Oklahoma historical society indian archives

Oklahoma historical society indian archives DEFAULT









Tracing your Indian roots can be challenging whether you're hoping to gain tribal membership or to fill in your family tree. There are many roads you will have to take, literally and figuratively, but if you have the patience it will be rewarding.

Before you begin you will need to be familiar with a few terms. Listed below are just some that you will encounter quite frequently.

  • HENDERSON ROLL: This is a Census Roll of Cherokee Indians East of the Mississippi for It is very difficult to read but there is an Index available.
  • DAWES ROLL: This is a tribal membership roll created by Congress for each of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole tribes. The Roll was closed in with over , names but in Congress added more members. If you are loo king for an ancestor from one of these tribes, you must find them on the Dawes Final Roll to gain tribal membership.
  • GUION MILLER ROLLS: This roll was completed in and lists those who were Eastern Cherokee during the Treaties of and or their descendants.
  • US. FEDERAL CENSUS: The United States began taking a census in ten year increments in the year The Census Records for , however, did not include a category for Indians. For an Indian to be listed during those years they had to have been living in a white or black settlement and even then they would have been listed as white or black. In Indians were included in the Census but only if they paid taxes. In non-tax paying Indians were added but it wasn't until that anyone liv ing on a reservation was added to the Census. Unfortunately, the entire Census was destroyed by fire so is the first real Census to include Indians both on and off the reservation.
  • AGENCY ROLLS: Various reservation agents throughout the country created membership rolls for the tribes in their areas.





To begin your search you will need to make a list of all the names of your birth family. Begin with yourself and work back listing your parents and each of their parents and so on. When you have listed every generation you can remember, start asking everyone in your family if they can fill in any names you don't have on your list. Include any nicknames or Indian names as well. As you make your list, write down where that person was born, died, is buried or where they lived at specific times.

In your search you will most likely need to do research at the Oklahoma Historical Society's Archives. Below is a list of information that they will need to assist Since their only location is in Oklahoma City, and they are not able to do your research for you, you may have to do some traveling. It is important to make time in your schedule to be prepared when you arrive.


*** Searching the Five Tribes

1. Which family member was Native American or living with a tribe in Indian Territory during ? With which tribe did he/she live?
&# &# &# &# In order for a person to apply for the Dawes Roll he/she had to physically live with the tribe on tribal land. If your ancestor lived outside of the tribal area during enrollment, then he/she did not qualify for enrollment. If you have another family member who is on a tribal roll, such as an aunt or uncle, verify his/her parents names and birth places. While his/her information may not help you get on the tribal rolls it may help to fill in names or information that you did not ha ve.
&# &# &# &# If you found your ancestor on the U S Census (available in the Oklahoma Historical Society's Research Library) and he/she is listed as being white, then 99% of the time he/she will not have been enrolled in a tribe.
&# &# &# &# If you found your ancestor lived in Indian Territory during then they may be listed on the Indian Territory Census-Indian Schedule located on the first floor in the Research Library.

2. The Oklahoma Historical Society's Research Library and Archives have copies of the final Dawes Roll for the Five Tribes. Once you have the name or names of your ancestors you believe to be Native American you can look them up in the final rolls. Alw ays cross check other tribal rolls. Sometimes a person may have inadvertently ended up on a roll for the tribe that their spouse belonged to or the roll for a tribe which lived nearby.

3. If you find your ancestor on a Dawes Roll then you need to get a copy of their enrollment card. The Oklahoma Historical Society's Research Library and Archives has the Dawes Rolls, as does the Southwest Branch of the National Archives in Ft. Worth, Texas.


*** Plains and Woodland Tribes

1. Check the U.S. Census (Oklahoma Historical Society's Research Library) for your ancestor.

2. Check the allotment rolls for your ancestor in each agency you are researching. These are available in the Archives. If you find your ancestor listed on the roll it will have a description of their allotment which you need to copy. The agency rolls may be listed by the tribal name or by the agency.

Once the information above is located, the Archives can direct you in the next step in tracing your Native American ancestor.


RESOURCES

There are innumerable resources available for researching your family roots. Below are just a few to get you started.

Archive Resources

1. ** "Native American Records. The collection contains million documents and 6, volumes representing 66 of the 67 native tribes that reside in Indian Territory. (Osage records can be found at the Southwest Bra nch of the National Archives in Ft. Worth, TX). Other resources include the 1 volume Indian-Pioneer History, a collection of oral histories done by the Federal Writers Project in "

2. Indian Confederate Records and Union Muster Rolls.

3. Indian Archives Index. Section "X" Vertical files include genealogies, biography files, information on Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory.
** Section X, the Archives' vertical files, contains news clippings, information on Native Americans and pioneers, and more."

4. Oral Interviews and oral histories (written, oral, and video).
** "Oral histories include many subjects and individuals with over 5, interviews and recorded events. Extensive indexes are provided by name."

5. Manuscript collections.
** "These represent unpublished collections of public and private papers, scrapbooks, business records, collections of scholars, and more. Guides to collections and limited indexes are available."

6. Photography collections.
** "The Photographic section contains , images that range from the late 's to the present with many subjects represented."

7. Numerous old maps.

8. Newspaper archives from state and tribal sources.
** "The Newspaper collection contains 28, reels, of microfilm on state newspapers from to the present Some indexing is available. Newspapers often are a good source for marriage and death notices."


** Oklahoma Historical Society Brochure, "A Guide to the Research Library and Archives."
*** Information per interview with Phyllis Adams / OHS Archives.



Sours: https://thorpe.law.ou.edu/OILS/trace.html

BIA Records: Oklahoma

This guide is arranged geographically by state and thereunder contains a listing of tribes and bands living within that state’s borders. Under each entry for a tribe or band is a list of the BIA offices which had a jurisdictional relationship with that tribe, and for which the National Archives holds records. The NARA facility which has records for that office is listed in parentheses next to the entry. We have provided direct links into the National Archives Catalog whenever possible for each of these agencies, office, and/or superintendencies. For each, the National Archives Catalog has tallied the number of descriptions and series available. Note, the National Archives Catalog may include multiple derivations of the agencies, offices, and superintendies name.

It has been impossible to include the name of every subagency and special agency. The most significant omissions are the agencies and subagencies established during the early years of a superintendency, when agents were moved about without permanent assignments to a particular tribe or locality.

