Calories chicken breast oz

Calories chicken breast oz DEFAULT

Your Go-To Guide to Chicken Nutrition

Chicken is an affordable source of lean protein that can be prepped in countless ways.

Image Credit: VeselovaElena/iStock/GettyImages

Chicken offers a rich source of nutrients, vitamins and minerals. The poultry — especially white meat — is lower in both total fat and saturated fat than red meat, but with a similar protein content.

Chicken is a tasty, versatile and healthy alternative to red meat.

Chicken Breast Nutrition

The breast is the leanest cut of the chicken, and it contains the least amount of sodium and cholesterol.

Here's the breakdown of chicken breast nutrition per 1 oz. cooked, according to the USDA:

  • 45 calories
  • 0.9 g fat
  • 32.9 mg cholesterol
  • 13.3 mg sodium
  • 0 g carbs
  • 9.1 g protein
  • 17% Daily Value (DV) vitamin B3
  • 15% DV vitamin B6
  • 9% DV vitamin B5

There are 9.1 grams of protein in chicken breast per ounce. If you're eating one chicken breast (about 3 oz. of chicken), you'll get 134 calories and about 27 grams of protein for only 2.8 grams of total fat.

Chicken Fillet Nutritional Information

In 2003, chicken became more popular than beef in the United States for the first time in a century, with the average American consuming 60 pounds annually. According to a market research study conducted at Oklahoma State University, the majority of this chicken is consumed in the form of boneless, skinless chicken breasts, often sold under the name chicken fillets.

One 4-ounce grilled chicken fillet contains:

  • 164 calories
  • 5.9 g fat
  • 77.1 mg cholesterol
  • 496.7 mg sodium
  • 2.7 g carbs
  • 25.2 g protein
  • 52% DV vitamin B3
  • 13% DV vitamin B6
  • 14% DV vitamin B2

Breaded Chicken Cutlet Calories and Nutrition

Chicken cutlets are a culinary blank canvas — you can cover them in sauce or breading or grill the cutlets and serve them on a sandwich. Chicken cutlets can also be suitable for a variety of diet plans, as they are low in fat and calories.

One 4-ounce breaded chicken cutlet contains the following, according to the USDA:

  • 201 calories
  • 5 g fat
  • 90.7 mg cholesterol
  • 612.4 mg sodium
  • 4 g carbs
  • 32.1 g protein

About 68 percent of the calories in a breaded chicken cutlet comes from protein, 24 percent come from fat and the remainder from carbs. Consuming protein is vital for your health because it helps build and repair your body's cells and tissues.

What Is a Chicken Cutlet?

Chicken cutlets are thin strips of meat from chicken breasts that can be used in a variety of recipes.

Rotisserie Chicken Nutrition (Without Skin)

Many people find it difficult to cook healthy meals for themselves on a regular basis. If you find yourself pressed for time, eating precooked rotisserie chicken can be a healthy alternative to many of the available fast food options.

A 4-ounce serving of rotisserie chicken breast contains:

  • 146 calories
  • 3.3 g fat
  • 80.5 mg cholesterol
  • 254 mg sodium
  • 0 g carbs
  • 28 g protein

Dark Meat vs. White Meat Chicken Nutrition

When it comes to light meat or dark meat, everyone has a taste preference. But if your first choice is the drumstick or the wing, you'll get more total fat and saturated fat. Knowing the nutritional differences between the two types of poultry might help you determine how they fit your diet plan.

See how chicken breast (white meat) compares to the chicken thigh (dark meat) below. Values are per a 4-ounce cooked portion. About 58 percent of the calories in dark meat chicken come from protein (the rest from fat) while 79 percent of the calories in white meat chicken come from protein.

Dark Meat

White Meat

Calories

263

187

Total Fat

16.7 g

4 g

Saturated Fat

4.7 g

1.1 g

Cholesterol

150.8 mg

96.4 mg

Carbs

0 g

0

Protein

26.4 g

35.2

Vitamin B3

41% DV

97% DV

Vitamin B5

28% DV

22% DV

Zinc

18% DV

10% DV

Iron

7% DV

7% DV

Sours: https://www.livestrong.com/article/534015-nutrition-in-a-chicken-cutlet/

How Many Calories in Chicken? Breast, Thigh, Wing and More

Chicken is a popular option when it comes to lean protein, as it packs a considerable amount into a single serving without a lot of fat.

