Camping merit badge workbook

Camping merit badge workbook DEFAULT

Camping Merit Badge

All Merit Badges



Comments:
 

Mar 13, 2014 - karen melby teerlink

9a is ambiguous.   In the notes   it says "All" camps count.  In the body of the text it says you can apply on week long scout camp.   I feel that statement contradicts the other. So my specific question is: Can you use a organized week long scout camp in one year and then in the following year, also? thanks Karen


Mar 13, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Karen - The answer to your question is "No". The note is there to emphasize that camping done before the scout got his blue card should still be counted.


Apr 01, 2014 - Gerardo Guerrero

Every time we go camping to work on the cooking, hiking, etc. merit badges, do these camp trips count for the camping merit badge ???


Apr 01, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Gerardo - Yes, as long as they match the 9a requirement.


Apr 03, 2014 - Tracey

So if you have been to three week long scout camps you can only count 6 days?  You are still camping each of those times.  Shouldn't they count for a few days?


Apr 03, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Tracey - That is correct.  Only one of the long-term camps can count for up to 6 nights.  The rest are not counted.


Apr 13, 2014 - mike

A Scout had been inactive for the last few years and has a week or so before turning 18 looking to get his camping merit badge and thus his Eagle badge.  He lacks quite a number of the camping nights.  One of the committee members is looking to push through "camping nights" at home in his living room to satisfy his retirements, bypassing the traditional camping merit badge counselor.  We are most upset that this is an inactive scout who is being allowed to set aside the requirements for this badge.   Any ideas on what should be done? Call the district?  Two of us are sadly looking to step down as committee members due to this type of behavior.  Other scouts then suffer.  What to do?  


Apr 13, 2014 - Yukon Jack

@ Mike. WOW, that is a flagrant violation of the requirements, rules, and spirit of scouting. Bottom line, it sounds like this scout won't get Eagle...and shouldn't. Your best recourse is to solve the issue in house. If only one committee member is trying this, then simply overrule him. Has this scout done his Eagle project? Something like this has to pass muster at the district/council level and if you have to, simply inform the District Advancement Committee of how the Camping MB was "earned" and they will stop the Eagle Application right there. If you can't make the one adult see how they're blatantly cheating, then go above their head to district/council where there WILL be scouters who will protect the integrity of the Eagle Rank.


Apr 13, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@mike - That situation sounds terrible to me.  A merit badge MUST be signed off by an authorized merit badge counselor, approved by the council. If I were you, I would quickly let the Scoutmaster know about the rumor I had heard to find out what the actual situation is from his (or her) viewpoint.  If he confirms what was described, then I would ask him how he planned to prevent it from happening.  If he is supporting it, I would ask him for the name of the merit badge counselor and let him know I am contacting the district advancement chair. After informing the scoutmaster and district advancement chair of the situation, that would be the end of my involvement.  It's the counselor's responsibility to uphold the requirements.  It's the advancement chair's responsibility to ensure counselors are fulfilling their role. Maybe some other readers would have other suggestions?


May 04, 2014 - Betty Woodward

Do all the nights have to be with organized scout activities? Can camping outdoors as a family count?


May 05, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Betty - Yes, requirement 9a states "... at designated Scouting activities or events." No, camping with the family doesn't count.


Jun 01, 2014 - Sirena

My son is going to Camp chawanakee for the first this is his first time camping with the troop. Does this count as only one outing/overnight?


Jun 01, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Sirena - If it is a long term camp, rather than a weekend camp, he can use it for up to 6 nights of camping for requirement 9a.  That is true if he sleeps in a tent, not in a cabin.  It would count as the one long-term camp he can apply towards this merit badge.  The rest of his camping needs to be short-term campouts, such as weekend campouts with his troop.


Jun 24, 2014 - Roxanne Coffey

9A seems open to interpretation to me.  My son has attended camporee and summer camps for an actual total of 34 nights.  He has camped with the troop for an additional total of 16 nights (1 or 2 nights each).  So 50 nights so far... but if extended camps only count for 6 nights and the other times to camp count as zero and our merit badge councilor only counts one night per trip for the others he has only 16 nights... which is crazy... Given that it says that all campouts may count, my interpretation is that one of the longer camps counts for 6 nights and then he has to go for 14 more campouts if each only count for 1 night.  My frustration is that other boys in the troop with a different councilor are counting all the nights for each short trip...and in some cases counting summer camp as 1 night.  He is 17 and we are running out of time -- is there anyone we can appeal this to?  They don't want him to do an Eagle project till all badges are done.


Jun 24, 2014 - Roxanne Coffey

He is now a senior and if they only go on one trip per month starting in Sept. (since summer camp doesn't count at all after the first one) and assuming he can go on all of them and none are cancelled, and they do one in December (which they normally don't) that puts him done in February which gives him 1 month for his Eagle project since his birthday is in April... and that seems crazy.


Jun 24, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Roxanne - 1.  There is no requirement that all merit badges be complete before starting an Eagle project.   2. Each night of weekend campouts should be counted.  If a scout sleeps out Friday and Saturday night, that's 2 nights. 3. If your son camped 16 nights on weekend campouts, in a manner that meets requirement #9, and 6 nights at a single long-term camp, then he's done 22 nights - that is enough. Your son can list dates and all the nights he's camped and discuss that with his counselor to show that he's met the requirement.  Or, he can find a different counselor for the merit badge.


Jul 03, 2014 - Roxanne Coffey

If he switches counselors does that mean he has to redo all of the requirements? Thanks!


Jul 03, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Roxanne - That does not happen very often.  Usually, a counselor will accept previously completed requirements.  Your son will probably just need to show that he completed them.


Jul 04, 2014 - Nola

@ Roxanne, if your son has his blue card and the parts that have been completed are signed by one counselor, a new counselor can not make him re-do those requirements. Some boys take several years and thus different counselors at times (especially ones started at camp) to complete a Merit Badge. If the new counselor doesn't accept the signed work find another one and report to District Advancement Chair.


Jul 09, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Nola - Please see section 7.0.3.3 of Merit Badge Program page at scouting.org where it states this about partial completions: "A subsequent counselor may choose not to accept partial work, but this should be rare." As a MB Counselor, when I sign the cards, I'm stating that I believe all the requirements have been completed.


Jul 15, 2014 - Benjamin

I think I know the answer here but just in case here it is-Do nights camping as a den chief with the scouts assigned cub den count towards this MB requirement? I do not think he will need the nights but it could get him done a lot faster as our CS pack camps as much as our troop during the summer months.


Aug 21, 2014 - Anthony

Do only nights slept in tents and on the grond count or do events in lean tos count as well.  Since tents prepared at scout camps do, it seems logical that leN to stays should as well.


Aug 21, 2014 - Anthony

Do only nights slept in tents and on the grond count or do events in lean tos count as well.  Since tents prepared at scout camps do, it seems logical that leN to stays should as well.


Sep 03, 2014 - Roxanne Coffey

We are still stuck on this requirement.  My son has spent over 60 nights camping... on 18 different occasions all as boy scout none of these while cub.  The counselor agrees that he has completed all other requirements but is now interpreting this as the number of camping trips not nights... This does not include O. of A. trips.  Do those count?   This is the only person in our troop that does Camping merit badge.... I'm wondering if this is some kind of test to see if my son will stand up to this person or if he really doesn't understand the requirement.  


Sep 03, 2014 - Roxanne Coffey

The other counselor for Camping stopped being counselor since he didn't interpret the wording the same way... I really feel this needs to be clarified in the scouting merit badge handbook with an example of what counts and what doesn't!


Sep 03, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Roxanne - Wow, I feel your frustration!  A Boy Scout camping with the Order of the Arrow, sleeping outside under the stars or in a tent the scout pitched, DOES count. I've never heard of counting only 'trips' rather than 'nights' - your son can just show the counselor the requirement where it says 'NIGHTS'.   Your son can use a counselor outside of your troop.  He can contact the district advancement chair and ask for other Camping counselors. I'm sending you an email also, in case you have more to share privately.


Jan 08, 2015 - Jenn

I have a question about 9c: Must the conservation project be done on a campout? I have always interpreted this as yes, but the wording is ambiguous and scouts and parents are confused. Thanks!


Jan 08, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Jenn - 9a and 9b specifically mention camping so I would say that the 9c conservation project can be done outside of a camping trip.  I had 6 scouts help build part of the North Country Nat'l Scenic Trail through northern MN as their project, while they camped 3 nights.  That was a fun outing!


Jan 11, 2015 - Melanie Colston

I have a question about 9a.  My son went to summer camp for 5 nights two years in a row.  I know only one long term camping trip (up to 6 nights) counts.  So his first trip counts for 5 nights.  Can we count one night out of the 5 for the subsequent year?  


Jan 13, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Melanie - No, you may not count nights from two summer camps.


Jan 15, 2015 - Cliff

I need an explanation as to why each night at a weekend camp counts but you get absolutely no credit for summer camps beyond the one time.  Is this to ensure participation? Further if a scout has completed requirements of the merit badge before the issuance of the blue card, do the requirments have to be repeated? Who is responsible for starting the card, the scout or the leader?


Jan 15, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Cliff - Lots of questions... The answer to "WHY" is because that is how the merit badge requirements are written by the BSA.  That is true for every merit badge.  The group of people that defined these requirements felt that one summer camp was enough and the other camping nights should come from other camping experiences. All scout campouts done while registered as a scout may be counted, even those done before starting this merit badge, if the scout can convince his merit badge counselor that he participated in appropriate camping outings.   The scout is responsible for his own advancement, including starting merit badges.


Jan 16, 2015 - Daron

Here's an article in Scouting magazine that precisely answers the question about camping nights: blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2012/06/07/ask-the-expert-interpreting-camping-merit-badge-requirement-9a/ So basically if you camp fewer than 5 nights then you can count all of the nights, every time. If you camp 5 nights or more than you can only count it once as a long-term camp


Jan 16, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Daron - Your statement about counting everything fewer than 5 nights is incorrect.  In the last bullet on that page you referenced, it also points this out.  A scout going to 5 summer camps and spending 4 nights at each one does not fulfill the requirement.


Jan 20, 2015 - Cliff

Thank you for your response but I would have to agree to disagree on the responsibility of the issuance of the the the card for advancement particularly one such as camping where the participation of the adult leader or counselor is such an integral part. In my mind the camping card should be initiated the scouts very first camp outing and if a 12 year old or his parent(s)does not have the foresight to realize that it is the opportunity  to begin there is a responsibility as an counselor with this knowledge to convey it. Unfortunately turnover in our leadership has revealed that this was a selective endeavor and we now have scouts that began camping three years ago attending most rendezvous and summer camps without records of participation while others that started the same time show the badge completed This vacuum in leadership has led to new counselors that are of the opinion that those scouts without documents will have to start a new. This has left some questioning their future


Jan 20, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Cliff - On Intro to Merit Badges (and other BSA pages), the merit badge process starts by a scout picking a subject of interest, and then getting a blue card from his leader.  A merit badge counselor is a resource to be contacted by the scout, not to initiate the interaction. Camping done with his troop, but before starting the Camping merit badge, can be counted by a scout.  There is an area in every Scout Handbook for a scout to record his camping experiences.


May 20, 2015 - Steve

I have a question about 9.b. - do the two activities (from those listed) need to be on the same campout? For example, we have done an overnight snow camping trip and are planning a 5 mile kayak trip with two nights of camping. Do these two trips combined satisfy 9.b., or should we plan a hike that gains at least 1000' of elevation and do that on our kayak trip? Thanks.


May 20, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Steve - They can be separate campouts.  Your plan sounds fine.


May 25, 2015 - Sue

Re: 8D.  My son has cooked for his all off his advancements (currently a Star rank), and has completed his cooking merit badge. Can any of those cooking experiences count towards this badge?