Oklahoma

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Apache Tribe of Oklahoma [Kiowa-Apache]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Arapaho Tribe [Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Cherokee Nation [The Five Civilized Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Cheyenne Tribe [Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Chickasaw Nation [The Five Civilized Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma [The Five Civilized Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Citizen Potawatomi Nation

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s): Comanche Nation

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Creek [The Five Civilized Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Delaware Tribe of Indians [The Five Civilized Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Eastern Shawnee Tribe [The Five Civilized Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Fort Sill Apache Tribe

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Iowa Nation of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Kaw Nation

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Kiowa Tribe

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Kickapoo Tribe [Mexican Kickapoo]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Miami Tribe of Oklahoma [Quapaw]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s): Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Osage Nation

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Otoe-Missouria Tribe

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Pawnee Nation

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Sac and Fox Nation

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Seminole Nation of Oklahoma
[The Five Civilized Tribes]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Wichita and Affiliated Tribes
[Caddo, Anadarko, Waco, Hainai, and Tawakoni]

 

Tribe(s)/Band(s):
Wyandotte Nation

Sours: https://www.archives.gov/research/native-americans/bia-guide/oklahoma.html
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What are primary sources?  Primary sources are records in real time or a first-hand descriptions of events. For example, journalists on the scene, an eyewitness, spectator, or an observer can all provide immediate accounts of an event. Among the many items considered as primary are narratives, interviews, diaries, letters, memos, memoirs, speeches, photographs, maps, oral histories, government records/documents, and more. The following links provide information about primary sources and the difference between different kinds of sources (primary, secondary, and tertiary).
 

 Enter in key terms and add some of the keywords to narrow the search for primary source information. Some of the items will not be primary sources in the keyword search, but many will be.

oral histor* (Note: by placing an asterisk, the search will look for all variations of the root word, e.g. history, histories, historical)
"oral history" (Note: enclosing the phrase by using quotations marks, the search will locate records with the complete phrase)
personal narratives
speeches
documents
diaries
memoirs
interviews
archives
microform
letters
Combine these keywords with search terms:
"cold war" and memoirs or use "cold war" memoirs
president speeches or use campaign speeches
reconstruction documents
immigration sources

Sours: https://library.nsuok.edu/c.php?g=&p=
Stars and Stripes. 1976.

American Indian Archives and More

Home |   Research Center |   American Indian Records |  American Indian Archives

This telegram informs Grant Foreman of the legislation's approval.

The archives include federal Indian records placed in the society's custody in by an act of Congress. Containing more than million documents and 6, volumes, the collection represents sixty-six tribes. These tribes either were relocated by removal or are native to the area. These records include a variety of official documents and information relating to tribes in Indian and Oklahoma Territory.

Search the Index

A partial index to the American Indian Archives is now online.
Search the Index to the American Indian Archives

Access to the American Indian Archives
At this time the American Indian Archives is being reprocessed. The staff and volunteers of the Manuscript Archives are replacing folders and boxes for preservation, updating the online catalog, and working to make the collection more available for research. As a result of this process, we ask that you use the microfilm in the Research Center. The original documents that have not been microfilmed will be unavailable on the catalog for all tribes except the Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Muscogee (Creek), Seminole, and the Dawes Commission. A listing of this microfilm can be found in information and links below. We apologize for any inconvenience that this may cause. If you have any questions, please contact the Manuscript Archives at or [email protected]

The Research Division is an affiliate of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). These records are part of National Archives Record Group 75 (Bureau of Indian Affairs) stored at the Oklahoma Historical Society under An act of Congress, March 27, , (H. R. Public No. ) and through an Agreement with NARA. Additional Bureau of Indian Affairs records for Oklahoma may be found at the National Archives. For more information, see BIA Records: Oklahoma at archives.gov/research/native-americans/bia-guide/oklahoma.html

Records of the Five Tribes

The records of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek), and Seminole date from to These records contain primary documentation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches as well as district and county records. Included are census records, accounts of legislative sessions, court dockets, correspondence, election records, treasurer’s records, materials relating to land allotment and leases, and school records. Extensive information about agriculture, citizenship, education, American Indian-white relations, law enforcement, and a variety of aspects of life in Indian Territory can be found in these documents.

Microfilm Guides
Many documents in the American Indian Archives have been microfilmed. Use the links below to find out what records are available on microfilm in the OHS Research Center. All guides are in PDF format.
Cherokee National Records Microfilm Guide
Chickasaw National Records Microfilm Guide
Choctaw National Records Microfilm Guide
Creek National Records Microfilm Guide
Seminole National Records Microfilm Guide
National Archives Records Microfilm Guide (includes multiple tribes)

The Foreman Transcripts
View thirty volumes of transcriptions of records from the Office of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Office of the Superintendent for the Five Civilized Tribes, and London Public Record Office. Explore the Foreman Transcripts.

Dawes Commission Records
Of special note are the records of the Dawes Commission, whose primary function was to administer the enrollment of the citizens and Freedmen of the Five Tribes in preparation for allotment of land. Much of the primary records of the Five Tribes is used by individuals researching ancestors who may have been enrolled by the Dawes Commission. Since the mids new importance has been placed upon the records of the Five Tribes. These records provide the only source for determining tribal membership today.
Dawes Commission Records Microfilm Guide
Teachers’ Reports Index, Dawes Commission Records

Indian Agency Records

The American Indian Archives include federal records of the various Indian agencies established to administer activities among the tribes relocated to the territory during the nineteenth century. These records span the s to

Individual Indian Files

These files vary in content from agency to agency, but in most cases, the files pertain to grazing or mineral leases.
Search Individual Indian File index

Indian Agency Records on Microfilm

Many documents in the American Indian Archives have been microfilmed. Use the microfilm guides linked below to find out what records are available on microfilm in the OHS Research Center. The guides also include records microfilmed by the National Archives. All guides listed below are in PDF format.

Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency Records Microfilm Guide

Kiowa Agency Records Microfilm Guide
Includes Apache, Caddo, Comanche, Delaware, Kichai, Kiowa, Tawakoni, Waco, and Wichita Tribes

Osage Agency Records Microfilm Guide
Includes Osage and some Kaw records

Pawnee Agency Records Microfilm Guide
Includes Eastern Shawnee, Confederated Peoria, Nez Perce, Ottawa, Pawnee, Ponca, Quapaw, Seneca, and Wyandotte Tribes

Quapaw Agency Records Microfilm Guide
Includes Cayuga, Chippewa, Citizen Potawatomi, Delaware, Kaskaskia, Kaw, Miami, Munsee, Nez Perce, Oneida, Ottawa, Peoria, Piankashaw, Ponca, Quapaw, Seneca of Sandusky, Seneca of Lewiston, Shawnee, Wea, and Wyandotte Tribes

Sac and Fox–Shawnee Agency Records Microfilm Guide
Includes Absentee Shawnee, Citizen Band Potawatomi, Ioway, Mexican Kickapoo, and Sac and Fox Tribes

National Archives Records Microfilm Guide
Includes records for multiple tribes

School Records

Also included are records of the Indian schools established in Indian Territory such as Chilocco and Mekusukey Academy. These valuable collections of agency files provide important data as to the day to day operation of agency affairs. Files will include Indian culture, census and annuity, per capita, leases especially cattle grazing and pasture, field matrons, farmers, ceremonies, allotments and customs just to name a few.

Chilocco Indian School
This federal boarding school operated from to in Kay County. Select records pertaining to the school have been microfilmed.
Chilocco School Microfilm Guide

Sours: https://www.okhistory.org/research/indianarchive

Archives oklahoma indian historical society

Oklahoma Historical Society

The OHS is located in the Oklahoma History Center in Oklahoma City.

The Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS) has been collecting, preserving, and sharing the history of Oklahoma and its people since , before statehood in [1] This is the major resource for Oklahoma genealogy. They offer much information online – or at least there is an online index and you can request the actual records, for example from their indexed vertical files.

Newspapers[edit | edit source]

The Gateway to Oklahoma History provides free access to , issues and , pages of historical newspaper content free of charge. You can search for newspaper articles by keyword, date, publication, or location. See The Gateway to Oklahoma History. Many more newspapers on microfilm are available to view at the Research Center.

Territorial Records[edit | edit source]

The Oklahoma Historical Society has numerous records from the territorial period, including these:

To see other territorial records and instructions for finding more, such as marriage records, click here.

Native American Records[edit | edit source]

Many resources are available from OHS, including these:

Genealogy[edit | edit source]

A variety of records are available online, including some land records, county records, school records, divorce records, directories, funeral home records, and military records are available here. Besides this goldmine of records, they also have the following:

  • Manuscript Collection present (bulk )
  • Audio and Oral Histories The Oral History Collection includes approximately 3, recorded interviews pertaining to a wide range of Oklahoma topics. The interviews date from to the present day.
  • Newspaper Archives Microfilm collection is separate from the Gateway cited above. The newspaper collection currently consists of over 4, titles on approximately 33, reels of microfilm (of which 28, reels were produced in-house.) OHS has the oldest, largest, and most complete collection of newspapers available within the State.
  • Vertical Files These cover a variety of subjects including towns and counties in Oklahoma, various events, American Indian tribes and biographical files and some specific families. Files may contain newspaper clippings, WPA writings, pamphlets, brochures, programs, and fliers.

Photographs[edit | edit source]

The OHS began collecting photographs in , and today there are an estimated 9 million images in the photographic archives collections. There are two places to view photographs online. Visit the OHS Research Center's online catalog at http://www.okhistory.org/catalog or visit The Gateway to Oklahoma History at http://gateway.okhistory.org.

To see their photo search instructions, click here. To learn more about the photo collection as well as prices for ordering copies, click here.

Oklahoma History and Culture[edit | edit source]

They also publish The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, a two-volume work. The online version is available for free, and is continually updated. View The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture online at http://www.okhistory.org/encyclopedia/.


Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahoma History Center
Nazih Zuhdi Drive
Oklahoma City, OK


Oklahoma Historical Society

References[edit | edit source]

Sours: https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Oklahoma_Historical_Society
Stars and Stripes. 1976.

American Indian Records and Resources

Home |   Research Center |  American Indian Records

The American Indian Archives

Since the Oklahoma Historical Society American Indian Archives have housed American Indian records for numerous tribes. The records came to the Oklahoma Historical Society after Congress passed legislation giving the OHS custody of the materials. These records include a variety of official documents and information relating to tribes in Indian and Oklahoma Territory. The archives include a significant number of records pertaining to the Five Tribes as well as other tribes.

The Research Division is an affiliate of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Learn about the records in the American Indian Archives.

Dawes Rolls and American Indian Ancestry

The following resources are available for researching your Indian ancestry. If you are searching for a connection to one of the Five Tribes—Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee, and Seminole—consult the Dawes Final Roll. This final roll is the basis for determining eligibility for tribal citizenship.

Dawes Rolls and Related Records
Dawes Final Rolls of the Five Civilized Tribes
Hastain's Township Plats of the Creek Nation
Moore's Seminole Roll and Land Guide
Removal of Restrictions, Five Tribes

Additional Indian Records and Resources

Applications for Enrollment, Five Tribes
American Indian and Alaskan Native Documents in the Congressional Serial Set: –(from the University of Oklahoma)
American Indian Censuses on Microfilm, various tribes
Chilocco Indian School Index
Foreman Transcripts, various tribes
Indian Agency Employees, Official Register of the United States, various tribes
American Indian Archives Index, various tribes
Individual Indian Files, Plains tribes
Litton Papers, Five Tribes
Finding Your American Indian Ancestors (PDF)

American Indian Removal

More than sixty different tribes relocated to present-day Oklahoma during the nineteenth century. Although some tribes moved voluntarily, most were forcibly removed from their homelands and assigned to a reservation in Indian Territory. To learn more, view an outline and timeline of Indian removal.

Explore More

The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture
Links to tribes in Oklahoma today




The Office of American Indian Culture and Preservation

This office was established in by the Board of Directors of the Oklahoma Historical Society. The purpose of this office is to strengthen the ties between the federally recognized tribes of Oklahoma and the OHS, to work closely with tribal cultural preservation staff and assist with issues requiring expertise and guidance with culturally important materials, to conduct oral history projects with tribal elders, to provide workshops regarding preservation issues, to enhance collections development of American Indian materials, and to enhance research opportunities for tribal groups or individuals regarding the OHS collections.

