydrographs. Well selection tool requires several "Zoom-ins" to see and select wells.

Virginia

57

22

Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
DEQ administers the federal Clean Water Act and enforces state laws to improve the quality of Virginia's streams, rivers, bays and ground water for aquatic life, human health and other water uses. Permits are issued to businesses, industries, local governments and individuals that take into account physical, chemical and biological standards for water quality.

354

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Defers to USGS.

Washington

1

7

Washington State Department of Ecology Groundwater Level Monitoring Programs
DEQ administers the federal Clean Water Act and enforces state laws to improve the quality of Virginia's streams, rivers, bays and ground water for aquatic life, human health and other water uses. Permits are issued to businesses, industries, local governments and individuals that take into account physical, chemical and biological standards for water quality. Figure 2 identifies programs that routinely collect information about groundwater water levels.

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Site lists long-term ground-water level monitoring programs with contacts and (or) URLs to get more information. Washington State Department of Ecology Environmental Information Management System
The Environmental Information Management System (EIM), a searchable database developed and maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology contains environmental data from the Department of Ecology and affiliates such as local government and grantees.

38078

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Text-based search engine provides static water levels (search on parameter name "water level in well"). Washington State Department of Ecology, Well Log Viewer
Ecology is Washington's principal environmental management agency. We are working with you for a better Washington. Our mission is to protect, preserve and enhance Washington's environment, and promote the wise management of our air, land and water. Our goals are to prevent pollution, clean up pollution, and support sustainable communities and natural resources.

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Map- and text-based search engine provides scanned images of well logs with static water levels.

West Virginia

6

5

West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey
Investigating and Reporting on West Virginia's Geology and Disseminating Information to Solve Problems, Enhance Economic Growth, and Promote Responsible Resource Development

None

n/a

None.

3

18

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Groundwater Retrieval Network (GRN)
This system reports data from the Department's Public Water Supply (public drinking water supply wells), Private Water Supply (private drinking water supply wells, non-point source priority watershed projects, and special groundwater studies), the Bureau of Waste's Groundwater and Environmental Monitoring System (GEMS) (landfill wells) and the Bureau of Watershed Management's System for Wastewater Applications and Monitoring Permits (SWAMP) (wastewater treatment facilities and land spreading sites). Data covers the period from the early 1970s to present for the Public Water Supply data; 1988 to present for the Private Water Supply data; from the mid 1970s to present for the GEMS database; and from the mid 1970s to present for the SWAMP system. The SWAMP data must undergo review from the facilities and only previously reviewed data is available. Not all programs which currently generate groundwater related data are linked into the GRN system. Data from the Bureau of Remediation and Redevelopment (LUST, spills, or remediation sites) is not currently retrievable through the GRN system.

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Text-based search engine provides static water levels. Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, Well Constructor's Reports
The Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS), a part of the University of Wisconsin–Extension, is an interdisciplinary organization that conducts natural resources surveys and research to produce information used for decision making, problem solving, planning, management, development, and education. Survey is defined to include resource inventory and basic and applied research and analysis. The WGNHS has no specific regulatory or enforcement responsibilities.

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Trial download of database available on Web. Entire database available on CD by purchase. Database includes scanned images of well logs, well-construction details, and static water levels. Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, Ground Water Observation Network
The Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS), a part of the University of Wisconsin–Extension, is an interdisciplinary organization that conducts natural resources surveys and research to produce information used for decision making, problem solving, planning, management, development, and education. Survey is defined to include resource inventory and basic and applied research and analysis. The WGNHS has no specific regulatory or enforcement responsibilities.

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Defers to USGS.

Wyoming

3

4

Wyoming State Engineers Office Water Rights Database
The Wyoming Constitution defines that all natural waters within the boundaries of the state are declared to be the property of the state. The Wyoming State Engineer's Office is charged with the regulation and administration of the water resources in Wyoming.

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Text-based search engine provides static water levels. Wyoming Water Development Commission, Wyoming State Water Plan, Statewide Water Resources Data System (WRDS)
The 1996 Legislature directed the Wyoming Water Development Commission (WWDC) and the State Engineer's Office (SEO) to prepare recommendations for updating the 1973 Wyoming Framework Water Plan. The two agencies submitted a joint recommendation to the Governor, the Select Water Committee, and the Water Development Commission on October 1, 1996.

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Text-based search engine provides static water levels and hydrographs from many cooperating agencies, mostly USGS.         

Caribbean (Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands)

21None

None

n/a

n/a

 
Sours: https://acwi.gov/sogw/nmi-wkg/State_Ground-Water_Level_Data.htm

Depth map idaho water table

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AHGW: Creating Water Level Maps

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