May 25, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Sue - Your son could certainly ask his Camping merit badge counselor about that.  If the meals meet the requirement, then it's up to his counselor to accept that he did them or not.
Personally, I would prefer to see the scout's skills in action and ask him to do the meals specifically for this requirement.


Jun 14, 2015 - Kathy

Why does our Troop keep telling the Scouts that the Merit Badge requires 20 Campouts?  They don't tell them it's 20 nights.  Can the Troop do that and enforce that as a requirement?


Jun 14, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Kathy - The 'Troop' doesn't have any say in the requirements for a merit badge.  A merit badge is done between a scout and a merit badge counselor.  
And, a merit badge counselor should not change the requirements, such as requiring 20 campouts when the requirement specifically requires 20 nights.


Jul 15, 2015 - Joe

A 4 night camping trip is counted as short-term camping, so shouldn't a 4-night "eagle" week at a scout camp (designed as 4 nights, not 5) count in addition to a regular 6-night camp week with your troop?  For a total of 10 days?


Jul 17, 2015 - Scout

What counts as a conservation project? I have helped with many Eagle Scout projects involving planting and gardening. Would that count?


Jul 19, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Joe - No, the second 'short' week should not be counted.


Jul 19, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Scout - It is up to your merit badge counselor to decide how much and what sort of effort constitutes a conservation project.  It may be as simple as picking up litter, or more involved like planting native trees.


Jul 22, 2015 - Joe

There seem to be definitions for short-term camping and long- term camping:

www.scouting.org/scoutsource/Media/LOS/All.aspx

short-term camping = A camping experience consisting of one to four days and at least one night outdoors.

long-term camping = A camping experience consisting of five or more consecutive days and nights in the outdoors.


If a 4-night camp is too long, then is a 3-night camp acceptable?  What makes 2, 3, or 4 more or less valid?


Jul 22, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Joe - You might read this page for more info from a member of the BSA Advancement team, especially the last listed 'key point'.


Jul 24, 2015 - James Michael

If a scout goes on a two night camp-out does this count as two nights for the camping merit badge?

Thanks -- James Michael


Jul 24, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@James - The requirement states "Camp a total of at least 20 nights...".  If a scout camps out two nights, then that counts as two nights.


Jul 28, 2015 - Joe

Jul 28, 2015 - James Michael

Paul,

I am assuming that a 4 night, 3 night, 2 night, and 1 night camp-out is a short term cam-out and the 4, 3, 2, and 1 nights would count toward the required 20 nights?

James Michael


Jul 28, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Joe - I believe the reasoning for the limitation to a single summer camp experience is to promote camping with the scout's troop.  People from BSA National have stated that the campouts, other than the one summer camp experience, are "normally weekend troop campouts".

@James - Yes, that makes sense to me.


Aug 04, 2015 - Migueld

So if a Scout goes to 2 summer camps for a week and he earns 7 nights credit. He then totally gets 0 on the second? Not even 1 night credit? What if a scout takes Wilderness Survival or Astronomy merit badge at summer camp?


Aug 04, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Migueld - 1: He can only earn up to 6 nights from a summer camp.
2: No nights from the second summer camp.
3: It is irrelevant what merit badge he takes at summer camp.


Aug 30, 2015 - David

For requirement 9b, if a Scout attends a 3-day / 2-night camping trip and participates on a whitewater rafting trip of 6 miles during the second day of the camping trip, does this satisfy requirement 9.b.4 - non-motorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles?


Aug 31, 2015 - Scouter Joe

@David It would fulfill the requirement


Sep 04, 2015 - Scout Mom

I have a question.  Requirement 9b states do 2 of a list of items.  #5 says:
Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.
1 - Did this used to say a 'winter' campout?  I don't remember the 'snow' requirement with my 1st son (now Eagle).
2 - Does going on a troop campout where you planned and packed your own gear for snow count?  What else is required to make an overnight camping experience be a 'snow' camping experience?    




Sep 08, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@ScoutMom - 1. the requirements were changed quite a bit in 2006.
2. As the MB counselor, I would expect the scout to be able to explain what preparation in gear, food, safety, and activities were done particularly for this snow outing.  I would also expect that there was snow already down before the outing.


Nov 14, 2015 - Joe Jones

Our Council has renovated the two area camps in the last couple of years, having put Adirondack bunks in the campsites replacing the old platform tents. In reqmt. 9a. it says a scout needs to sleep in a tent he has pitched and that if a camp provides the tent they don't have to. My question is if one spends the week at one of these camps in an open front bunkhouse, can it still count for the six nights of camping. Arguably the Council could have taken those opportunities away for scouters expecting their time there to count. Just looking for another opinion on this debate.


Nov 14, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Joe - That makes it difficult to fulfill the requirement, and I would not count those nights.  I would expect there is open ground space around the bunkhouses where a scout could pitch his own tent, hammock, or ground sheet for the week.
You might ask the camp director what their view is.
See Bryan's Blog.


Feb 09, 2016 - Scout

On requirement 9a, could something not scout related but church related still work as a camped night?


Feb 09, 2016 - Scouter Paul

@Scout - No, a church outing would not count.


Mar 26, 2016 - Tom

Can anyone clarify what is meant by requirement 9b (5), which states: "Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience." Does this simply mean sleeping outside in the snow in a tent OR would the scout be required to build a snow shelter and sleep in that? OR does it mean something else entirely?


Mar 28, 2016 - Scouter Paul

@Tom - Snow shelter or tent would be ok.


May 22, 2016 - rick

we got a scout that transferred from another troop he only did four week long camps but his old scoutmaster gave him camping merit badge can I take it away since he didn't really earn it  or is that a council thing?


Jun 18, 2016 - Alan Moss

Dear Scouter if out troop dos a 2 night camp about once a month, 4 night camps on some long weekends  and a 5 night at summer camp, I understand that only 1 summer camp counts but dos the 4 nighters count?    


Jun 20, 2016 - Scouter Paul

@Alan - Yours is the first troop I've heard of that does weekend campouts on 'long' weekends because families usually make vacation plans for those long weekends.  I've never met a troop that does any 4-night weekend campouts.  But, if they are regular campouts where the scouts set up their tents, cook their food, and do 'scouting' activities, then it sounds like troop camping to me and could be counted.


Jul 24, 2016 - James Myers

Okay.  I understand about counting only one of the two weeks extended "Summer camp" like at Camp Chawanakee, but what about a 6 days/5 night 58 mile trip up Mt. Whitney?  Since the boy went to Summer Camp, does that mean that he does not get to count any of the Mt. Whitney trip?  Also, the above reference to the Wilderness Survival MB was probably made since the boy had to build and sleep out in a shelter away from the camp.  If our scout canoed across the lake and spent a night in a shelter he built, couldn't that mitigate the issue with "Summer camp?" Our Scout still has plenty of time but still curious.  


Jul 31, 2016 - Scouter Paul

@James - He already got his 6 nights at summer camp so none of the Mt. Whitney nights should be counted.
Your hypothetical night in a shelter at summer camp is still summer camp and should be counted as part of that long-term experience.
This is not just my opinion - this is according to BSA national personnel.  See the link in the Nov 14, 2015 comment above.


Sep 04, 2016 - Liz

For requirement 3 Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass OR a topographical map and a GPS receiver. If no GPS receiver unit is available, explain how to use one to get to your camping spot.
Does this have to be done on an actual campout or can this be satisfied in a meeting environment? It says show, can this be done in our meeting place or does it need to be done on an actual campout. Our next campout we will drive up to our camp site so our SM says this wouldn't count.


Sep 04, 2016 - Scouter Paul

@Liz - The BSA says "If it says 'show or demonstrate,' that is what you must do. Just telling about it isn't enough."
So, in this case, the scout is supposed to make the plan, and actually demonstrate navigating his way to the campsite.  If the troop is driving right to the campsite, that doesn't sound like there would be any opportunity to fulfill the requirement.


Sep 27, 2016 - Chris

Do nights spent in hammocks count toward req. 9a? I don't think they do but I want to know for sure before I go on my next campout


Sep 27, 2016 - Scouter Paul

@Chris - If the scout set up his hammock outdoors on a camping trip, I'd count that the same as him setting up a tent, or a tarp, or a teepee, or a bivy, or no shelter at all.  The idea here is that the scout is camping outdoors, not in a provided shelter.


Oct 12, 2016 - Bill

9a. remains confusing for many.  My troop's interpretation has been very consistent with the guidance on this site, so thank you for the reinforcement.  A question has come up on whether short- term camping with another troop counts toward the 9a. requirement.   I have said yes, but that they do not fulfill the Tenderfoot - 1st Class camping/participation requirement because those specifically state being completed with your troop or patrol.  I'd appreciate your thoughts regarding this interpretation.  Thanks.


Mar 21, 2017 - Dave

If a scout counts nights camping for 2nd class and 1st class can he also count them towards camping merit badge?


Mar 21, 2017 - Scouter Paul

@Dave - Yes, as long as they match the 9a requirement.


Jun 01, 2017 - Scoutmaster

My question pertains to the cooking, planning and duty roster requirements. I have been told by a few parents  in the troop that a scout can use past work that was used for rank andvacment or other merit badges to fulfill requirements 4a, 4b & 8c & 8d.
I disagree, if the scout did those same requirements for a certian rank advacement or a merit badge the they should not be able to double dip. I agree though, if the scout did those activities as part of everyday patrol method as part of a camp out and did not use them for ranking up or a merit badge then I would agree to allow those activities to be counted.
I would appericate your input and interpretation on this.
THank you


Jun 03, 2017 - Scouter Jane

@Scoutmaster - Bryan's Blog had an article on this topic:

Can one activity fulfill two (or more) Scout requirements?

blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2015/10/15/can-one-activity-fulfill-two-or-more-scout-requirements/

And some merit badges specifically say that they cannot be double-counted.  For example, the cooking merit badge (2017) says:

"Note: The meals prepared for Cooking merit badge requirements 4, 5, and 6 will count only toward fulfilling those requirements and will not count toward rank advancement. Meals prepared for rank advancement may not count toward the Cooking merit badge. You must not repeat any menus for meals actually prepared or cooked in requirements 4, 5, and 6."


Jun 29, 2017 - donna

requirement 9B do you have to do them on a camp out.  my son was looking to do the non motorized sport over the summer and already did a bike hike with his dad and recorded the dates


Jun 29, 2017 - Scouter Paul

@donna - Yes, the activities need to be done on Scouting events used in 9A.


Jul 16, 2017 - Kimberly Schwartz

Question regarding Camping MB:  Prerequisite for Summer Camp states that #11 should be done... there is no #11.  Is it tied to the Backpacking #11 MB as they are a joint badge?  


Jul 20, 2017 - Brian

On July 15, 2014, Benjamin asked a question about whether a boy scout camping with a cub pack can count these nights towards the camping MB, but it went unanswered.  Does anybody have an opinion?


Jul 20, 2017 - Scouted Paul

@Brian - I would not count them because the prep, leading, and organization is done by adults in cub scouts.  The boy scout is not participating in boy scout camping.


Jul 21, 2017 - Brian

I'll answer my own question regarding nights a Boy Scout camped with a Cub Scout Pack (as Den Chief):

I read several comments on another site that come down on both sides of the issue.  One of my Assistant Scoutmasters called Irving, Texas. BSA National office told him that as long as the scout was Den Chief and the Camping MB Merit Badge Counselor approved, they were okay with allowing the nights to count towards the total.


Jul 21, 2017 - Brian

Thank you, Paul, for your comment.  I tend to agree with you.  I am still not comfortable with allowing it, even if he is Den Chief, which I forgot to mention in my earlier question.  Cub camping is a different breed.  

If BSA National says it's okay (as long as MB Counselor approves), then I'll go along, albeit somewhat reluctantly.

This scout is only 13, is close on his 20 nights, has up to four or five years to get those last few nights in and would get them soon without utilizing Cub Camp nights.  I don't know what the rush is.