Plus, it’s easy to cook at home and available in most restaurants. Chicken dishes can be found on just about any menu, no matter what type of cuisine you’re eating.

But you may wonder exactly how many calories are in that chicken on your plate.

Chicken comes in many cuts, including breasts, thighs, wings and drumsticks. Each cut contains a different number of calories and a different proportion of protein to fat.

Here are the calorie counts for the most popular cuts of chicken.

Chicken Breast: 284 Calories

Chicken breast is one of the most popular cuts of chicken. It’s high in protein and low in fat, making it an excellent choice for people trying to lose weight.

One skinless, boneless, cooked chicken breast (172 grams) has the following nutrition breakdown (1):

  • Calories: 284
  • Protein: 53.4 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 6.2 grams

A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of chicken breast provides 165 calories, 31 grams of protein and 3.6 grams of fat (1).

That means that approximately 80% of the calories in chicken breast come from protein, and 20% come from fat.

Keep in mind that these amounts refer to a plain chicken breast with no added ingredients. Once you start cooking it in oil or adding marinades or sauces, you increase the total calories, carbs and fat.

Summary

Chicken breast is a low-fat source of protein that contains zero carbs. One chicken breast has 284 calories, or 165 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams). About 80% of the calories come from protein while 20% come from fat.

Chicken Thigh: 109 Calories

Chicken thigh is slightly more tender and flavorful than chicken breast due to its higher fat content.

One skinless, boneless, cooked chicken thigh (52 grams) contains (2):

  • Calories: 109
  • Protein: 13.5 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 5.7 grams

A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of chicken thigh provides 209 calories, 26 grams of protein and 10.9 grams of fat (2).

Thus, 53% of the calories come from protein, while 47% come from fat.

Chicken thighs are often cheaper than chicken breasts, making them a good choice for anyone on a budget.

Summary

One chicken thigh contains 109 calories, or 209 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams). It’s 53% protein and 47% fat.

Chicken Wing: 43 Calories

When you think about healthy cuts of chicken, chicken wings probably don’t come to mind.

However, as long as they’re not covered in breading or sauce and deep-fried, they can easily fit into a healthy diet.

One skinless, boneless chicken wing (21 grams) contains (3):

  • Calories: 42.6
  • Protein: 6.4 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 1.7 grams

Per 3.5 ounces (100 grams), chicken wings provide 203 calories, 30.5 grams of protein and 8.1 grams of fat (3).

This means that 64% of the calories come from protein and 36% from fat.

Summary

One chicken wing has 43 calories, or 203 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams). It’s 64% protein and 36% fat.

Chicken Drumstick: 76 Calories

Chicken legs are made up of two parts — the thigh and the drumstick. The drumstick is the lower portion of the leg.

One skinless, boneless chicken drumstick (44 grams) contains (4):

  • Calories: 76
  • Protein: 12.4 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Fat: 2.5 grams

Per 3.5 ounces (100 grams), chicken drumsticks have 172 calories, 28.3 grams of protein and 5.7 grams of fat (4).

When it comes to calorie count, about 70% come from protein while 30% come from fat.

Summary

One chicken drumstick has 76 calories, or 172 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams). It’s 70% protein and 30% fat.

Other Cuts of Chicken

Though breast, thighs, wings and drumsticks are the most popular cuts of chicken, there are several others to choose from.

Here are the calories in some other cuts of chicken (5, 6, 7, 8):

  • Chicken tenders: 263 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams)
  • Back: 137 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams)
  • Dark meat: 125 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams)
  • Light meat: 114 calories per 3.5 ounces (100 grams)
Summary

The number of calories in various cuts of chicken varies. Light meat has the lowest number of calories while chicken tenders have the highest.

Chicken Skin Adds Calories

While a skinless chicken breast is 284 calories with 80% protein and 20% fat, those numbers dramatically shift when you include the skin (1).

One boneless, cooked chicken breast with skin (196 grams) contains (9):

  • Calories: 386
  • Protein: 58.4 grams
  • Fat: 15.2 grams

In a chicken breast with skin, 50% of the calories come from protein, while 50% come from fat. Additionally, eating the skin adds nearly 100 calories (9).

Similarly, one chicken wing with skin (34 grams) has 99 calories, compared to 42 calories in a skinless wing (21 grams). Thus, 60% of the calories in chicken wings with skin come from fat, compared to 36% in a wing without skin (3, 10).