Chad Williams

Sours: https://www.okhistory.org/research/americanindians

Now discussing:

Indigenous Peoples of Oklahoma

Okterritory

Online Resources[edit | edit source]

  • Indian Pioneer Papers
  • Index to the Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory (Dawes) National Archives.
  • OHS Dawes Final Rolls Index only.
  • OK/ITGenWeb Indian and Oklahoma Territory Genealogy
  • Oklahoma and Indian Territory, Marriage, Citizenship and Census Records, ($)
  • Oklahoma and Indian Territory, Indian Censuses and Rolls, , ($), index
  • Oklahoma, Historical Indian Archives Index,
  • Oklahoma and Indian Territory, Land Allotment Jackets for Five Civilized Tribes, ($)
  • U.S., Indian Census Rolls, , ($), index
  • Wallace Roll of Cherokee Freedmen, , ($), index
  • Choctaw Nation Marriage Index
  • Chickasaw Nation Marriage Index
  • U.S., Native American Citizens and Freedmen of Five Civilized Tribes, , ($), index
  • Dawes Commission Index (overturned),
  • U.S., Citizenship Case Files in Indian Territory, , index
  • OHS Applicants for Enrollment among the members of the Five Civilized Tribes. Index only.
  • Oklahoma, Applications for Enrollment to the Five Civilized Tribes, Index and images.
  • Oklahoma and Indian Territory, Dawes Census Cards for Five Civilized Tribes, ($)
  • U.S., Native American Enrollment Cards for the Five Civilized Tribes, , ($), index
  • Oklahoma, Applications for Allotment, Five Civilized Tribes, Images.
  • Oklahoma Osage Tribe Roll, ($)
  • Oklahoma, Indian Land Allotment Sales, ($)
  • U.S., Cherokee Baker Roll and Records, , ($), index

See also:

Native American Online Genealogy Records

Tribes and Bands of Oklahoma[edit | edit source]

The following list of American Indians who have lived in Oklahoma has been compiled from Hodge's Handbook of American Indians[1] and from Swanton's The Indian Tribes of North America[2]. Some may simply be variant spellings for the same tribe.

Alabama, Apache, Apalachee, Arapaho, Biloxi, Caddo, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chickasaw, Comanche, Creek, Delaware, Fox, Hitchiti,Illinois, Iowa, Iroquois, Jicarilla, Kansa, Kichai, Kickapoo, Kiowa, Kiowa-Apache, Koasati, Lipan, Miami, Mikasuki, Missouri, Modoc, Muklasa, Munsee, Muskhogean, Muskogee, Natchez, Nez Perce, Okmulgee, Osage, Oto, Ottawa. Pawnee, Peoria, Piankashaw, Ponca, Potawatomi, Quapaw, SaukSeminole, Seneca, Shawnee, Tawakonie, Tawehash, Tonkawa,Waco, Wea, Wichita, Wyandot, Yscani, Yuchi

Oto-Missouri, Seneca-Cayuga, Cheyenne-Arapaho, Citizen Potawatomi, Eastern Shawnee, Fort Sill Indians, Kiowa-Chiricahua Bands

The Oklahoma Historical Society also has identified the "American Indian Nations" within the boundaries of their state. That list is available on their web site.

Wright, Muriel Hazel. A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, FHL book Wg or film item 11

Five Civilized Tribes(Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole)[edit | edit source]

Beginning in the 's, the U.S. Government began moving all tribes east of the Mississippi River to the Indian Territory in western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma. A series of treaties provided for the removal of almost all principal eastern tribes.

The Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole (known as the Five Civilized Tribes) were among the many southeastern tribes who were removed by treaty to Indian Territory. In the Cherokees who had not already moved voluntarily were forced to move to Indian Territory. This migration became known as the “Trail of Tears.” Large parcels of land were distributed to these five tribes who became self-governing “Nations.”

White settlers moving west after the Civil War pressured the government to extinguish Native American title to lands and relocate them. The alliance between the Five Civilized Tribes and the Confederacy during the Civil War also provided Congress with an excuse to realign tribal boundaries. Treaties in and later reduced the land of the Five Civilized Tribes by almost half. These created the “Unassigned Lands” in central Oklahoma that were eventually opened for land runs.

Other Tribes[edit | edit source]

Some of the western land forfeited by the Five Civilized Tribes was reserved for other tribes through later treaties. These lands in the Indian Territory were assigned to tribes such as the Kiowa, Comanche, Wichita, and Cheyenne. Other tribes were later brought in at various periods from Texas, Nebraska, California, Oregon, Idaho, Arizona, and other states. As many as 65 tribes were eventually relocated to the state.

  • Absentee-Shawnee Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of the Shawnee Agency, Tribe: Shawnee
  • Alabama Quassarte Tribal Town
  • Alibamu
  • Apache Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Anadarko Agency, Tribe: Apache
  • Caddo Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Anadarko Agency, Tribe: Caddo
  • Citizen Potawatomi Tribe (OK): Federal, under the jurisdiction of Shawnee Agency, Tribe: Potawatomi
  • Delaware Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Anadarko Agency, Tribe: Delaware
  • Eastern Shawnee Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Miami Agency, Tribe: Shawnee
  • Fort Sill Tribe:  Federal, under the jurisdiction of the Anadarko Agency, Tribe: Apache
  • Huron
  • Miami Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of the Miami Agency, Tribe: Miami
  • Thlopthlocco Tribal Town
  • Tonkawa Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Pawnee Agency, Tribe: Tankawa
  • Tuskegee
  • United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee

Agencies of the Bureau of Indian Affairs[edit | edit source]

Agencies and subagencies were created as administrative offices of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its predecessors. Their purpose was (and is) to manage Indian affairs with the tribes, to enforce policies, and to assist in maintaining the peace. The names and location of these agencies may have changed, but their purpose remained basically the same. Many of the records of genealogical value were created by these offices.

The following list of agencies that have operated or now exist in Oklahoma has been compiled from Hill's Office of Indian Affairs[3], Hill's Guide to Records in the National Archives Relating to American Indians[4], and others.