Jul 26, 2017 - Steve Byland

Sir,   My son is trying to complete 9.b number 3.  Taking a bike ride of at least 15 miles or at least 4 hrs.   He is being told that half his patrol must do this or it doesn't count.  He is completing his eagle project and ages out in 30 days.   This is the only requirement holding him back.   Does this sound right?    Thank you for your time.    Steve


Jul 31, 2017 - Scouted Paul

@Steve - "half the patrol" isn't mentioned anywhere in the requirements so that is pretty bogus.  The activity needs to be done on a scouting campout though.


Sep 26, 2017 - Ann

All campouts since becoming a Boy Scout can be counted for 9a.   Can activities done during the campouts in 9a be used to satisfy requirements for 9b, even though the scout didn't have the camping blue card at the time?


Sep 26, 2017 - Scouter Paul

@Ann - Yes.  For the merit badge counselor to approve them, the activities should be verified just like verifying the nights of camping actually happened.


May 14, 2018 - Sue

If my son has friends in another troop and camps with their troop, can those night count towards his nights of camping, or does it have to be with his own troop?


May 14, 2018 - Scouter Paul

@Sue - Yes, they can count.


Feb 07, 2019 - David

For 9b, do the "TWO of the following" have to be on the same campout? So five miles in canoe at a time when there's thick snow on the ground; or rappel downa  30-foot embankment to the waiting canoes; or climb a 1000-foot hill and camp in the snow at the top; or climb a 1000-foot mountain and rappel down a 30-foot cliff on the way back down?

Or can they be on two different campouts; maybe snow-camping in the winter, and canoeing or hiking into the campsite in summer?


Feb 09, 2019 - Jane

@David - Camping merit badge requirement #9.(b) says:

"On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following,only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision."

"[ANY] of these camping experiences" means they could be on the same campout or they could be on different campouts - either way is fine.

I would also note that requirement #9(b)(5). says:

"Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience."

Simply going camping when there is snow on the ground would not meet the requirements - the Scouts would need to actually plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.


Mar 27, 2019 - Lucas

For requirements 8c and 8d, can planning and cooking dehydrated meals as part of a backpacking trip count?


Mar 27, 2019 - Scouter Paul

@Lucas - If I were the merit badge counselor, that would be fine with me.  Requirement #8d says at least one meal must be a trail meal using a lightweight stove, but doesn't say they all can't use it.


Apr 08, 2019 - Dave Holt

With all respect to BSA, this requirement has issues.  To prioritize car camping a bunch of times over a high adventure trip through Northern Tier or Philmont is ridiculous.  The scout will learn far more from the high adventure trip about camping then they will ever learn car camping.  I personally feel that high adventure trips should not be included in the "maximum 6 nights at a long term camp" clause and despite having read all of the explanations, can't see any good argument for it.  Six nights max from summer camp is totally fine.  No response needed.  Just voicing my $0.02.


Nov 20, 2019 - Eric Fredrickson

My daughter has worked her way up to 10 scout camping nights so far, but one of them was spent in a snow cave she built herself. Would that count for the camping requirement? I feel like it certainly fulfils the spirit of the requirement. Building a snow cave is actually trickier than pitching a tent. (Not as forgiving of mistakes)


Nov 20, 2019 - Scouter Paul

@Eric - I agree.  If I was her merit badge counselor, I'd count it.  Hammocks would count also.  The idea is not sleeping in a cabin, shelter, RV, trailer, or other prebuilt protection.


Dec 01, 2019 - Marc

My son's troop goes together to a traditional summer camp. He got 6 nights there and has had additional weekend trips with the troop. In June, he attended NYLT for 6 nights. It is not a typical summer camp. They pitch tents, backpack, and change sleeping locations as well as carry in ingredients for and cook their planned meals. Would NYLT count in addition to summer camp?


Dec 02, 2019 - Scouter Paul

@Marc - NYLT is a "long-term camping experience".  So would any other BSA camp of similar duration.  Only one of these long-term camping experiences should be counted.


Dec 12, 2019 - MeLinda

My daughter has her 6 nights from summer camp and took NYLT. However, NYLT here is broken into 2 weekends similar to Wood Badge. Friday to Sunday so 2 nights each weekend.  Do these 4 extra nights count?  Most people hear NYLT and say no since typically its a week straight.

Thanks!


Dec 13, 2019 - Scouter Paul

@Melinda - If the NYLT experience was run like regular campouts where the scouts use tents, cook their food, and do 'scouting' activities, then it sounds like troop camping to me and could be counted.


Mar 10, 2020 - Bill

Scouter Paul, I sincerely appreciate your guidance on all merit badge procedures. I have gained a lot of information through these forums. I realize this thread is quite old and I hate to stir the pot a little more, But on the issue of requirement 9a I have to disagree with your interpretation of the requirement.
Having an asterisk preceding the statement of "one long-term camping experience" I am reading this statement as an example not as a limiter. The word "One", I feel, could be replaced with the word "A" as in "A long-term camping experience" which may be read as any long term camping trip. The limiting term of this statement is in the days counted, "up to six consecutive nights" not the word "One". If they intended that only one of these outings were to count they would have stated so by writing "ONLY one long-term camping experience" will count. If they are out sleeping under the stars with their group, I don't think I can see any justifiable reason not to credit them with the with the night.


Mar 10, 2020 - Scouter Paul

@Bill - The asterisk in 9a refers to the preceding statement.

A reason for not crediting the night you mention is because the requirement specifically says to not credit it - even if it doesn't seem fair.

As has been posted above, please read Bryan on Scouting for the BSA Advancement team's words, not my interpretation. They say...

  • A long-term camping experience is defined as at least five consecutive nights. One of these experiences is allowed, and up to six nights may count toward the requirement. For example, Sunday through Saturday. If a Scout goes on a 10-night trek, only six of those nights counts.
  • If a Scout goes to summer camp twice for a total of 12 nights, only one of the summer camps will count - for up to six nights.
  • (regarding longterm camp) ...As a workaround they suggest they will send their son to summer camp, but then take him home after four nights so the experience will not count as a long-term camp. This doesn't fulfill the requirement.

Mar 11, 2020 - Jane

I'm not seeing the asterisk in the 2020 Scout Requirements book.  Could it be from an older version of the merit badge requirements?

Maybe they took it out because the note is not really necessary, because the Guide to Advancement says: "It is the counselor’s decision whether to accept work or activities completed prior to the issuing of the signed blue card. Common sense should prevail, however. For example, nights already camped as a Scout in Scouts BSA or as a qualified Venturer or Sea Scout, or coins or stamps already collected, would count toward their respective badges." and also "All merit badge requirements must be met while a registered Scout in Scouts BSA, or a qualified Venturer or Sea Scout. Accomplishments before joining, or while a Cub Scout, do not apply."

Back on topic: The BSA has given their interpretation at Bryan on Scouting's Ask the Expert (link in Scouter Paul's post above).  A Scout has the option to use one long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights.  One means one, so more than one long-term camping experience would not count for this merit badge.


Apr 10, 2020 - Jackie

For 9b2, my interpretation is that the backpacking of at least 4 miles is for a single event.  Meaning that you cannot add a two mile trek to another 2 mile trek in order to meet the 4 mile requirement. Do you agree?


Apr 10, 2020 - Scouter Paul

@Jackie - I agree with you.  A scout could backpack in 2 miles, stay overnight, and backpack out 2 miles.  But, a scout backpacking in 1/2 mile and out 1/2 mile each weekend for a month would not work.


Apr 10, 2020 - Jackie

I suppose my comment wasn’t entirely clear.  Most of the 9b sub-items say “at least”. I was taking that to be for a single trekking event not an accumulation over even a single camp out.  For example, I wouldn’t expect 3 reppels of 10 to count for 9b6. Therefore, I would think at least 4 miles is a minimum. It doesn’t say backpack for 4 miles.


Apr 10, 2020 - Scouter Paul

@Jackie - I wouldn't expect three 10-foot rappels to count either.   For the walking, bike riding, or watercraft trek I would count the distance or time covered on a single outing.  If not, I could see someone possibly not counting a 4-mile backpack if it included a stop to sleep, to eat, to swim, to get a drink, ... or any reason.


Apr 14, 2020 - Jackie

For 9b2, I just got a response back from a Certified Registrar at BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, CAPITOL AREA COUNCIL.

"I talked it over with another staff member, who also is a Scoutmaster, we believe it is four straight miles. That is our interpretation based on all other requirements in this and other merit badges and ranks."


Apr 14, 2020 - Jane

@Jackie - Maybe I am misunderstanding what you are saying, but when the BSA uses the term "hike", it is referring to the miles hiked on a single day.  For example, the Hiking merit badge specifies that Scouts may stop for short rest periods or meals, but not overnight.

On the other hand, when the BSA uses the term backpacking, it usually refers to miles covered over the entire trek.  So to backpack for at least 4 miles would mean 4 miles on a single trek (trip), but could be spread out over multiple days.  Scouter Paul's example of a backpacking trip of 2 miles in, staying overnight, and 2 miles back out would be backpacking for a minimum of 4 miles on a single trek.  Unlike hiking, the 4 miles do not all have to be done on the same day, but they do need to be done on the same trek.  Compare with the Backpacking merit badge, where the mileage given is for the entire trek, not each day of the trek.


Apr 14, 2020 - Jackie

@Jane - Thanks for the extra feedback. I did go and review the Backpacking MB and interestingly there was a requirement that said: "9.   Do the following:  a.    Write a plan that includes a schedule for a patrol/crew backpacking hike of at least 2 miles." . . . "e.    While using the plan you developed for requirement 9a, carry your fully loaded pack to complete a hike of at least 2 miles." So, this seems to indicate a single hiking event with your backpack. There are other parts of the Backpacking MB that use the word trek for indicating the requirement could be completed over multiple days of the same camping trip.

So, at the very least, Camping 9b2 should be updated to add clarification.


May 11, 2020 - Jared Chapman

Does family camping at a BSA facility count for the camping merit badge during this COVID time?


May 11, 2020 - Jane

@Jared Chapman - As a camping merit badge counselor, my first question would be:  Was the family camping at the BSA facility done as part of "designated Scouting activities or events"?

The Scout should ask his or her camping merit badge counselor for guidance.


Jul 21, 2020 - Bill Sternhagen

Regarding Camping requirement 9.b(2).   Would appreciate feedback on the term "backpack".  Does this mean a full pack for an overnighter or daypack or possibly none?
When I read the other options, it seems the intent is not necessarily to bring/carry all gear.  A five mile float is much easier than a 4 mile hike, especially if a full pack is required.  
Thank you


Jul 22, 2020 - Scouter Paul

@Bill - I believe "backpacking" should follow the normal use as in the Backpacking merit badge - that is carrying all your gear on your back, rather than base camping or car camping. 9.b(1) specifically uses "hike" so there appears to be an intended difference in the two requirements.


Jul 28, 2020 - Mayank - Life Scout

Hi, I have a question about 8d, While camping in the outdoors, cook at least one breakfast, one lunch,
and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of
a lightweight stove.
Do I have to cook one meal while I am on the trail? Or can I cook all the meals in camp? Also, for the other 2 meals, if not a lightweight stove(I understand I can use a stove for all 3 meals), what alternatives could I use to cook the meals, meaning do they all have to be cooked using heat, or could it be something like a cold sandwich?
Thanks!


Jul 28, 2020 - Scouter Paul

@Mayank - Since the requirement defines the kind of meal but not the location, I would have no problem with the "trail meal" being cooked in camp.
For the other meals, I believe that information is in the merit badge pamphlet which you should have and reference.  There are many different ways to cook food - utensil-less, dutch oven, foil-wrapped, etc.
I interpret "cook" to mean using heat to make something inedible edible.  For example, a hamburger or chicken breast, but not a hotdog or grilled cheese or cold sandwich.


Mar 14, 2021 - Henry

Regarding 4.a. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member.