So if you’re watching your weight or your fat intake, eat your chicken without the skin to minimize calories and fat.

Summary

Eating chicken with the skin adds a significant amount of calories and fat. Take the skin off before eating to reduce calories.

How You Cook Your Chicken Matters

Chicken meat alone is relatively low in calories and fat compared to other meats. But once you start adding oil, sauce, batter and breading, the calories can add up.

For example, a skinless, boneless, cooked chicken thigh (52 grams) contains 109 calories and 5.7 grams of fat (2).

But that same chicken thigh fried in batter packs 144 calories and 8.6 grams of fat. A chicken thigh fried in a flour coating contains even more — 162 calories and 9.3 grams of fat (11, 12).

Similarly, one boneless, skinless chicken wing (21 grams) has 43 calories and 1.7 grams of fat (3).

However, a chicken wing glazed in barbecue sauce provides 61 calories and 3.7 grams of fat. That’s comparable to a wing fried in a flour coating, which has 61 calories and 4.2 grams of fat (13, 14).

Therefore, cooking methods that add little fat, such as poaching, roasting, grilling and steaming, are your best bet for keeping the calorie count low.

Summary

Cooking methods, such as frying in breading and coating the meat in sauce, can add more than a few calories to your healthy chicken. For a low-calorie option, stick with baked or grilled chicken.

The Bottom Line

Chicken is a popular meat, and most cuts are low in calories and fat while providing ample protein.

Here are the calorie counts of the most common cuts of boneless, skinless chicken per 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving:

  • Chicken breast: 165 calories
  • Chicken thigh: 209 calories
  • Chicken wing: 203 calories
  • Chicken drumstick: 172 calories

Note that eating the skin or using unhealthy cooking methods adds calories.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/calories-in-chicken
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Chicken Breast

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size1 oz of boneless (yield after cooking)

Amount Per Serving

Calories

35

 

% Daily Values*

Total Fat

1.39g

2%

Saturated Fat

0.391g

2%

Trans Fat

-

Polyunsaturated Fat

0.296g

Monounsaturated Fat

0.541g

Cholesterol

15mg

5%

Sodium

71mg

3%

Total Carbohydrate

0g

0%

Dietary Fiber

0g

0%

Sugars

0g

Protein

5.32g

Vitamin D

-

Calcium

3mg

0%

Iron

0.19mg

1%

Potassium

44mg

1%

Vitamin A

5mcg

1%

Vitamin C

0mg

0%

2%

of RDI*

(35 calories)

2% of RDI

Calorie Breakdown:

 

Carbohydrate (0%)

 

Fat (37%)

 

Protein (63%)

Photos

Nutrition summary:

Calories

35

Fat

1.39g

Carbs

0g

Protein

5.32g

There are 35 calories in 1 ounce of boneless Chicken Breast.
Calorie breakdown: 37% fat, 0% carbs, 63% protein.

Other Common Serving Sizes:

Related Types of Chicken Breast:

Related Types of Chicken:

See Also:

Sours: https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/generic/chicken-breast-ns-as-to-skin-eaten?portionid=5041&portionamount=1.000
🐔Protein in an 8 oz Chicken Breast

Chicken Breast Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Chicken breast is a great source of lean protein (protein without a lot of accompanying fat). People who eat enough protein are more likely to maintain muscle mass and preserve a healthy metabolism. Since chicken breasts are versatile and relatively inexpensive, they are a useful food to include in a balanced, healthy eating plan.

Chicken Breast Nutrition Facts

The following nutrition information is provided by the USDA for one 3-ounce (85g) serving of boneless, skinless grilled chicken breast. Note that many commercially packaged chicken breasts are much larger than 3 ounces. So if you eat a single breast, you’re probably eating more than a single serving.

  • Calories:128
  • Fat:2.7g
  • Sodium:44mg
  • Carbohydrates:0g
  • Fiber:0g
  • Sugars:0g
  • Protein:26g

Carbs

Chicken breasts contain no sugar or starch (unless they are prepared with breading or seasonings), so they have no carbohydrates. The estimated glycemic load of chicken breast is zero.

Fats

Skinless chicken breast contains a small amount of fat, less than 3 grams. It is mostly unsaturated fat (there is less than 1 gram of saturated fat in a 3-ounce portion of skinless chicken breast).

If you keep the skin on your chicken breast, the fat, calorie, and protein counts will all be higher. A 3-ounce (85g) serving of roasted, broiled, or baked chicken breast with skin on provides 166 calories, 6.6 grams fat, and 25 grams protein.