  • Anadarko Agency, P.O. Box , Anadarko, OK
  • Ardmore Agency discontinued
  • Cantonment Agency
  • Cherokee Agency
  • Cheyenne and Arapahoe Agency
  • Choctaw Agency
  • Concho Agency, P.O. Box 96, Concho, OK,
  • Creek Agency
  • Darlington Agency -- location of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency
  • Five Civilized Tribes Agency
  • Kaw Agency
  • Kiowa Agency
  • Kiowa, Comanche, and Wichita Agency
  • Miami Agency, P. O. Box , Miami, OK,
  • Neosho Agency
  • Oakland Agency
  • Okmulgee Agency, P.O. Box , Okmulgee, OK
  • Osage Agency, Pawhuska, OK
  • Otoe Agency
  • Pawnee Agency, P. O. Box , Pawnee, OK
  • Ponca Agency
  • Quapaw Agency
  • Red Moon Agency
  • Seger Agency
  • Seminole Agency
  • Shawnee Agency, Route 5, Box , Shawnee, OK
  • Tahlequah Agency, P.O.Box , Tahequah, OK,
  • Talihina Agency, P. O. Box Drawer H, Talihina, OK
  • Tonkawa Agency
  • Union Agency
  • Upper Arkansas Agency
  • Wewoka Agency, P. O. Box , Wewaka, OK,
  • Wichita Agency

Records[edit | edit source]

The majority of records of individuals were those created by the agencies. Some records may be available to tribal members through the tribal headquarters.They were (and are) the local office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and were charged with maintaining records of the activities of those under their responsibility. Among these records are:

The Indian Archives Division of the Oklahoma Historical Society has an extensive collection for Native American research including copies of the Dawes Rolls. Many of these records are on microfilm at theFamily History Library.

Rolls of Indian Tribes in Oklahoma Absentee Shawnee (Big Jim's Band), Cheyenne and Arapahoe, Iowa, Kickapoo, Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache, Otoe, Missouri, Pawnee, Ponca, Pottawatomie and Fox. by Emily Johnson FHL film:

Approved Roll of Osage Indians in Oklahoma, FHL film: item 2

Vital Records Fort Sill Apaches, FHL film: item 8

Allotment Records[edit | edit source]

Allotted Tribes of Oklahoma

•Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Delaware, Shawnee (Eastern), Miami, Modoc, Creek (Muskogee,) Osage, Ottawa (Peoria), Quapaw, Seminole, Seneca, Shawnee (Absentee), Wyandotte •Apache of Oklahoma, Caddo, Cheyenne and Arapaho, Comanche, Fort Sill Apaches, Iowa, Kansa or Kaw, Kickapoo, Kiowa and Comanche, Otoe and Missouri, Pawnee, Ponca, Potawatomi-Citizen, Sac and Fox of Mississippi, Tonkawa, (Ponca, Oakland), Wichita •Otoe

School Records[edit | edit source]

  • Carter Seminary, FHL film: item
  • Chilcocco Indian School , FHL film: items
  • Eucheee Indian School lists, FHL film: item 14
  • Eufaula Indian School enrollment lists, , FHL film: item
  • Jones Academy , FHL film: items
  • Seneca Indian School. FHL film: items
  • Sequoyah Indian School FHL film: items , and , and item 4

Orphanage[edit | edit source]

The Goodland Indian Orphanage. By Sammy D. Hogue. FHL  book Hr Vol. 1 and 2Worldcat

Indian Schools[edit | edit source]

The Office of Indian Affairs (now the Bureau of Indian Affairs) established a network of schools throughout the United States, beginning with Carlisle Indian School, established in Some of these schools were day schools, usually focusing on Indian children of a single tribe or reservation. Some were boarding schools which served Indian children from a number of tribes and reservations.

In addition, other groups such as various church denominations established schools specifically focusing on Native American children. (read more)

The following list of Indian Schools in Oklahoma has been compiled from Hill's Office of Indian Affairs[5], Hill's Guide to Records in the National Archives Relating to American Indians[6], and others.

Indian Health Facilities[edit | edit source]

Land Allotment Records[edit | edit source]

Main article: Allotment Records for Indigenous Peoples of the United States


Many Indians received allotments of land. These records are described in the United States Research Outline ().

Dawes Rolls[edit | edit source]

Main article: Dawes Commission Enrollment Records


The Dawes “Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes”  (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole) was established in to enroll individuals as citizens of one of the five tribes. When the governments of the Five Civilized Tribes were dissolved in , the U.S. Government granted parcels of their land to qualified native individuals.

Many white persons had married Native Americans, and thus were eligible for land. The enrollment records of the Dawes Commission were used to determine eligibility for land.

The commission reviewed the enrollment applications and abstracted the information onto cards known as Enrollment Cards for the Five Civilized Tribes, (On 93 Family History Library films beginning with ) These records document about , Native Americans. The original applications are at the National Archives at Fort Worth and are on Family History Library films, Applications for Enrollment of the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, , beginning with Family History Library film

You can search the Dawes Roll for names of persons.

A helpful guide and index to these records is Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, The Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory.2 vols. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, [?]. (Family History Library film item 2.)(Index is on film )

Guion Miller Cherokee Rolls[edit | edit source]

Main article: Guion Miller Roll for Eastern Cherokee


In , the U.S. Government appointed Guion Miller to compile a roll of Cherokees eligible for compensation from the government for lands taken in the s. Applicants had to document their lineage back to an Eastern Cherokee living in the s and prove that they had not affiliated with any other tribe. Over 45, applications that document about 90, Cherokees living about are in Eastern Cherokee Applications, (On Family History Library films beginning with ; film has an index.)

These rolls can be searched online at http://www.archives.gov/research/arc/native-americans-guion-miller.html

Doris Duke Oral History Project[edit | edit source]

From to , several universities conducted oral history interviews with Native Americans. The project was funded by Doris Duke, heiress of the Duke tobacco family. The University of Oklahoma was one of the universities that participated in the project. Transcripts of those interviews are online through the University of Oklahoma in Norman. See Oral Histories

Indian Pioneer Papers[edit | edit source]

"My mother, Carolina Jones, was born in the state of Tennessee and is buried there. My grandmother on my mother's side, Nancy Jones, was born in the state of Mississippi and is buried in White County, Tennessee. I was born April 3, , at Stagestand, White County, Tennessee "[7]

This paragraph begins a fourteen page interview of William Perry Earles of Ringling, Oklahoma, , as part of a project called The Indian-Pioneer Papers . In , the Oklahoma Historical Society and University of Oklahoma requested a writer's project grant from the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in which interviews would be conducted with early settlers in Oklahoma who had lived on Indian land. More than writers conducted over 11, interviews and were asked to "call upon early settlers and (record) the story of the migration to Oklahoma and their early life here."[8]

The University of Oklahoma Western History Collection has digitized the Indian Pioneer Papers which consists of approximately 80, indexed entries arranged alphabetically by personal name, place name, or subject. [9] An index to the Indian Pioneer Papers may also be found at OkGenWeb Oklahoma Genealogy. To view a separate index of the “Indians in the Indian Pioneer Papers” click here.