If summer camp is actual camping - can a MB counselor have the scouts make duty rosters for how the patrols are organized for summer camp.
I know only 1 week will count towards camping nights. But would making the duty roster for the patrol count for 4.a.

Regarding 7.b. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.

If they are backpacking most will be carrying all of their own gear. There is usually little to no troop gear. If the scouts are buddied up and each carries their own gear and one carries food the other the stove, fuel and water filter - distributing the weight equally - will this meet the requirement? Or does the food have to be divided and some type of patrol gear added if not needed?


Mar 15, 2021 - Scouter Paul

@Henry - 4.a. Yes, the patrol is camping and the scout makes a duty roster.  Sounds like it fulfills the requirement.
7.b. - Yes, the patrol's gear and food is one pile of stuff to be fairly divided between the scouts.  It doesn't make sense to add gear that is not needed.  I expect there may be other patrol gear besides cooking and water filter, though - like first aid kit, tents, food hanging system, sunscreen, insect repellent, and other shared items.


Jul 07, 2021 - Sri

Hi all, I have 2 questions regarding 4b
1) Does each scout doing the MB need to work with one unit/petrol? What if there are not enough units/petrols?
2) Does the scout doing the MB need to go on the actual campout with unit/petrol? Or should he just help prepare and guide them?


Jul 07, 2021 - Scouter Paul

@Sri - 1) One scout could help with one campout, and another scout could help with a different campout.  Two scouts could help one patrol if the merit badge counselor approves, but when a requirement is shared like that, typically one scout takes charge and the other does very little.
2) The requirement says to help set up camp, so the scout does need to go to the campout.  It doesn't say the scout must camp with the patrol being assisted.


Jul 08, 2021 - Jen

requirement 9b - could one of these be requirements be met at summer camp?   example: while at traditional BSA summer camp, 1) scout rappels down a man-made tower of 30 feet?  or 2) scout completes a long canoe or kayak trip that is 5 or more miles long? or 3) scout hikes up a mountain with at least 1000 feet in vertical gain?

The scout can count the 6 nights (one time only) toward the 9a requirement.  Can they also count that summer camp toward 9b if they do the above while at the summer camp?


Jul 08, 2021 - Scouter Paul

@Jen - Yes, they can.


Jul 27, 2021 - Srini

Hi,
Does req 9c need to be done while camping at that facility? I find it very hard to find a conservation project at the same time we are scouting. Can we just do it as a separate event? Since the requirement says we can do it alone, i guess it is ok to do any conservation project to coverthis requirement at the scout convenience. Thanks a lot for your prompt responses


Jul 29, 2021 - Srini

Hi, i want to clarify me last question. I meant "I find it very hard to find a conservation project at the same time scouts are camping"
I would like to know if scouts can do any conservation project as part of this requirement


Aug 06, 2021 - Scouter Paul

@Srini - Pretty much every place our troop has ever camped has had opportunities to do conservation work.  When the person or organization that owns or manages the location where your troop wants to camp is contacted about camping there, it's very easy to ask about doing a project at the same time.
But, yes, a separate conservation project could be done.


Sep 19, 2021 - Raymond

@Srini - So the conservation project does not need to be done by the entire Troop if that does not fit with the program for your campout.   There is not time requirement and Conservation could be many different things, Trail work, erosion control, Planting of Trees or other plants, Bird houses, Bat houses, etc.  It just needs to be approved by the land owner's or managing organization.  It could take 1 hour or the entire day.  Whenever looking at requirements you should always follow the written requirements and follow the guide to safe scouting.  


Oct 05, 2021 - Ray

Do you start counting campouts from the time the Camping Merit Badge Blue Card was signed?  Or can you start counting campouts from the day the kid becomes a boy scout?


Oct 05, 2021 - Scouter Paul

@Ray - For Camping merit badge, all campouts since the Scout joined the troop should count.



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Sours: https://www.boyscouttrail.com/boy-scouts/meritbadges/camping-merit-badge.asp

Camping Merit Badge

2021 Scouts BSA Requirements

Please arrive with ample time prior to the start time of your class for registration. Remember, there will be others checking in as well that registration may take a little time, depending on the size of the class and the event held in conjunction with the class.

Your Scout uniform is required to be worn when attending this merit badge session. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact Brian Reiners (Scoutmater Bucky) via email at [email protected] or on the phone at 612-483-0665.

Reviewing the merit badge pamphlet PRIOR to attending and doing preparation work will ensure that Scouts get the most out of these class opportunities. The merit badge pamphlet is a wealth of information that can make earning a merit badge a lot easier. It contains many of the answers and solutions needed or can at least provide direction as to where one can find the answers.

It is NOT acceptable to come unprepared to a Scoutmaster Bucky event. You can (and should) use the Scoutmaster Bucky Camping Merit Badge Workbook to help get a head start and organize your preparation work. Please note that the use of any workbook is merely for note taking and reference. Completion of any merit badge workbook does not warrant, guarantee, or confirm a Scout's completion of any merit badge requirements.

It should be noted that this merit badge class is not meant for those who just want to come and see what they can get done. It is possible to complete this merit badge by being properly prepared and having done the preparation work prior to the class. Preparation is a MUST! If you are not willing to participate to these expectations and standards, perhaps the Scoutmaster Bucky opportunity is not for you.

Things to remember to bring for this merit badge class:

  • Merit badge blue card properly filled out and signed off by your Scoutmaster
  • Camping Merit Badge Pamphlet
  • Scout uniform
  • Supporting documentation or project work pertinent to the Camping merit badge, which may also include a merit badge workbook for reference with notes
  • A positive Scouting focus and attitude

Please read and understand the Scoutmaster Bucky Blue Card Process.

Please arrive with ample time prior to the start time of your class to ensure your connection to the online session is working properly. Ask people in your household to refrain from unnecessary internet usage, including but not limited to: streaming videos, online gaming, and other heavy bandwidth usage.

You will receive a link 12 to 24 hours before the class start time. Notification will come through the email address provided during the registration process, so please make sure you enter your email correctly.

Your Scout Uniform is required to be worn when attending this Online Merit Badge session. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact Brian Reiners; Scoutmaster Bucky via email at [email protected] or on the phone at 612-483-0665.

Reviewing the Merit Badge Pamphlet PRIOR to attending and doing preparation work will insure that Scouts get the most out of these online class opportunities. The Merit Badge Pamphlet is a wealth of information that can make earning a Merit Badge a lot easier. It contains many of the answers and solutions needed or can at least provide direction as to where one can find the answers.

It is NOT acceptable to come unprepared to a Scoutmaster Bucky event. You can (and should) use the Scoutmaster Bucky American Business Merit Badge Workbook to help get a head start and organize your preparation work. Please note that the use of any workbook is merely for note taking and reference. Completion of any Merit Badge Workbook does not warrant, guarantee, or confirm a Scouts completion of any merit badge requirement(s). You can download the Scoutmaster Bucky Camping Merit Badge Workbook for taking notes to help you prepare.

It should be noted that this Merit Badge class is not meant for those who just want to come and see what they can get done. It is possible to complete this Merit Badge by being properly prepared and having done the preparation work prior to the class. Preparation is a MUST! If you are not willing to participate to these expectations and standards, perhaps the Scoutmaster Bucky opportunity is not for you.

Please make sure you read the top portion of this page for general participation expectations in a Scoutmaster Bucky merit badge class.

Pay careful attention to the action verbs within the requirements. An example to note:

"Tell", "explain", "describe", and "discuss" are commonly used and will require the Scout to perform these actions during the class. When these action verbs are a part of any requirement, Scouts are expected to be prepared to share. Reading responses is not acceptable since it does not fulfill the requirement of showing the Scout's knowledge and understanding.

Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in camping activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.

Discuss with your counselor why it is important to be aware of weather conditions before and during your camping activities. Tell how you can prepare should the weather turn bad during your campouts.

Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation.

Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal and group plan for implementing these principles on your next outing.

Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot by using a topographical map and one of the following:

If a GPS-equipped device is not available, explain how to use one to get to your camping spot.

A smartphone with a GPS app

If a GPS-equipped device is not available, explain how to use one to get to your camping spot.

Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member.

Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.

Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering."

Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet.

Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding).

List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed.

Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.

Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent.

Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water.

Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent.

Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.

Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following:

Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed.

Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.

Explain the safety procedures for:

Using a propane or butane/propane stove

Using a liquid fuel stove

Proper storage of extra fuel

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves.

Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination.

While camping in the outdoors, cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.

Show experience in camping by doing the following:

Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision.

Hike up a mountain, gaining at least 1,000 vertical feet.

Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles.

Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours.

Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles.

Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.

Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more.

Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. This can be done alone or with others.

Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Scout Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

Sours: https://scoutmasterbucky.com/merit-badges/camping/
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If you’re wanting to earn the Eagle-required Camping merit badge, you’re in the right place! In this guide, I’ll be providing you with all of the answers that you’ll need to complete your merit badge worksheet. In the process, you’ll also build a lifelong understanding of outdoor techniques to prepare you for any backpacking trek or campout!

You’ve reached part 2 of my ultimate guide to the Camping merit badge! If you’re new to ScoutSmarts, you should first check out part 1 for the answers to requirements 1-4 of the Camping merit badge.

If you’ve just come over from part one, congratulations! You’re halfway done. Once you finish this badge, you’ll be equipped with the knowledge needed to safely and comfortably camp in almost any situation. Give yourself a big pat on the back. 🙂

It’s time to get back into it! Take a minute to closely review and think through requirements 5-10 of the Camping merit badge:

What Are The Camping Merit Badge Answers?

  1. Do the following:
    a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term “layering.”
    b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet.
    c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding).
    d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed.
    e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.
  2. Do the following:
    a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent.
    b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water.
    c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent.
    d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.
  3. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following:
    a. Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed.
    b. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.
  4. Do the following:
    a. Explain the safety procedures for:

    I) Using a propane or butane/propane stove
    —II)Using a liquid fuel stove
    III) Proper storage of extra fuel
    b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves.
    c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination.
    d. While camping in the outdoors, cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.
  5. Show experience in camping by doing the following:
    a. Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events.* One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.
    b. On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision:
    —I) Hike up a mountain where, at some point, you are at least 1,000 feet higher in elevation from where you started.
    —II) Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles.
    —III) Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours.
    —IV) Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles.
    —V) Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.
    —VI) Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more.
    c) Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. This can be done alone or with others.
  6. Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Scout Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

Camping Merit Badge Requirement 5:

5a) Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term “layering.”

An important part of being prepared is making sure to pack the right amount of clothing to remain comfortable in any environment. Being too cold on a campout is the worst! On the other hand, you don’t want to overpack and need to carry all that heavy gear around. In this section, I’ll be teaching you the best items to pack for both cold and warm campouts!

Packing for Warm Campouts

In warm, sunny environments, I’d recommend packing the following articles of clothing:

  • Sunglasses
  • Sunscreen
  • A hat
  • A light rain jacket or poncho (You never know when the weather could change)
  • Suitable footwear
  • Extra socks and underwear
  • An extra towel (For sun protection or swimming)
  • Light, breathable shirts (like a tank top or dry-fit shirt)

Personally, whenever I go camping, I always bring a wide-brimmed hat, a light jacket, a rain jacket, and a pair of extra warm socks. These are items that I find myself using practically every time — regardless of whether the campout is in warm or cold weather! Speaking of cold weather…

Packing for Cold Campouts

In cold, windy environments, I’d recommend packing the following articles of clothing:

  • A warm beanie or cap
  • A puffy coat or jacket that can protect you from the windchill
  • A rain jacket or poncho
  • Extra-warm socks (in a pinch, just wear 2-3 pairs at once!)
  • Warm long-sleeved shirts
  • Gloves or mittens
  • Long underwear or thermals
  • Clothing that you can easily add or remove for layering

During cold campouts, you’ll obviously need more than just a t-shirt to stay warm. This is why the beanie, socks, and gloves are so useful! In most cases, your body’s warmth will escape from your head, hands, and feet. So, having these articles of clothing will help you to trap in heat. Another way to trap heat close to your body is called layering.