Protein

Chicken breasts are a good source of lean protein. For people who eat meat, consuming chicken is a simple way to meet some of your body's protein needs without also consuming a lot of fat. Depending on the cooking method you choose, chicken breasts are also naturally low in sodium.

Vitamins and Minerals

Chicken breast is a very good source of selenium, phosphorus, vitamin B6, and niacin.

Health Benefits

The low-fat protein found in chicken breast can offer many important advantages, making this food a helpful addition to many eating plans.

Builds and Maintains Muscle Mass

Protein helps your body maintain muscle mass and also helps build muscle in conjunction with a strength training program. Research, such as this 2016 review study, shows that losses in muscle mass and strength are directly associated with mortality rates in older people.

Strengthens Bones

Scientists and doctors once believed that a diet high in animal protein could reduce bone density and increase the risk of broken bones. However, more recent research shows that protein works with calcium to help protect bones. It's important to consume enough protein to keep bones strong and healthy.

Reduces Appetite

Consuming protein helps you feel full, which can help reduce food cravings and prevent overeating. One small study of overweight men on reduced-calorie diets, for example, found that those who ate more protein showed "improved appetite control and satiety."

Allergies

Poultry allergies are rare but are certainly possible. Doctors suggest that allergy to poultry is about as common as allergy to red meat (but being allergic to one kind of meat does not mean you will be allergic to other meats). Sometimes people with egg allergy have a secondary allergy to poultry. In this kind of allergy, reactions usually happen when coming into contact with raw meat, not consuming cooked meat.

Adverse Effects

People with kidney disease need to be cautious about consuming too much protein, especially in large portions. If you have kidney disease, talk to your doctor about the best protein sources and amounts for you.

Since it is an animal protein, chicken breast is not suitable for people on a plant-based (vegetarian or vegan) diet.

Varieties

You can purchase chicken breasts that are pre-trimmed and ready to use. In many grocery stores and bulk warehouses, you might also find chicken breasts that are frozen and individually wrapped. If you buy one of these convenient options, be sure to check the nutrition facts label. These varieties of chicken breast may contain more sodium.

You may also see various labels on chicken marketing it as organic, antibiotic-free, and so on. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates these terms:

  • Free range: "Producers must demonstrate to the Agency that the poultry has been allowed access to the outside."
  • Natural: "A product containing no artificial ingredient or added color and is only minimally processed. Minimal processing means that the product was processed in a manner that does not fundamentally alter the product. The label must include a statement explaining the meaning of the term natural (such as "no artificial ingredients; minimally processed")."
  • No hormones: "Hormones are not allowed in raising hogs or poultry. Therefore, the claim 'no hormones added' cannot be used on the labels of pork or poultry unless it is followed by a statement that says "Federal regulations prohibit the use of hormones."
  • No antibiotics: "The terms 'no antibiotics added; may be used on labels for meat or poultry products if sufficient documentation is provided by the producer to the Agency demonstrating that the animals were raised without antibiotics."
  • Organic: There are specific rules about how chickens must be raised and cared for in order to be labeled organic. For example, they must be given 100% organic feed.

Storage and Food Safety

Raw chicken can harbor bacteria, such as Campylobacter and Salmonella, that can cause illness. Cooking chicken to at least 165 degrees F will kill the bacteria, but safe handling of the raw meat during preparation is important. Never wash or rinse raw chicken, and always thoroughly clean hands, utensils, and surfaces after handling raw chicken.

Both uncooked and cooked chicken should be kept in the refrigerator, where it will keep for a few days. Refrigerate or freeze leftover chicken within two hours of serving. Both raw and cooked chicken can also be frozen for up to nine months.

How to Prepare

The way you prepare chicken breast can change the fat and calorie count of your meal significantly. Roasting, broiling, poaching, and grilling are generally the healthiest preparation methods if you are looking to limit fat in your meal. Breading your chicken, frying or sautéing it in butter or oil, or adding condiments such as barbecue sauce will add fat and calories. 