The Collection may also be viewed at the Family History Library. "Indian Pioneer Papers, - " (Millwood, New York: Kraus Microform, ) FHL

Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Records[edit | edit source]

The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) was authorized to administer Indian programs beginning in A local field agency or subagency of the BIA served the tribes in a given area. Some of the agencies that served Oklahoma were the Concho, Kiowa, Osage, Pawnee, Quapaw, and Shawnee. Most of the agency records are at the National Archives at Fort Worth, with a few at the National Archives—Central Plains Region. For further information see Edward E. Hill, comp., Guide to Records in the National Archives Relating to American Indians. Washington, D.C.: National Archives, (Family History Library fiche )

The Family History Library has microfilm copies of many records of the BIA and the field agencies including:

  • Land allotment records.
  • Indian Census Rolls, , arranged by agencies for the entire United States (On Family Histroy Library films beginning with ).
  • BIA heirship, school, census, annuity, probate, land, vital, and other records.

Reservations[edit | edit source]

From the mids, the official policy of the United States government toward the Native Americans was to confine each tribe to a specific parcel of land called a reservation. Agencies were established on or near each reservation. A government representative, usually called an agent (or superintendent) was assigned to each agency. Their duties included maintaining the peace, making payments to the Native Americans based on the stipulations of the treaties with each tribe, and providing a means of communication between the native population and the federal government.

Sometimes, a single agency had jurisdiction over more than one reservation. And sometimes, if the tribal population and land area required it, an agency may have included sub-agencies.

The boundaries of reservations, over time, have changed. Usually, that means the reservations have been reduced in size. Sometimes, especially during the later policy of "termination," the official status of reservations was ended altogether.

For a current reservation map - Oklahoma - Indian Reservations - The National Atlas of the United States of America. Federal Lands and Indian Reservations. by the U.S. Department of Interior and U.S. Geological Survey.

The following list of reservations has been compiled from the National Atlas of the United States of America[10], the Omni Gazetteer of the United States of America[11], and other sources. Those reservations named in bold are current federally-recognized reservations, with their associated agency and tribe(s). Others have historically been associated with the state or are not currently recognized by the federal government.

  • Absentee-Shawnee Reservation
  • Apache Reservation
  • Caddo Reservation
  • Cherokee Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Thlequah Agency, Tribe: Cherokee
  • Cheyenne-Arapho Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Concho Agency, Tribes: Cheyenne & Arapho
  • Chickasaw Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Ardmore Agency, Tribe:Chickasaw
  • Choctaw Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Talihina Agency, Tribe Choctaw
  • Comanche Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Anadarko Agency, Tribe: Comanche
  • Creek Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Okmulgee Agency, Tribe: Creek
  • Iowa Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Shawnee Agency, Tribe: Iowa
  • Kansa (or Kaw) Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Pawnee Agency, Tribe: Kaw
  • Kickapoo Reservation: under the jurisdiction of Shawnee Aggency, Tribe: Kickapoo
  • Kiowa Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Anadarko Agency, Tribe: Kiowa
  • Modoc Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of the Miami Agency, Tribe: Modoc
  • Osage Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of the Osage Agency, Tribe: Osage
  • Oto Reservation:*Otoe-Missouria Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Pawnee Agency, Tribe Ote-Missouria
  • Ottawa Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Miami Agency, Tribe: Ottawa
  • Pawnee Reservation: Federal, uncer the jurisdiction of Pawnee Agency, Tribe: Pawnee
  • Peoria Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Miami Agency, Tribe: Peoria
  • Ponca Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Pawnee Agnency, Tribe: Ponca
  • Potawatomi Reservation:
  • Quapaw Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Miami Agency, Tribe: Quapaw
  • Sac and Fox Reservation: federal, under the jurisdiction of Shawnee Agency, Tribe: Sac and Fox
  • Seminole Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Wewoka Agency, Tribe: Seminole
  • Seneca Reservation:*Seneca-Cayuga Tribe: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Miami Agency, Tribe: Seneco-Cayuga
  • Wichita Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Anadarko Agency, Tribe: Wichita
  • Wyandot Reservation: Federal, under the jurisdiction of Miami Agency, Tribe: Wyandot

Family History Library[edit | edit source]

These are listed in the FamilySearch Catalog under Oklahoma Historical Society. Indian Archives Division. The Society's collections are described in Lawrence Kelly, “Indian Records in the Oklahoma Historical Society Archives,” The Chronicles of Oklahoma, [Oklahoma Periodicals].

Another major repository for Oklahoma Indian records is:

Five Civilized Tribes Museum
Federal Building
Agency Hill
Honor Heights Drive
Muskogee, OK
Telephone:
Fax:
Internet: www.fivetribes.org

See also FamilySearch Catalog Oklahoma Natvie Races for over titles of interest

Inventories and guides[edit | edit source]

The following guides describe some of the records available for Indian research:

  • Debo, Angie. “Major Indian Record Collections in Oklahoma,” in Indian-White Relations: A Persistent Paradox, edited by Jane Smith and Robert Kvasnicka. Washington, D.C.: Howard University Press,
  • Svoboda, Joseph G. Guide to American Indian Resource Materials in Great Plains Repositories. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska, Center for Great Plains Studies,
  1. ↑Hodge, Frederick Webb. Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Washington D.C.:Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin #30 Available online.
  2. ↑Swanton John R. The Indian Tribes of North America. Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin # Available online.
  3. ↑Hill, Edward E. The Office of Indian Affairs, Historical Sketches, Clearwater Publishing Co., Inc. (Family History Library book Ho.)
  4. ↑Hill, Edward E. (comp.). Guide to Records in the National Archives of the United States Relating to American Indians. Washington DC: National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, (FHLbook Hg.)
  5. ↑Hill, Edward E. The Office of Indian Affairs, Historical Sketches, Clearwater Publishing Co., Inc. (Family History Library book Ho.)
  6. ↑Hill, Edward E. (comp.). Guide to Records in the National Archives of the United States Relating to American Indians. Washington DC: National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, (FHLbook Hg.)
  7. ↑University of Oklahoma Libraries Western History Collection Interview with William Perry Earles of Ringling, Oklahoma. University of Oklahoma, Interviewer: Ethel V. Elder. Interviewee: William Perry Earles (ID - )
  8. ↑A.M. Gibson, ed., The West Wind Blows: The Autobiography of Edward Everett Dale (Oklahoma City: Oklahoma Historical Society, ), ; Grant Foreman, "The Oklahoma Historical Society," pamphlet, Vertical Files, Library Resources Division, Oklahoma Historical Society (hereafter cited as OHS LRD); "Indian-Pioneer History Project, W.P.A. ," The Chronicles of Oklahoma, 37 (Winter, ), As reported on okhistory.org/battlecry.html
  9. ↑The University of Oklahoma Western History Collections http://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/pioneer/
  10. ↑National Atlas of the United States of America -- Federal Lands and Indian Reservations Available online.
  11. ↑Isaacs. Katherine M., editor. Omni Gazetteer of the United States of America. U.S. Data Sourcebook, Volume 11 Appendices, Bureau of Indian Affairs List of American Indian Reservations, Appendix E, Indian Reservations. Omnigraphics, Inc.,