What Is Layering?

Layering means wearing multiple articles of clothing over each other so that you can achieve the right level of warmth. For example, wearing a t-shirt, light jacket, hoodie, and then a waterproof snow jacket over all of that would be considered layering!

Layering can help you to keep warm because your body will heat the inner layers, and you’ll be insulated from the cold by the outside layers. You can even remove or add clothing if you begin to overheat or get too cold. Basically, layering is a great way to easily and precisely control your body’s temperature! 🙂

5b) Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet.

When determining the right footwear to take on a camp, the main thing you should consider is the environment you’ll be heading into. Does the weather report predict rain? How cold will it get at night? Will it be sunny so that my shoes can dry if they get wet? These are all very important questions to ask yourself when choosing the right camping footwear!

When deciding on what footwear you’ll pack for camp, I’d highly suggest speaking to your Patrol Leader, SPL, or Scoutmaster and asking them their opinion. It’s likely they’ve been on the camp before, and can give you some great pointers! To serve as a general guideline though, below are the best types of footwear for different weather conditions:

  • In wet, humid environments: You’ll need to pack light shoes that can be dried quickly and are resistant to moisture damage.
    • Slow-drying shoes can mean an increased chance of blisters and foot infections.
    • I’d suggest packing a few pairs of extra socks as well.
  • In icy environments with snow: you’ll need warm, water-resistant boots with strong traction.
    • Slipping and cold feet will probably be your biggest concerns.
    • If you’ll be hiking in the snow, I’d suggest using crampons (Amazon link to show you what crampons look like).
  • In cold, damp environments: You’ll want to pack insulated, warm, waterproof shoes that will stand up to the outdoor conditions.
    • Sturdy waterproof boots are ideal for these kinds of conditions, as they’ll keep your feet dry and warm.
  • In warm, mild environments: A light, breathable pair of canvas or hiking shoes will be fine.
    • If your troop allows it, you may also want to bring a pair of slippers or sandals to use around camp so that you’ll have a change of footwear if your feet start to get too hot.

Another thing to consider when choosing the right footwear is the type of physical activity your troop will be doing. Will you be running, playing sports, or hiking? If so, you’ll need supportive shoes that can stand up to these tasks. I don’t know what your troop will be doing, so seriously, talk to your Scoutmaster to hear what they recommend. 😉

Failing to choose the right footwear is one of the biggest mistakes that inexperienced campers make. If you’re looking to buy a new pair of footwear for Scouting, there are some key things you must know! To learn more, check out my Complete Guide To Choosing Scouting Footwear.

5c) Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding).

Keeping your equipment properly cared for will prolong its usability and save you a lot of money in the long run! Proper care means emptying, cleaning, washing, and drying your gear following each campout. After your gear has been cleaned, it should be stored dry and out of direct sunlight, in an area free of pests.

Quick tips when caring for camping gear:

  • Funky odors are caused by bacteria. You can reduce the smell and kill the bacteria by washing your equipment and then leaving it in direct sunlight to dry (not for thin/sensitive gear)!
  • Always shake out bedding and sleeping mats to remove any twigs, bugs, or debris. These could damage your equipment and cause punctures while in storage.
  • If your clothes really smell, you can place them in a bucket filled with a 1/2 cup of baking soda and water overnight. This will eliminate smells like smoke or sweat!
  • After washing my shoes with a hose, I always removed the insoles and left them out in the sun to dry. Doing this airs your shoes out and the sunlight kills the bacteria, which beats tossing your dirty shoes into the washing machine.
5d) List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed.

Outdoor essentials can vary based on the nature of your camping environment. Once you’ve been camping for some time, you’ll have a better sense of what equipment you commonly use and what to bring. However, the BSA says that 10 essentials should always be on your packing list. These items are known as the 10 Outdoor essentials. Here they are:

The BSA’s 10 Outdoor Essentials

  1. A Map and Compass (Or some other navigation method)
  2. A Headlamp
  3. Sun protection
  4. A First aid kit
  5. A Pocket Knife or Multitool
  6. Firestarter
  7. A Tent, Tarp, or Other Form of Shelter
  8. Extra Food
  9. Extra Water or a Water Purifier
  10. Extra Clothes and Raingear

I don’t want this article to be too long, as you probably already have a pretty good idea of what gear you take along to campouts. However, for a complete checklist of my favorite 21 essentials to bring camping (and some additional items to impress your friends), check out my Essential Scout Camp Packing List!

5e) Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.

If you’ve read the previous sections along with part 1 of my guide to the Camping merit badge, by now you should be prepared for an overnight campout. Pack your bag according to the above checklist, look sharp wearing your class-A uniform, and get ready for an amazing camping trip! You’re ready. 🙂

Camping Merit Badge Requirement 6:

6a) Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent.

In this day and age, there are thousands of brands and varieties of tents out there. However, almost all tents can be grouped into 1 of 4 categories based on their shape. Here are the 4 different types of tents: A-Frame tents, Pyramid tents, Hoop tents, and Dome tents. In this section, I’ll be explaining each of the 4 tent types in a bit more detail!

A-Frame Tent

A-frame tent Scout
  • A-Frame tents: A-Frame tents take on a triangular, “Letter-A” shape and are often supported by a pole on each end. These tents tend to have ample floor area, but not a lot of air space, as the sides slope inward in a triangle shape. These are the tents my troop used, and are generally a popular, inexpensive option for camping!

Dome Tents

Scout Dome tent
  • Dome tents: Another very popular type of tent, dome tents are usually made with poles that criss-cross over their middle in a “dome” shape. These types of tents are strong and spacious, so they’re a great option for most conditions. In fact, my current tent is a dome tent!

Hoop Tents

Scout Hoop tent
  • Hoop tents: Hoop tents create their frame by bending poles in a half-circle and connecting their sidewalls to those poles (the image is a very large hoop tent; most look like that but are smaller). Therefore, most hoop tents only consist of 2 or 3 long poles.

Pyramid Tents

Scout Pyramid Tent
  • Pyramid tents: Pyramid tents are supported in their middle by a single pole, with the tent’s fabric being pulled out and pegged on each of its sides. From what I’ve seen, pyramid tents aren’t too popular as a smaller tent type, since the central pole can get in the way. However, I’ve made this structure with a tarp and a hiking pole while backpacking, and it works pretty well in a pinch!

Tents should be pitched away from places where water may pool, in areas clear of roots and sharp sticks. Make sure to never pitch your tent under dead or dry trees, as in heavy winds branches could fall and injure you. After a camp, tents should be cleaned, fully dried, and stored in a cool environment until their next use.

How To Care For Your Tent

An important part of camping is properly caring for your tent after you’re all finished. Remember, you’ll need to sleep in your tent again on the next campout, so you want to make sure it’s kept in great condition!

To keep your tent in great condition, here are a few keys to keep in mind:

  • Always make sure your tent is completely dry before storing it. A wet tent will grow mildew, stink, and fall apart much sooner. This is my most important tip, BY FAR.
  • When using your tent, always use 2 hands when operating your zippers. Tents are designed to be taut and can tear if you carelessly pull on the zippers without bringing the fabric together.
  • Never throw your tent into a washer or clean it with strong soaps. This can ruin the waterproofing. Instead, use water or mild dish soap.
  • Never pitch a tent on sticks, sharp rocks, or jagged surfaces. Punctures are more likely than you’d expect.
  • Shake your tent out before putting it away. Rolling it up with loose items can also lead to punctures.

After a while, your tent may become so dirty with sap, mud, and gunk that it may require a more complete clean. No worries! I’d recommend watching the quick video (1:52) below to learn how to conduct a thorough cleaning of any tent:

Being able to properly care for your tools isn’t just an important skill for camping — It’ll help you throughout the rest of your life as well! Proper tent maintenance will save you a lot of money and headaches in the long run, so make sure you do this step right. 🙂

6b) Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water.

What does the Scout Law teach us? A scout is clean! Camp sanitation is important in preventing foodborne illnesses and insect infestations. Unsanitary camp conditions can lead to consuming spoiled food, which may result in indigestion, food poisoning, or diarrhea.

Since drinking untreated water can cause illness, it’s important to purify it so that it’s suitable for human consumption. When camping, three methods of water purification are typically used:

  • Boiling
  • Iodine droplets
  • Filtration

Demonstrating two of these purification methods should be fairly straightforward. Simply find some clear fresh water and boil it. Then, depending on your equipment, you can either drop an iodine tablet into your remaining water or run it through a pump filter.

When finding water to purify, it’s important to choose the cleanest source of water, possible. You should avoid trying to purify murky water unless it’s a last resort, and instead try to purify water from moving streams or large lakes. Also, keep in mind that boiling and iodine tablets won’t remove heavy sediment in your water, so always use a water filter, when possible.

6c) Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent.

Tents should be pitched over debris-free areas on a slight incline. By doing this, in the event of heavy rains, the water will flow away from your tent rather than pooling where you sleep. Also, avoid pitching your tent in a sensitive meadow area and instead, place it on short grass or insensitive ground. Move any branches too, as these could puncture the floor of your tent.

For your own safety, always pitch your tent with a side wall facing into the wind. Never face your tent opening into the wind. Otherwise, your tent might be blown away! Especially in heavy winds, be careful of camping under trees, as their falling branches could be dangerous and unpredictable.

6d) Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Both internal and external frame backpacks come with a metal frame to support your back while hiking. However, an internal frame pack has the frame built into the backpack and is more form-fitting. On the other hand, an external frame packhas a metal frame on the outside of the bag which can be used for attaching gear or distributing weight.

External-Frame Backpacks

External-frame packs tend to leave a space between the bag and your body which provides a cooling airflow. These bags pull your center of gravity backward and are good for hiking groomed trails where you often need to redistribute weight among different parts of your back. However, external-frame packs are bulky and can snag easily. Therefore, these bags may not be ideal for difficult trails.

Internal-Frame Backpacks

Internal-frame packs have recently become more popular, as they sit closer to your back and have less risk of snagging. These bags push your center of gravity forward, which helps with your stability but may feel uncomfortable during flat, easy hikes. Internal-frame packs are also typically more expensive than external-frame but are well-suited for maneuvering challenging trails.

6e) Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.

There are many different types of sleeping bag styles such as the rectangular sleeping bag, barrel-shaped sleeping bag, and mummy sleeping bag. However, these bag-type differences are usually not too important. Since sleeping bags can differ by brand, the main things to look out for are the bag material, temperature rating, and care instructions.

However, if you’d like to see the different styles of sleeping bags to better fulfill the requirement, check out the informative video (2:31) below. At the 50-second mark, you’ll get a great walkthrough of the sleeping bag styles I mentioned earlier:

The most important thing to consider when purchasing a sleeping bag is the temperature that you’ll be using it in. Each sleeping bag comes with a temperature rating at which it will be most effectively used. Assess the conditions that you’ll be camping in, and pick a lightweight bag most suitable to your needs.

To keep your sleeping bag in good condition, you should avoid using it on rough, uncovered ground. Sleeping bags should be cleaned often, according to the manufacturer’s instructions, and be stored dry. A good sleeping bag can easily last you your entire Scouting career!

Camping Merit Badge Requirement 7:

Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following:
7a) Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed.
7b) Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness. 

Here’s a great example checklist for camping gear, but I’d encourage you to create your own based on your past experience.