Recipes

Healthy Chicken Breast Recipes to Try

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Chicken, broiler or fryers, breast, skinless, boneless, meat only, cooked, grilled. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  2. Chicken, breast, roasted, broiled, or baked, skin eaten. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  3. Bosse JD, Dixon BM. Dietary protein to maximize resistance training: A review and examination of protein spread and change theories. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012;9(1):42. doi:10.1186/1550-2783-9-42

  4. McLeod M, Breen L, Hamilton DL, Philp A. Live strong and prosper: The importance of skeletal muscle strength for healthy ageing. Biogerontology. 2016;17(3):497-510. doi:10.1007/s10522-015-9631-7

  5. Kerstetter JE, Kenny AM, Insogna KL. Dietary protein and skeletal health: A review of recent human research. Curr Opin Lipidol. 2011;22(1):16-20. doi:10.1097/MOL.0b013e3283419441

  6. Leidy HJ, Tang M, Armstrong CL, Martin CB, Campbell WW. The effects of consuming frequent, higher protein meals on appetite and satiety during weight loss in overweight/obese men. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011;19(4):818-24. doi:10.1038/oby.2010.203

  7. Hemmer W, Klug C, Swoboda I. Update on the bird-egg syndrome and genuine poultry meat allergy. Allergo J Int. 2016;25:68-75. doi:10.1007/s40629-016-0108-2

  8. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Eating right for chronic kidney disease. Updated October 2016.

  9. US Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service. Meat and poultry labeling terms. Updated August 10, 2015.

  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chicken and food poisoning. Updated February 19, 2020.

Sours: https://www.verywellfit.com/how-many-calories-in-chicken-breast-3495665

Chicken oz calories breast

Skinless Chicken Breast

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size1 oz of boneless, cooked, skinless

Amount Per Serving

Calories

31

 

% Daily Values*

Total Fat

0.35g

0%

Saturated Fat

0.092g

0%

Trans Fat

0.006g

Polyunsaturated Fat

0.078g

Monounsaturated Fat

0.084g

Cholesterol

16mg

5%

Sodium

18mg

1%

Total Carbohydrate

0g

0%

Dietary Fiber

0g

0%

Sugars

0g

Protein

6.47g

Vitamin D

-

Calcium

3mg

0%

Iron

0.2mg

1%

Potassium

71mg

2%

Vitamin A

2mcg

0%

Vitamin C

0.3mg

0%

2%

of RDI*

(31 calories)

2% of RDI

Calorie Breakdown:

 

Carbohydrate (0%)

 

Fat (11%)

 

Protein (89%)

Photos

Nutrition summary:

Calories

31

Fat

0.35g

Carbs

0g

Protein

6.47g

There are 31 calories in 1 ounce of boneless, cooked, skinless Skinless Chicken Breast.
Calorie breakdown: 11% fat, 0% carbs, 89% protein.

Other Common Serving Sizes:

Related Types of Chicken Breast:

Related Types of Chicken:

See Also:

Sours: https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/generic/chicken-breast-skinless?portionid=4751536&portionamount=1.000&frc=True
Raw vs Cooked Calories

There are so many protein-packed foods to choose from: fish, steak, eggs, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds, meat alternatives. Heck, even veggies have protein.

One tried-and-true lean protein source that's stood the test of time (for non-vegans and vegetarians): chicken breast. The meat offers a whopping 28 grams of protein per 3 oz serving, which is higher than what you'd get from steak, pork, roasted turkey, lamb, and even rotisserie chicken, says Laura Iu, RD, a nutritionist in New York City. Bow down, other proteins. Bow down.

Okay, so it's protein-packed, but other than that, is chicken breast really as good for you as it seems?

How do chicken breast nutrition and calories stack up?

According to the USDA, a 3.5-ounce serving of roasted chicken breast without the skin contains:

  • Calories: 165
  • Protein: 31 g
  • Fat: 4 g
  • Saturated fat: 1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 0 g
  • Fiber: 0 g
  • Sodium: 74 mg

    Now consider the differences when you keep the skin on:

    • Calories: 197
    • Protein: 30 g
    • Fat: 8 g
    • Saturated fat: 2 g
    • Carbohydrates: 0 g
    • Fiber: 0 g
    • Sodium: 71 mg

    As you can see, keeping the skin on doubles the fat and saturated fat content, but adds a modest number of calories—about 30.

    One key thing to remember is that these numbers are for a 3.5-ounce serving. That's slightly more than half of the average chicken breast. This is what you'll get for a whole, boneless, skinless chicken breast:

    • Calories: 284
    • Protein: 53 g
    • Fat: 6 g
    • Saturated Fat: 1.7 g
    • Carbohydrates: 0 g
    • Fiber: 0 g
    • Sodium: 127 mg

    So if you eat the whole thing, you'll be getting a LOT more protein—but also way more calories and fat. (Fun fact: Chickens have quadrupled in size since the 1950s, according to research published in the journal Poultry Science.)