Other Repositories[edit | edit source]

  • Oklahoma Historical Society, Nazih Zudih Drive, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Five Civilized Tribes Agency, Federal Building, Muskogee, Oklahoma

See Also[edit | edit source]

Oklahoma Church for a list of missions

Oklahoma History for a calendar of events

Oklahoma Military for a list of forts

References[edit | edit source]

Bibliography[edit | edit source]

The following resources will aid in Native American research. American Indian Materials - Federal Depository Libraries of Oklahoma (PDF). The Family History Library (FHL) has a large collection of additional books and films on Native American research at www.familysearch.org:

  • "Accompanying Pamphlet for Microcopy ", National Archives Microfilm Publications, Appendix.
  • Alderman, Pat. Nancy Ward: Cherokee Chieftainess and Dragging Canoe: Cherokee- Chickamauga War Chief. Johnson City, Tennessee: The Overmountain Press. (FHL book Wa includes index.)
  • American Indians: A Select Catalog of National Archives Microfilm Publications. Washington DC: National Archives Trust Fund Board, National Archives and Records Administration,
  • Armstrong, K.M. and Curry, Bob. Chickasaw Rolls: Annuity Rolls of and the "" Chickasaw District Roll of As reported by Guion Miller, Special Commissioner. Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books Inc.  (FHL book Ca.)
  • Ashton, Sharon Standifer, compiler. Indians and Intruders, Vol II. Norman, Oklahoma: Ashton Books, (FHL book Cas; fiche )
  • Blankenship, Bob. Dawes Roll "Plus" of Cherokee Nation Cherokee, North Carolina: Cherokee Roots, (FHL book Bd.)
  • Blankenship, Bob. Guion Miller Roll "Plus". Cherokee, North Carolina: Cherokee Roots, (FHL book Cgmr.)
  • Bolt, Helen Deister, compiler. Kiowa Agency Mission Schools of OK Lawton, Oklahoma: Southwest Oklahoma Genealogical Society, n.d. (FHL book Kbh; film Item 1.)
  • Chase, Marybelle W., compiler. Cherokee Claims, Tahlequah District. Tulsa, Oklahoma: M. W. Chase, (FHL book Ccm; fiche )
  • Corry, Ruth, editor. The Georgia Genealogical Society Indian Issue Georgia:'Georgia Genealogical Society, Internet: http://www.gagensociety.org/
  • Corwin, Hugh D. The Kiowa Indians: Their History and Life Stories.Lawton, Oklahoma: privately printed, (FHL book Kc.)
  • Cottrell, Janet, compiler. Choctaw Rolls copied from "Index To The Final Rolls and Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory."Microfilm at the Oklahoma Historical Society, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Internet: http://www.okhistory.org/
  • Cox, Brent Yanusdi. Heart Of The Eagle: Dragging Canoe And The Emergence Of The ChickamaugaConfederacy.Milan, Tennessee: Chenanee Publishers, (FHL book Ccba.)
  • Debo, Angie. And Still The Waters Run. Reprint of original published Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, (FHL book Da.)
  • Delaware County Cemetery Readers. Cemeteries and Burial Places of Delaware County, Oklahoma.vols 1, 2, 3, 4 & index to series. Wyandotte, Oklahoma: Gregath Publishing Company, (FHL book V38c - 4 vols.) Note: Delaware County was in the former Delaware District of the Cherokee nation and the Cherokees who came over the Trail of Tears established nearly all the cemeteries and burial places iin this series.
  • DuPriest, Maude Ward; Bard, Jennie May; and Graham, Anna Foreman. Cherokee Recollections: The Story of the Indian Woman’s Pocahontas Club and Its Members in the Cherokee Nation and Oklahoma Beginning In Stillwater, Oklahoma: Thales Microuniversity Press,
  • Featherston, Shelley C., editor. "American Indian Genealogy: Selected Sources On The Eastern Cherokee." Prologue, vol 14 no 4, (Winter ).
  • Foreman, Grant. The Five Civilized Tribes.Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, . (FHL book Ff; fiche )
  • Foreman, Grant. The Five Civilized Tribes: A Brief History and A Century of Progress. Muskogee, Oklahoma: published by Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Press of Hoffman Printing Co, 'Originally published by Indian Centennial Board, (FHL book Ffc.)
  • Gannett, Henry. Gazateer of Indian Territory Facsimile reprint, published by Tulsa, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Yesterday Publications, (FHL book E2g.)
  • Gibson, Arrell M. The Chickasaws. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, (FHL book Cg.)
  • Glenn, Jordan H. and Holm, Thomas M, editors. Indian Leaders: Oklahoma’s First Statesmen. Oklahoma City: Oklahoma Historical Society, (FHL book D3j.)
  • Gross, Kristi Lake, compiler. Cherokee Research Checklist. Tulsa, Oklahoma: privately printed, (FHL book Cgk.)

Hampton, David Keith. Descendants of Nancy Ward: A Workbook For Further Research. Cane Hill, Arkansas: ARC Press of Cane Hill, (FHL book Wh; film Item 7.)