When packing your gear for a campout, you should always place the items you’ll need sooner, closer to the top of your bag. This way, you won’t waste time looking through your pack when you’re retrieving something you know you’ll need! Don’t worry if you’re not sure how to do this, I’ll teach you a great trick that I use. 😉

Here’s the trick: Before packing, take the time to think through exactly what you’ll be doing as you arrive at your campsite. Close your eyes if it helps, and just walk yourself through the day of the camp. Often, this is how it’ll go:

  1. First, you’ll hike in
  2. You’ll pitch your tent
  3. Then, you’ll make dinner
  4. After that, you’ll get changed
  5. Finally, you might have some free time

Therefore, you should pack your bag in the following order, from top to bottom:

  • You should have water and snacks near the top of your bag (for the hike)
  • Below that, pack your tent supplies (for camp setup)
  • Then, pack your cooking supplies (for dinner)
  • Under that, pack your change of clothes
  • Finally, pack whatever you’ll need during your free time at the bottom of your pack (like your Scout handbook to work on requirements).

While packing things in the order that you’ll need them is a good rule of thumb for most items, there’s one exception to keep in mind. Items that are used in emergencies should always be easily accessible from your pack, even if you don’t think you’ll need them.Here are some items that should always be kept within reach:

  • A First-Aid Kit
  • Water
  • A Backpack Rain Cover and Rain Jacket
  • Your Pocket Knife

Camping Merit Badge Requirement 8:

8a) Explain the safety procedures for:
I) Using a propane or butane/propane stove
—II) Using a liquid fuel stove
III) Proper storage of extra fuel

Fuel-powered stoves are one of the most important tools your troop will be bringing along to campouts. That’s why, it’s important to learn how camping stoves work, as well as how to safe while using one!

Before we dive into how to properly use different types of camping stoves, I’d highly recommend watching the informative video (5:12) below. In it, you’ll learn about the types of fuel available, as well as how to choose the best-suited stove for your campout. 🙂

Hopefully, you now have a good idea of the types of stoves that are out there! What kind of stove does your troop use? Mine used a 2-burner propane stove. In the next section, I’ll be giving you a few tips so that you can safely use any type of camp stove!

8a-I) Using a Propane or Butane/Propane Stove

There are always risks involved when working with an open flame, so be sure to set up your stove away from anything that may catch fire. When working with propane, it’s easy to have your flame set too high, which will waste fuel. The ideal setting is for the flame to burn blue and hug the bottom of your pan, not for it to go up the sides.

Here are a few more tips to keep in mind when using a propane or butane stove:

  • Make sure to set your stove up on a level surface that’s clear of debris.
  • Don’t run your stove on plastic surfaces. In my troop, our patrol accidentally melted the top of a plastic table after cooking for about 30 minutes. 🙁
  • Avoid running your propane stove if it’s exposed to strong winds. Often, stoves have side barriers that can block strong breezes.
  • Roll up any loose or flowy clothing while cooking, as that could be a fire hazard.
  • Propane stoves should always be used in open-air, with lots of exposure to fresh oxygen.
  • Never leave your stove unattended while on.
  • After you’re done cooking, be sure to fully switch off the gas before disconnecting it from the stove.

Also, these stoves need to be connected to a propane canister, so always check if the connections are fully tightened. This can be done by applying soapy water to the areas where the canister is fastened. Small bubbles should form if the canister is not securely sealed. If the seals are not fully connected, you should also smell the propane (a rotten egg-like scent).

8a-II) Using a liquid fuel stove

Liquid fuel stoves are pretty similar to propane stoves so you should follow the same safety procedures. However, these stoves are often smaller and can be a little bit harder to use, as they need to be primed before lighting. Here’s how to prime a liquid fuel stove:

  1. Connect the liquid fuel canister to your stove.
  2. Open the canister to release a little bit of fuel into the burner.
  3. Then, close the canister and light the burner.
  4. Once lit for a few minutes and warmed up, slowly reopen the fuel canister.

On second thought, if you’ve never used a liquid fuel stove before, these instructions might not make too much sense… Not to worry, though! Here’s a quick and helpful video (2:48) that will visually guide you through the entire process of priming and lighting a liquid fuel stove:

Liquid fuel stoves may be more difficult to use, but perform better than propane stoves in cold weather, and can also be refilled. This makes these types of stoves great for long backpacking trips where you’re trying to be more fuel-efficient to keep your pack weight low. As with all stoves, keep the fuel bottle is kept as far away from the flames as possible.

8a-III) Proper storage of extra fuel

I shouldn’t need to say this, but fuel is extremely flammable! Do not leave your fuel anywhere near a campfire. Make sure to regularly check for leaks, and monitor the level of your remaining fuel. Store your fuel at room temperature and refill the tanks, when necessary. Doing so will ensure that you have ample fuel for your next campout!

8b) Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves.

A few different types of cooking stoves are white gas stoves, kerosene stoves, cartridge stoves, and propane tank stoves:

  • White gas stoves: Strong but volatile. These will give you a lot of fuel without taking up too much pack space. Most white gas stoves are prohibited on airplanes and ferries.
  • Kerosene stoves: A type of liquid fuel stove. Hot burning but must be preheated before use.
  • Cartridge stoves: Very portable and easy to use. Simply attach your canister, turn the knob and light your burner. Less fuel capacity than other types of stoves but great for quick, solo backpacking trips.
  • Propane tank stoves: Typically has more burners, but the propane fuel can be quite bulky. These stoves work well for long, single location camps where there’s a vehicle nearby.
8c) Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination.

If you want some help with this, I’d recommend checking out my guide to the Cooking merit badge. In it, you’ll learn useful cooking techniques and discover a few example dishes that you can consider making yourself. Otherwise, you could also use your troop’s prior camp menus for inspiration!

I’d suggest asking your patrol what they want to eat so that everyone’s happy with your meal choices. My troop always cooked hamburgers or hot dogs after setting up on the first night, as those are some of the easiest, most inexpensive outdoor meals. If you’d like some more ideas, here is a great website of simple camping recipes.

Camp Food Safety

Food should always be stored in some sort of container so that it does not become contaminated or attract animals. Practice general food safety rules like not leaving meat out and keeping perishables on ice. Avoiding cross-contaminating meat and vegetables by cleaning knives between uses. When disposing of food, either place it in a tied-off trash bag or far away from camp so as not to attract wildlife.

8d) While camping in the outdoors, cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.

After preparing your camp menu, it’s time to start cooking! Work with your fellow patrol members to prepare a meal using a lightweight stove. I’d recommend checking out this Nonstick Pan + Mess Kit combo on Amazon. Being able to cook in your mess kit is a game-changer (and makes for fewer dishes to wash later on)!

Remember, you can check out the website I listed in requirement 8c for step-by-step recipes that could be completed on any campout. For more info on cooking, I’d also highly suggest checking out my complete guide to the Cooking merit badge. Good luck, I hope your dish tastes great! 🙂

Camping Merit Badge Requirement 9:

Show experience in camping by doing the following:
9a) Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

There’s no quick way to complete this requirement. However, scouts who attend most of their troop’s activities should be able to prettyeasily camp for a total of 20 days within their first year and a half of Scouting. Remember, this is the fun part. Just stick with it, and you’ll get there in no time!

9b) On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision:
I) Hike up a mountain, gaining at least 1,000 vertical feet.
II) Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles.
III) Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours.
IV) Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles.
V) Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.
VI) Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more.

I chose to do requirements I) and VI), but your troop may give you the opportunity to do any one of these activities! You probably won’t need to go out of your way to finish this one either, as most troops try to schedule activities so that their scouts are able to earn their Eagle-required badges. Any one of these will be a tiring but unforgettable adventure! 🙂

9c) Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. This can be done alone or with others.

This will most likely be completed as a troop community service project. If you’re not rushing to complete this badge, finishing up requirement 9 will seem more like a waiting game. Eventually, your troop will take you out to do these activities, or you’ll complete them during a longer seasonal camp. With that, you’ll be set to earn your camping merit badge!

Camping Merit Badge Requirement 10:

10) Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

This one is on you! Testing your limits and improvising while camping is a great way to build character and develop your skills. What did you learn? Take a second to ask yourself the following questions and think through your answers.

  • What were some of the things you did in earning this badge?
  • What were some of your favorite moments while camping?
  • How did you show scout spirit in overcoming the outdoor challenges you encountered?
  • What are some responsibilities that scouts have to the outdoors while camping?
  • Do you like camping any more now than when you started?

Once you’ve finished the other requirements, be sure to thoughtfully discuss each of these points with your counselor. A lot of learning comes from self-reflection, so by looking back on your camping experiences and recognizing everything you’ve accomplished, I’m sure you’ll gain a new appreciation for all the campouts you’ve been on. Great work! 🙂

Conclusion

Using the skills we’ve learned together in this guide, you’re now prepared to start camping like a true pro! Don’t be afraid to ask older scouts or adult leaders for advice, as there’s always more to be learned when camping. Get out there, stay safe, but also remember to have fun!

If you found this post helpful, I’ve also written guides to many of the other Eagle-required merit badges. I’d definitely recommend checking out my comprehensive difficulty rankings for every Eagle-required merit badge if you haven’t seen it already. 

I hope this guide has helped you to answer every requirement of your merit badge worksheet in your own words! I’m looking forward to having you back at ScoutSmarts soon because I’m constantly uploading new articles to support scouts like yourself. Until next time, best of luck on your Scouting journey!

(Click here to return to part 1 of my guide to the Camping merit badge!)

Sours: https://scoutsmarts.com/camping-merit-badge-answers/
Cub Camping CRC

Going camping with friends is one of the most unique and enjoyable parts of one’s Scouting experience. Earning the Eagle-required camping merit badge will equip you with the skills needed to lead your patrol in safely planning a successful multi-day campout. Are you prepared to take your next steps on the road towards becoming an Eagle scout? 

Having an understanding of useful camping techniques and practices will make for more enjoyable campouts in the future. This guide will walk you through each of the requirements and step-by-step solutions that you’ll need to know to complete your merit badge worksheet, learn how to camp the smart way, and earn your Camping merit badge! 🙂

Before we get started, if you have other Eagle-required merit badges to earn, I’d recommend checking out my Difficulty Ranking Guide to Every Eagle-required Badge. There, you’ll also find the links to my other merit badge guides, as well as a description and summary of each badge’s requirements. I’m certain this resource will be helpful to scouts on their road to Eagle!

Also, remember that ScoutSmarts should just serve as your starting point for merit badge research. In school, we’re taught not to plagiarize, and the same is true for Scouting worksheets. Answer these questions in your own words, do further research, and I promise you’ll gain much more from every merit badge you earn!

Before we dive into things, I need to warn you that camping comes with its own set of risks (which we’ll be learning about very soon). I’d highly recommend purchasing a reliable first aid kit to take along to all of your future camps. This Survival First Aid Kit on Amazon not only provides all of the medical equipment you’ll need, It can also save your life if you’re stranded in the wild!

Did you check it out? Awesome! Then it’s now time to start learning. Let’s begin by thoroughly reading through each of the Camping merit badge requirements!

What Are The Camping Merit Badge Requirements?

What we’ll be covering in this guide are the solutions to many of the knowledge requirements for this badge.Before we dive into the details, let’s discuss what you’ll need to do to earn the camping merit badge. You’ll be required to explain, demonstrate, and act out many skills related to camping which you’ll be learning in this guide.

The most dependable path to success is to know exactly what you need to do, beforehand. Planning is crucial! Take the time to read and fully understand the camping merit badge requirements outlined below:

  1. Do the following:
    a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in camping activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards
    b. Discuss with your counselor why it is important to be aware of weather conditions before and during your camping activities. Tell how you can prepare should the weather turn bad during your campouts.
    c. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation.
  2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal and group plan for implementing these principles on your next outing..
  3. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot by using a topographical map and one of the following:
    a. A compass
    b. A GPS receiver
    c. A smartphone with a GPS app
    (If a GPS-equipped device is not available, explain how to use one to get to your camping spot.)
  4. Do the following:
    a. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member.
    b. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.
  5. Do the following:
    a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term “layering.”
    b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet.
    c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding).
    d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed.
    e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.
  6. Do the following:
    a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent.
    b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water.
    c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent.
    d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.
  7. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following:
    a. Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed.
    b. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.
  8. Do the following:
    a. Explain the safety procedures for:

    I) Using a propane or butane/propane stove
    —II)Using a liquid fuel stove
    III) Proper storage of extra fuel
    b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves.
    c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination.
    d. While camping in the outdoors, cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.
  9. Show experience in camping by doing the following:
    a. Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events.* One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.
    b. On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision:
    —I) Hike up a mountain where, at some point, you are at least 1,000 feet higher in elevation from where you started.
    —II) Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles.
    —III) Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours.
    —IV) Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles.
    —V) Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.
    —VI) Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more.
    c) Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. This can be done alone or with others.
  10. Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Scout Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.
Do the following:
1a) Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in camping activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards

Use your Boy Scout Handbook to look for ideas and treatments of common hazards. Some of these hazards are outlined in requirement 1c, while other types of injuries could include broken bones, sprains, and burns. All first aid hazards are covered in the advancement requirements from Tenderfoot through First Class, with solutions appearing within your Boy Scout handbook.