    What about chicken breast's overall nutrition?

    Chicken breast obviously has a ton of protein. But it also offers 6 percent of your daily value of iron per 3.5-ounce serving, which helps carry oxygen throughout your body and supports immune system function.

    Research also shows that consuming chicken breast is associated with a lower risk of developing heart disease and diabetes, per a study in the journal Food & Nutrition Research.

    Chicken breast also offers an especially concentrated amount of B vitamins and zinc, which is especially great for women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. But, wait, that's not all! It's also a good source of bone-boosting vitamin D and calcium, according to Iu.

    So rest assured, chicken is not overrated. Now, all you need to do is nail down the healthiest way to make it and you'll be set.

    So, what is the healthiest way to cook chicken breast?

    One of the many perks of this powerhouse poultry is that it's super versatile, meaning you can cook it in a number of different ways—grill it, roast it, toss it over a green salad, shred and put it into tacos or wraps, or even skewer it and smother it in peanut sauce. So. Many. Options.

    This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    But, of course, the healthiest ways to cook chicken are poaching, grilling, or baking it, says Iu. When you grill or bake, go for unsaturated plant-based oils (like EVOO or avocado oil) to minimize adding unnecessary saturated fats to your dish. And when you poach or boil it, be sure to do so on low heat, so there is minimal loss of nutrients, Iu says.

    Also: Make sure to remove any tendons, blood spots, and fat before cooking. (Because, yuck.)

    Speaking of a high-protein diet...here's how Jersey Shore's Vinny Guadagnino stocks his keto-friendly fridge:


    And, yes, removing the skin will allow for chicken with the fewest cals and fat. But cooking with the skin has its fair share of perks as well. "Keeping the skin on will add a lot of flavor and helps retain moisture and juiciness," says Taylor Chan, RD, dietitian and personal trainer in Baltimore, Maryland. "Whether to keep it on or not all depends on what’s important to you."

    Pro tip: You can always cook with the skin for enhanced flavor but nix it before you dig in.

    Finally, what are the best ways to eat chicken breast?

    With a fork and knife, of course... (Okay, okay, that's it for the dad jokes—promise.)

    It all depends on your health goals and flavor preferences. But, per Chan, it's always a good idea to keep it fun and try new preparation methods. Use a spice rub one night, or a new BBQ sauce for another. "Food should be enjoyable and not feel like a chore. So try to get away from the monotony of chicken, rice, and broccoli that so many people get trapped in," Chan says. (Unless you're a fan of that combo, in which case, more power to ya!)

    Ready to give chicken breast a go at home? Check out these nutritious recipes:


    SkinnyMs.

    Chicken Breasts With Quinoa and Kale

    Garnishing wilted kale and warm quinoa with walnuts and onions creates a unique texture that's sure to please your taste buds.

    GET THE RECIPE

    Per serving: 271 calories, 15 g (sat 2 g) fat, 23 g carbs, 221 mg sodium, 4 g fiber, 13 g protein


    WellPlated

    Sheet Pan Italian Chicken

    All you need to make this super colorful (thanks to seasonal veggies like zucchini and tomatoes) one-pan wonder? One. Hour.

    Get the recipe

    Per serving: 323 calories, 16 g (sat 3 g) fat, 7 g carbs, 6 g sugar, 2 g fiber, 44 g protein


    Cotter Crunch

    Chili-Lime Mango Marinated Chicken Bowls

    Get the recipe

    Fresh fruit, a splash of OJ, and a touch of white wine come together to create a tasty, summery dish. This is a great way to refresh your go-to chicken and rice duo.

    Per serving: 270 calories, 10 g (sat 3 g) fat, 18 g carbs,27 g protein

    Jessica MigalaJessica Migala is a health writer specializing in general wellness, fitness, nutrition, and skincare, with work published in Women’s Health, Glamour, Health, Men’s Health, and more.

    Elizabeth BacharachElizabeth Bacharach is the Assistant Editor at Women’s Health where she writes and edits content about mental and physical health, food and nutrition, sexual health, and lifestyle trends across WomensHealthMag.com and the print magazine.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

    Sours: https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19422590/calories-in-a-chicken-breast/

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