  • Hill, Edward E. (comp.). Guide to Records in the National Archives of the United States Relating to American Indians. Washington DC: National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration,
  • Hill, Edward E. The Office of Indian Affairs, Historical Sketches. New York, New York: Clearwater Publishing Company, Inc.,
  • Historical Sketches for Jurisdictional and Subject Headings Used for the Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, . National Archives Microcopy T

Huffman, Mary, compiler. The Five Civilized Tribes: A Bibliography of the Collection In The Oklahoma Historical Society. Oklahoma City: Oklahoma Historical Society,', revised. (FHL book A1 No. )

  • Hodge, Frederick Webb. Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Washington D.C.:Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin #30 Available online.
  • Inman, Jeannie. Seven Cemeteries , Index and Map.Delaware, Oklahoma: privately printed, Note: Includes the Bratcher and Armstrong-Journeycake cemeteries which are the oldest in city of Nowara, OK.They date back to early ’s. Principle Chief of the Delaware Tribe was Charles Journeycake.
  • Isaacs. Katherine M., editor. Omni Gazetteer of the United States of America. U.S. Data Sourcebook, Volume 11 Appendices, Bureau of Indian Affairs List of American Indian Reservations, Appendix E, Indian Reservations. Omnigraphics, Inc.,
  • Konawa Genealogical Society. Indian Territory Creek Muscogee Nation.Konawa, Oklahoma: Konawa Oklahoma Genealogical Society, no date. Internet: http://marti.rootsweb.com/Konawa/
  • Laub, Nancy L. and Miller, Jean LaR, compilers. North American Indian Tribes Excluding Five Civilized Tribes: A Bibliography of the Collections In the Oklahoma Historical Society. Oklahoma City: Oklahoma Historical Society, (FHL book A3hm.)
  • LeMaster, Arlene, transcriber. Eastern Oklahoma Indians and Pioneers: Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, vol 1. Poteau, Oklahoma: Family Heritage Resources, ( H2La - 3 Vols.)
  • Mason, Alma Burke. Census, Tobucksy County, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory.Copied from Microfilm Roll CTN McAlester, Oklahoma: Pittsburg County Oklahoma Genealogical & Historical Society, no date. (FHL book Cma.)
  • Massey, Lynda and Nash, Clara. Marriages Southern District Oklahoma, Indian Territory, Book 1 , vol 1. McAlester, Oklahoma: Pittsburg County Genealogical & Historical Society, (FHL book V2m; film Item 8.)
  • Matthews, John Joseph. The Osages: Children of the Middle Waters.Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, (FHL book Os1m.)
  • McKim, Sandra. Whites In Skullyville County, Choctaw Nation: Permit Register February 19, ; Choctaw Vol Bowie, MD: Heritage Press, (FHL /S1 R2m.)
  • Mooney, Thomas G. Exploring Your Cherokee Ancestry: A Basic Genealogical Research Guide. 4th printing, Tahlequah, Oklahoma: Cherokee National Historical Society, Inc., (FHL Cmt; film Item 5.)
  • Morris, Jack W; Goins, Charles R; and McReynolds, Edwin C. Historical Atlas of Oklahoma. 2nd ed.; Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, (FHL book E3m.)
  • National Atlas of the United States of America -- Federal Lands and Indian Reservations Available online.
  • Newman, Tillie Karns. The Black Dog Trail. Boston: The Christopher House,
  • Nix, Dorothy J., compiler. Cherokee Nation Marriages in theCooWeeScooWee & Delaware Districts. Vinita, Oklahoma: Craig County Genealogical Society, (FHL book V22m.)
  • Nix, Dorothy J., compiler. Cherokee Nation Marriages 2 Jul May Vinita, Oklahoma: Craig County Genealogical Society, (FHL book Cnd - 7 Vols.)
  • Preliminary Inventory No. Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Washington DC: National Archives and Records Services. Available online
  • Rose, Helen York. I Walked The Footsteps of My Fathers.Ozark, Missouri: Dogwood Printing, (FHL book Y82r; film Item 3.)
  • Schofield, Constance A. Indian Census of the Cherokee Nation: Cooweescoowee District, Delaware District, Saline District. Bluejacket, Oklahoma: no publisher, (FHL book Csc.)
  • Shadburn, Don L. Unhallowed Intrusion: A History of Cherokee Families In Forsyth County, Georgia.Alpharetta, Georgia: WH Wolfe Associates, (FHL book Csu; film Item 5.) Note: Many of these families, or their descendants, came to Indian Territory.
  • Starr, Emmet. Old Cherokee Families (from "History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folk Lore" , pp , chapters xiv through xix) with Index by J.J. Hill. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Foundation, (FHL book Cste; film Item 1.)
  • Swanton John R. The Indian Tribes of North America. Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin # Available online.
  • Tyner, James W. and Timmons, Alice Tyner. Our People and Where They Rest. Norman, Oklahoma: American Indian Institute, (FHL book V3t - 12 Vols Indexed.)
  • United States Dept. of Interior. Comprehensive Management and Use Plan Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.
  • United States Dept. of Interior. Comprehensive Management and Use Plan Trail of Tears National Historic Trail - Map Supplement.
  • American Indians: A Select Catalog of National
  • Archives Microfilm Publications.Washington, D.C.: National Archives, (FHL book Un3a; fiche )
  • Valley, Dorris & Lembcke, Mary M. The Peorias: A History of the Peoria Indian Tribe of Oklahoma. Miami, Oklahoma: The Peoria Indian Tribe of Oklahoma, (FHL book P39p.)
  • Wagner, Rosalie, compiler. Cherokee Nation Census: Index of Persons Living Under PermitIn The Coo-Wee-Scoo-Wee and Delaware Districts.Vinita, Oklahoma: NE Oklahoma Genealogical Society, (FHL book Cwro.)
  • Watson, Irwin Anderson. Old Wetumka Creek Indian Mission Tulsa, Oklahoma: Ms. J Travis Watson,
  • Weaver, Orpha Jewell. Probate Records Northern District Cherokee Nation. Vinita, Oklahoma: NE Oklahoma Genealogical Society, (FHL book W54p.)
  • Weaver, Orpha Jewell. Probate Records Northern District Cherokee Nation. Vinita, Oklahoma: NE Oklahoma Genealogical Society,
  • Wilson, Charles Banks, compiler. Indians of Eastern Oklahoma Including Quapaw Agency Indians Afton, Oklahoma: Buffalo Publishing Company, no date. (FHL book W)
  • Wilson, Terry P. "Osage Indian Women During A Century of Change, " Prologue, Vol. 14 No. 4 (Winter ).
  • Wise, Donald. Way Down Yonder In The Indian Territory. Broken Arrow, Oklahoma: privately published, no date.
  • Witcher, Curt B. and Nixon, George J. "Tracking Native American Family History, In. The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy. Arlene Eakle and Johni Cerny, editors. Salt Lake City: Ancestry,
  • Woodard, Dixie Bogle, compiler. Cherokee Nation Births and Deaths , abstracted from Indian Chieftain. No place: Craig County Oklahoma Genealogical Society,
  • Woodward, Grace Steele. The Cherokees. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press,

Websites
[edit | edit source]

Sours: https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Indigenous_Peoples_of_Oklahoma


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