The most typical hazards you’ll encounter while camping are:

  • Unexpectedly Cold Weather Conditions
  • Insect Bites/Stings
  • Dangerous Wild Animals
  • Excessive rain/Flooding
  • Heat-Related Injuries
  • Accidental Injury From Knives or Fire

Many of these issues can be prevented by being prepared in your packing and can be responded to by removing the affected person from the hazardous environment, then treating them accordingly. For more information on responding to medical emergencies, check out my full guide to the first aid merit badge.

1b) Discuss with your counselor why it is important to be aware of weather conditions before and during your camping activities. Tell how you can prepare should the weather turn bad during your campouts.

Weather and terrain are two important factors to consider when planning a campout. Although you should always be prepared in your packing, it is important to also be aware of potentially hazardous outdoor conditions and to respond accordingly. 

Weather conditions such as warnings of heavy rains, snowstorms, strong winds, or any sort of natural disaster will require you cancel your planned campout. These situations can be extremely dangerous and make it easy for scouts to be separated from the group. To reduce risk during any camp, stick with a buddy at all times.

Always have a plan to evacuate. If the weather should turn, be ready to store your belongings and ensure that everyone is accounted for. In the event of heavy storms or natural disasters, be sure to have access to a scout leader with a phone so that emergency services can be contacted if necessary. When in doubt, don’t go out.

1c) Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation.

In the case of all of these injuries and illnesses, a good general rule of thumb will be to separate the person from the hazard and bring them to shelter. When they’re no longer at risk of further injury, assess them for any life-threatening conditions while they rest. Make sure they’re hydrated and be on the lookout for any signs of shock.

Hypothermia

Hypothermia is caused by one’s core body temperature falling below 95°F. While symptoms of mild hypothermia include shivering and confusion, in more dangerous cases the victim will not have enough energy to continue shivering and may fall unconscious.

If you notice someone is experiencing hypothermia, immediately warm them using extra clothing, fire, or through body heat. Do not suddenly re-warm the victim by placing them in a hot shower, as this could lead to rewarming shock.

Frostbite

Frostbite occurs when extremities, such as fingers and toes, begin to freeze. Skin in the affected areas will turn blue, then white. If you notice frostbite setting in, evacuate to a warm area. To avoid frostbite, wear gloves, socks, and hats in cold weather while camping. Avoid prolonged exposure to below-freezing temperatures.

Try not to wrap the frostbitten area, as this could cause some of the tissue to be killed off. A better way to warm the frostbitten area is by running it under cool water, then, slowly increasing the water temperature as the injury defrosts. If you’re frostbitten while camping, use the heating within a car to warm yourself; seek medical attention.

Heat Reactions

There are 3 main types of heat reactions:

  • Heatstroke: Heatstroke occurs when one’s body temperature exceeds 104°F. If untreated, heatstroke can lead to seizures, confusion, loss of consciousness and even a coma.
  • Heat Exhaustion: Heat exhaustion can be caused by either water or sodium depletion. Symptoms include thirst, headache, dizziness, vomiting, a feeling of weakness, and loss of consciousness.
  • Heat Cramps: Heat cramps are sudden muscle spasms that occur when the body has insufficient salt or water. These are minor, and will typically subside within half an hour once the victim is hydrated.

In the case of heatstroke, contact emergency medical services by calling 911. To treat other types of heat reactions, rest the victim in a cool, shady place and have them drink lots of fluids with sodium and electrolytes. To prevent heat reactions, stay hydrated, wear sun protection and refrain from strenuous activity during the warmest time of day.

Dehydration

Dehydration occurs when the body does not consume enough water. Some symptoms of dehydration include a flushed face, lack of sweat, or feeling of weakness. This is a potentially fatal condition that can result in lowered blood pressure, dizziness, and fainting. To treat dehydration, encourage the victim to rest and replenish their body with water and electrolytes. Hydrate the victim slowly, avoiding drastic rehydration.

When camping, water will likely be harder to come by, and you may not be able to hydrate as often. Therefore, you’ll need to focus extra hard on drinking enough water. Experts recommend you drink at least 1 liter of water every 2 hours to avoid dehydration. That means constant, easy hydration is key!

Altitude Sickness

Altitude sickness occurs when a person moves to a higher elevation too quickly. At heights exceeding 8000 feet above sea level, the air will contain significantly less oxygen, putting you at risk for altitude sickness. To treat altitude sickness, descend to a lower elevation immediately (ideally below 4000 feet).

Common symptoms of altitude sickness include nausea, headaches, dizziness, a loss of appetite, and feelings of weakness. To avoid getting altitude sickness, climb to higher altitudes slowly (this is called acclimatization). Sleeping at the lowest elevation possible also reduces your risk of altitude sickness.

Insect Stings

In most cases, insect stings are not dangerous and only result in minor swelling and itching. If stung, remove any stingers left in the area. To treat a sting, wash with soap and water, then apply a cold compress. Taking an antihistamine may also reduce later itching.

In individuals with allergies, certain insect stings can result in a fatal reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic reactions cause immediate and severe swelling in the neck and face, as well as difficulty breathing, and can prove fatal if left untreated.

Most people with severe allergies carry an EpiPen. When used by removing the safety cap and pressing the needle into the victim’s thigh, an EpiPen can counteract an anaphylactic reaction. However, the effect of an EpiPen is temporary and the person must still quickly receive medical attention.

Tick Bites

Ticks can be commonly found in fields or forests in some regions, and are small parasites that burrow into your skin. If you find a tick on your body when camping, immediately remove it. Using a pair of fine-tipped tweezers, grasp the tick as close to your skin’s surface as possible. Then, gently pull the tick straight out. Be sure not to twist the tweezers to avoid having parts of the tick break off under your skin.

Gently wash the affected area with warm water and soap, applying alcohol to the wound to prevent infection. Save the tick in a container of rubbing alcohol. Several weeks following removal, if you develop a rash or fever, immediately visit a doctor and show them the tick that you saved.

Snakebite

Luckily, only about 20% of snakes are venomous.  However, if you’re bitten by a snake, you should immediately call 911 and describe the situation and snake. If there is burning pain at the site of the wound, call an ambulance ASAP. Most emergency rooms and ambulances have anti-venom drugs which could prove life-saving. 

Keep the bite below the level of your heart and try to remain calm. If possible, try to identify the shape of the snake’s head. Venomous snakes typically have triangular heads and slit-like eyes. To avoid being bitten by a snake, watch your step in tall grass, keep your tent closed with your belongings secured, and never provoke the wildlife

Blisters

Blisters typically come from the friction of material rubbing against the skin, which can be caused by poor-fitting shoes or other clothing. Camping in wet clothing can also cause blisters. Blisters appear as bubbles under the top layer of skin. They can be filled with pus, water, or even blood, and could be quite painful.

If you find you’re developing a blister, or notice an area that is rubbing uncomfortably, apply a moleskin to the irritated patch of skin. Blisters are naturally reabsorbed by the body, so by preventing rubbing the blister will heal and go away on its own.

Avoid popping blisters unless they’re so large that you can’t get around otherwise. You can puncture a blister with a sterile needle. Popped blisters risk infection, so thoroughly disinfect and bandage the area immediately afterward. Remove the bandage at night to let the popped blister dry.

Hyperventilation

Hyperventilation is caused by breathing too quickly which depletes one’s body of carbon dioxide. Also called over-breathing, hyperventilation can lead to feelings of lightheadedness, a tingling sensation in one’s extremities, and may even cause the victim to faint. If you notice someone is hyperventilating, have them relax and take deep breaths.

Hyperventilation can result from a variety of situations such as anxiety, severe pain, heavy physical exertion, panic attacks, or infections in the lungs. To treat hyperventilation, have the victim breathe slowly, either through pursed lips or into a paper bag. Bouts of hyperventilation should last no longer than 30 minutes, so seek medical attention if the victim still hasn’t recovered by this time.

2) Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal plan for implementing these principles on your next outing.

There are 7 Leave No Trace principles:

  1. Plan ahead and prepare. 
  2. Travel and camp on durable surfaces. 
  3. Dispose of waste properly. 
  4. Leave what you find.
  5. Minimize campfire impacts.
  6. Respect wildlife. 
  7. Be considerate of other visitors.

The Outdoor Code states: 

As an American, I will do my best to –

Be clean in my outdoor manners.

Be careful with fire.

Be considerate in the outdoors.

Be conservation minded.

Together, the Leave No Trace principles and Outdoor Code make up the rules that all scouts should live by whenever out in nature. As a scout, it’s your responsibility to leave the outdoors better than how you’ve found it. By following these guidelines, you can help to keep camping safe and enjoyable for all!

To implement these principles on your next outing, you should plan some general guidelines that every person in your patrol can agree upon before heading to the campsite. While camping, be mindful of where you are setting up your fires, pitching your tents, and disposing of waste. Before leaving, always scan the area for any loose trash. Look for ways that you can leave the site nicer than it was before you arrived.

3. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot by using a topographical map and one of the following:
a) A compass
b) A GPS receiver
c) A smartphone with a GPS app
(If a GPS-equipped device is not available, explain how to use one to get to your camping spot.)

Since each location differs, it would be a good idea to speak to your merit badge counselor about this one. They can ensure that you are able to properly use your compass, and point you in the right direction as far as camping areas go. You can use (https://www.topoquest.com/) to find and print a topographical map of the area. 

While you’re able to navigate to your camping spot using a compass, GPS receiver, or smartphone, I would recommend you use a compass to complete this requirement. Navigation is an important skill that very few people are capable of today without the use of their smartphones. Once you have your map and compass ready, it’s time to write a trek plan.

In your plan, it is important to assess the distance, terrain and weather conditions of your trek. Be sure to note all of these factors beforehand, as well as your estimated duration of the trip. This, as well as a few brief paragraphs of your plans and expectations for the camp should suffice.

4. Do the following:
a) Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member.
b) Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.

These requirements can both be easily done within your own troop. Take this opportunity to speak with a troop leader and familiarize yourself with how your troop tends to handle their duty roster. On your next campout, ask your patrol leader for help completing this requirement.

This time, you’ll be in charge! After your patrol has met to plan the next campout, note down each of your patrol members’ duties. That’s your duty roster. Make sure to pack it in your bag, because you’ll be referencing it during your upcoming campout.

During the troop meeting right before your campout, you should also be able to complete requirement 4b) by helping plan the menu, evaluating your patrol equipment needs, and helping everyone get organized. After you’ve arrived at the camp, you can finally assist in helping set up!

Congrats on Finishing Part 1 of the Camping Merit Badge!

Click Here For Part 2 Of My Guide To The Camping Merit Badge

Great work making it this far :). You definitely deserve a break at this point; give yourself a huge pat on the back!

As of 2021, I’ve made some updates and improvements to the second half of my Camping merit badge guide. This new version has a lot more resources and helpful explanations so that you can understand the concepts even better!

Once you’re ready to continue on to part 2 of the Camping merit badge (Requirements 5-10) click here.

5. Do the following:
a) Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term “layering.”

The clothing needed for overnight campouts can vary based on your location. In warm environments, you should pack sun exposure protection, rain gear, suitable footwear, as well as extra socks and underwear. Personally, I always bring a wide-brimmed hat, a light jacket, a rain jacket, and warm socks whenever camping.

In cold environments, layering means wearing multiple articles of clothing over each other so that you can achieve the right level of warmth. For example, wearing a t-shirt, light jacket, hoodie, and waterproof snow jacket would be considered layering.

Layering can help you keep warm because your body will heat the inner layers, and you’ll be insulated from the cold by the outside layers. You can even remove or add clothing if you begin to overheat or get too cold.

5b) Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet.

Determine if your trek will take place in a wet or dry environment. In a wet environment, slow-drying shoes can mean an increased chance of blisters and feet infections. You’ll need to pack shoes that can be dried on the go and are resistant to moisture damage. Be sure that your feet are also well-supported if you will be walking long distances, and remember to bring a change of footwear.

In cold, damp environments, you’ll want to pack insulated, warm, waterproof shoes that will stand up to the outdoor conditions. Failing to choose the right footwear to protect your feet is one of the biggest mistakes that inexperienced campers make. If you’re looking for scouting footwear, check out mycomplete guide to choosing the right footwear for any type of Scouting trek.

5c) Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding).

Keeping equipment properly cared for after every camp out will prolong its usability and save you money in the long run. This means emptying, cleaning, washing, and drying your gear following each campout. Properly cared for camping equipment should be stored dry and out of direct sunlight, in an area free of pests.

Quick tips when caring for camping gear:

  • Funky odors are caused by bacteria. You can reduce the smell and kill the bacteria by washing your equipment and then leaving it in direct sunlight to dry (not for thin/sensitive gear)!
  • Always shake out bedding and sleeping mats to remove any twigs, bugs or debris. These could damage your equipment while in storage.
  • If your clothes really smell, you can place them in a bucket filled with a 1/2 cup of baking soda and water overnight. This will eliminate smells like smoke or sweat!
5d) List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed.

Outdoor essentials can vary based on the nature of your camping environment. Once you’ve been camping for some time, you’ll have a better sense of what equipment you commonly use and what to bring. At a minimum, you should carry water, a first-aid kit, and gear to create an overnight shelter.

I don’t want this article to be too long, as you likely already have a good idea of what gear you frequently take along to campouts. However, for a complete checklist of the most common essentials you might need for different types of outings, check out my article on a Scout’s Essential Camp Gear Packing List!

5e) Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.

If you’ve read each of the previous sections, you should have a good idea of how to properly prepare for an overnight campout. Pack your bag according to the the above checklist, look sharp wearing your class-A uniform, and get ready for an amazing camping trip! You’re ready.

6. Do the following:
a) Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent.

Four types of tents which can be characterized by their unique shapes are A-Frame tents, Pyramid tents, Hoop tents , and Dome tents

A-frame tent Scout

.

  • A-Frame tents: A-Frame tents take on a triangular shape and are supported by a pole on each end. These tents tend not to be very spacious, given their ground surface area.
Scout Dome tent
  • Dome tents: The most common type of tent, dome tents are usually made with poles which criss-cross over its middle. These tents are very strong and spacious.
Scout Hoop tent
  • Hoop tents: Hoop tents can be very spacious and are made by stretching fabric over parallel hoops. These tents are often longer than other types of tents.
Scout Pyramid Tent
  • Pyramid tents: Pyramid tents are supported by a single central pole with the tent fabric being pulled out and pegged on each of its sides.

Tents should be pitched away from places where water may pool, in areas clear of roots and sharp sticks. After a camp, tents should be cleaned and stored in a dry environment until their next use.

6b) Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water.

A scout is clean. Camp sanitation is important in preventing foodborne illnesses and insect infestations. Unsanitary camp conditions can lead to consuming spoiled food which may result in indigestion, food poisoning or diarrhea. There is also a high risk of illness when drinking untreated water.

To make water suitable for human consumption, three methods of purification are typically used:

  • Boiling
  • Iodine droplets
  • Filtration

Demonstrating two of these methods will be very straightforward. Simply find some clear fresh water and boil it. Then, depending on your equipment, you can either drop an iodine tablet into unclean but clear water or run it through a water filter. Boiling and iodine tablets will not remove the heavy sediment in your water, so always use a water filter, if possible.

6c) Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent.

Tents should be pitched over debris-free areas on a slight incline. In the event of heavy rains, the water will flow away from the tent rather than pooling where you sleep. Also, avoid pitching your tent in a meadow area, and instead, place it on short grass or insensitive ground. Avoid branches, as these may puncture the floor of your tent.

For your own safety, always pitch your tent with a side wall facing into the wind. Never face your tent opening into the wind, otherwise, your tent might be blown away! In heavy winds, be especially careful of camping under trees, as their falling branches could be hazardous.

6d) Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Both internal and external frame backpacks come with a metal frame to support your back while hiking. However, an internal frame pack has the frame built into the backpack and is more form-fitting. On the other hand, an external frame packhas a metal frame on the outside of the bag which can be used for attaching gear or distributing weight.

External-frame packs tend to leave a space between the bag and your body which provides a cooling airflow. These bags pull your center of gravity backward and are good for hiking groomed trails where you often need to redistribute weight among different parts of your back. However, external-frame packs are bulky and can snag easily. Therefore, these bags may not be ideal for difficult trails.

Internal-frame packs have recently become more popular, as they sit closer to your back and have less risk of snagging. These bags push your center of gravity forward, which helps with your stability but may feel uncomfortable during flat, easy hikes. Internal-frame packs are also typically more expensive than external-frame but are more suitable for maneuvering challenging trails.

6e) Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.

There are many different types of sleeping bag styles such as the rectangular sleeping bag, barrel-shaped sleeping bag, and mummy sleeping bag. However, these bag-type differences are usually not important. The features of these sleeping bags can differ by brand, so the main things to look out for are the bag material, temperature rating, and care instructions.

However, the most important thing to consider when purchasing a sleeping bag is the temperature that you’ll be using it in. Each sleeping bag comes with a temperature rating at which it will be most effectively used. Assess the conditions in which you’ll be camping, and pick a lightweight bag most suitable to your needs.

Sleeping bags should be cleaned often and stored dry. Avoid using your sleeping bag on uncovered ground as it may get damaged. A good sleeping bag can easily last you your entire scouting career.

7. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following:
a) Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed.
b) Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness. 

Here’s an example checklist of camping gear, but I’d encourage you to create your own based on your past experience.

Before packing, take the time to think through what you’ll be doing on the campout.

First, you’ll hike in, you’ll pitch your tent, then you’ll make dinner. After that, you’ll get changed, and finally you might have some free time. Therefore, you should have water near the top of your bag, then your tent supplies, then cooking supplies, a change of clothes, and finally whatever you’ll need during your free time stored at the bottom of your pack.

8. Do the following:
a) Explain the safety procedures for:

I) Using a propane or butane/propane stove

There are always some risks when using an open flame, so be sure to set up your stove away from anything that may catch fire. Propane stoves should always be used in open-air with exposure to oxygen. Never leave your stove unattended while on. After use, be sure to clean the stove and disconnect your canister.

These stoves need to be connected to a propane canister, so always check if the connections are fully tightened. This can be done by applying soapy water to the areas where the canister is fastened. Small bubbles should form if the canister is not securely sealed. If the seals are not fully connected, you should also smell the propane (a rotten egg-like scent).

II) Using a liquid fuel stove

Liquid fuel stoves are very similar to propane stoves and should be cared for in the same manner. However, these can be a little bit harder to use, as they need to be primed before lighting. To prime a liquid fuel stove, open the canister to release a little bit of fuel into the burner. Then, close the canister and light the burner. Once lit for a few minutes, slowly reopen the fuel cannister.

Liquid fuel stoves may be more difficult to use, but perform better than propane stoves in cold weather, and can also be refilled.

III) Proper storage of extra fuel

I shouldn’t need to say this, but fuel is extremely flammable! Do not leave your fuel anywhere near a campfire. Make sure to regularly check for leaks, and monitor the level of your remaining fuel. Refill tanks when necessary. Doing so will ensure that you have ample fuel for the next camp out.

8b) Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves.

A few different types of cooking stoves are white gas stoves, kerosene stoves, cartridge stoves, and propane tank stoves:

  • White gas stoves: Strong but volatile. These stoves are often prohibited on airplanes and ferries.
  • Kerosene stoves: Hot burning but must be preheated before use.
  • Cartridge stoves: Very portable and easy to use. Simply attach your canister, turn the knob and light your burner. Less fuel capacity than other types of stoves.
  • Propane tank stoves: Typically has more burners and a higher fuel capacity, but can be quite bulky. These stoves work well for long, single location camps.
8c) Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination.

You might want to use your troop’s prior camp menus for inspiration. Ask your patrol what they want to eat so that everyone’s happy with your meal choices. My troop always cooked hamburgers or hot dogs after setting up on the first night, as those are some of the easiest, most inexpensive outdoor meals. If you need some inspiration, here is a website of camping recipes.

Food should always be stored in some sort of container so that it does not become contaminated or attract animals. Practice general food safety rules like not leaving meat out and keeping perishables on ice. Avoiding cross-contaminating meat and vegetables by cleaning knives between uses. When disposing of food, either place it in a tied-off trash bag or far away from camp so as not to attract wildlife.

8d) While camping in the outdoors, cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.

After preparing your camp menu, it’s time to start cooking! Work with your fellow patrol members to prepare a meal using a lightweight stove. I’d recommend checking out this affordable Nonstick Pan + Mess Kit combo on Amazon. Being able to cook in your mess kit is a gamechanger!

Remember, you can check out the website I listed in requirement 8c for step-by-step recipes that could be completed on any campout. For more info on cooking, I’d also highly suggest checking out my complete guide to the Cooking merit badge. Good luck, I hope your dish tastes great! 🙂

9. Show experience in camping by doing the following:
(a) Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

There’s no quick way to complete this requirement. However, scouts who attend most of their troop’s activities should be able to prettyeasily camp for a total of 20 days within their first year and a half of Scouting. Just stick with it, and you’ll get there in no time!

9b) On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision:
I) Hike up a mountain, gaining at least 1,000 vertical feet.
II) Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles.
III) Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours.
IV) Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles.
V) Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.
VI) Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more.

I completed requirements I) and VI), but your troop may give you the opportunity to do any one of these activities. You probably won’t need to go out of your way to finish this either, as troops generally try to help out scouts in earning their Eagle-required badges.

9c) Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. This can be done alone or with others.

This will be a troop community service project. If you’re not rushing to complete this badge, all of requirement nine can be more of a waiting game. Eventually, your troop will take you out to do these activities, or you’ll complete them during a longer seasonal camp. With that, you’ll be set to earn your camping merit badge!

10. Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

This one is on you! What were some of the things you did in earning this badge? What have been some of your favorite moments while camping? How did you show scout spirit in overcoming the outdoor challenges you encountered? Do you like camping any more now than when you started? Discuss these points with your counselor once you’ve finished the other requirements.

Conclusion

Using the skills we’ve covered, you’re now able to start camping like a true pro! Don’t be afraid to ask older scouts or adult leaders for advice, as there’s always more to be learned when camping. Get out there, stay safe, but also remember to have fun!

The Camping merit badge is a great way to build confidence in the outdoors and is essential on your path to becoming an Eagle Scout. I hope you’ve found my guide helpful, and encourage you to check out some of my other complete guides here. Share this article with your fellow scouts, and use it as a reference if you ever need a refresher on the camping merit badge.

I hope this guide has helped you gain a bit of ScoutSmarts, and I wish you the best of luck in your Scouting journey! 🙂

Sours: https://scoutsmarts.com/camping-merit-badge-guide/

Badge camping workbook merit

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Scout Camping Requirements: How Many Nights Out?

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