Calories in 2 eggs

Calories in 2 eggs DEFAULT

Eggs Might Be the Ultimate Weight Management Food

Eggs are among the healthiest foods you can eat.

They are rich in:

  • high-quality protein
  • healthy fats
  • many essential vitamins and minerals

Eggs also have a few unique properties that make them egg-ceptionally weight-loss-friendly.

This article explains why whole eggs are great for weight loss.

Eggs are low in calories

Even though there are many factors that can contribute to weight gain, the most evidence-based way to promote weight loss is to reduce your daily calorie intake or increase the number of calories that you burn.

One large egg contains only about 74 calories, yet it’s very high in nutrients. Egg yolks are especially nutritious ().

An egg meal commonly consists of about 2–4 eggs. Three large boiled eggs contain less than calories.

By adding a generous serving of vegetables, along with a source of fiber and fat like sliced avocado, you’re able to have a complete meal for calories.

Just keep in mind that if you fry your eggs in oil or butter, you add about 50 calories for each teaspoon (5 grams) used.

Summary

One large egg contains about 74 calories. A meal consisting of 3 boiled eggs, vegetables and sliced avocado can contain under calories.

Eggs are very filling

Eggs are incredibly nutrient-dense and filling, mainly because of their high protein content ().

High-protein foods have been known to reduce appetite and increase fullness compared with foods that contain less protein (, , , ).

Studies have repeatedly shown that egg meals, especially when paired with a source of fiber, promote feelings of fullness and reduce food intake during later meals compared with other meals with the same calorie content (, ).

Eggs also rank high on a scale called the satiety index. This scale evaluates how well foods help you feel full and reduce calorie intake later in the day ().

Additionally, consuming a diet high in protein may reduce the desire to eat by 15%. It may also help prevent unhealthy late-night snacking (, ).

Summary

Eggs rank high on the satiety index, which means they may help you feel fuller for longer. High-protein foods, like eggs, may also help you snack less between meals.

Eggs may boost your metabolism

Eggs contain a good balance of all of the essential amino acids that your body needs.

This means your body can easily use the protein in eggs for maintenance and metabolism.

Eating a high-protein diet has been shown to boost metabolism by up to 80– calories a day through a process called the thermic effect of food (, ).

The thermic effect of food is the energy the body requires to metabolize foods, and it’s higher for protein than for fat or carbs (, , ).

This means that high-protein foods, such as eggs, can help you burn more calories to support weight loss.

Summary

A high-protein diet may boost your metabolism by up to 80– calories per day, since extra energy is needed to help metabolize the protein in foods.

Eggs are a great way to start your day

Eating eggs for breakfast seems to be especially beneficial for weight loss.

Many studies have compared the effects of eating eggs in the morning versus eating other breakfasts with the same calorie content.

Some older studies show that eating eggs instead of bagels for breakfast can increase feelings of fullness and reduce the amount of calories consumed at later meals (, ).

Regular consumption of an egg-based breakfast has also been associated with increased weight loss over time ().

According to one study involving adolescents with obesity, eating an egg breakfast increased satiety and reduced lunchtime food intake compared with a breakfast with steamed bread ().

Furthermore, the egg breakfast also increased levels of peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), two hormones that regulate appetite and promote feelings of fullness ().

Another study involving 30 healthy young men compared the effects of three types of breakfasts on three separate occasions. These were eggs on toast, cereal with milk and toast, and a croissant with orange juice ().

Compared with the other two breakfast combinations, the egg breakfast caused significantly greater satiety, less hunger, and a lower desire to eat ().

Furthermore, eating eggs for breakfast caused the men to automatically eat about – calories less at lunch and dinner buffets, compared with the other two breakfasts ().

This impressive reduction in calorie intake was unintentional and did not require any other changes to their diet besides eating eggs for breakfast.

Summary

Eating eggs for breakfast may increase your feeling of fullness and make you automatically eat fewer calories later in the day.

Eggs are cheap and easy to prepare

Incorporating eggs into your diet is very easy.

They are inexpensive, widely available, and can be prepared within minutes.

Eggs are delicious almost every way you make them, but they are most often boiled, scrambled, made into an omelet, or baked.

A breakfast omelet made with a couple of eggs and some vegetables makes for an excellent and quick weight-loss-friendly breakfast.

You can find plenty of low carb breakfast ideas, many of which feature eggs, on this page.

Summary

Eggs are inexpensive, widely available, and easy to prepare.

The bottom line

Adding eggs to your diet may be one of the easiest things to do if you’re trying to lose weight.

They can make you feel more full and help you eat fewer calories throughout the day.

Furthermore, eggs are a great source of many vitamins and minerals that are commonly lacking in the diet.

Eating eggs, especially for breakfast, can be a great addition to a healthy weight loss eating plan.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/eggs-weight-loss-food

How many calories do eggs contain?

Eggs are a good source of protein and contain many key vitamins and minerals, including calcium, potassium, and iron. All of these nutrients are vital components of a person’s diet.

According to the , one large, hard-boiled egg contains around 78 calories.

Eggs were once a controversial choice due to concerns about saturated fats and cholesterol, but researchers have since proved that eggs have a number of dietary benefits.

This article looks at the nutritional profile of eggs, as well as some of the latest research into the risks and benefits associated with eating eggs.

Nutritional profile

One large, hard-boiled egg weighing around 50 grams (g) contains the following nutrients, according to the :

  • Calories: 78
  • Protein: g
  • Total fat: g
  • Carbohydrate: g
  • Dietary fiber: 0 g
  • Sugars: g
  • Calcium: 25 milligrams (mg)
  • Iron: mg
  • Phosphorous: 86 mg
  • Potassium: 63 mg
  • Zinc: mg
  • Cholesterol: mg
  • Folate: 22 micrograms
  • Vitamin A: international units (IU)
  • Vitamin D: 44 IU

However, the way a person cooks an egg slightly alters its nutritional profile. For example, the same 50 g of a whole, scrambled egg has around g of protein and 36 IU of vitamin D, according to the .

Benefits

Eggs have many benefits — they are a good source of protein, fatty acids, choline, and antioxidants. Eggs are also rich in vitamin D, a nutrient that does not occur naturally in many common foods.

Several research studies have tested the nutritional value of eggs as part of the daily diet.

For example, one study in The FASEB Journal included 26 participants, ages 60–75, with obesity. The researchers asked them to eat either an egg based, high fat diet or a carbohydrate based, low fat diet for 8 weeks.

After 8 weeks, the scientists measured the participants’ body fat composition. Those who ate three whole eggs per day in a low carbohydrate diet lost more fat than those who ate a high carbohydrate, low fat diet.

However, it is important to note that the Egg Nutrition Center funded this study.

A meta-analysis in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition examined seven research studies concerning egg consumption, heart disease, and stroke.

The researchers found that eating up to one egg per day helped reduce a person’s risk of stroke, but they did not see an increase or a decrease in the participants’ risk of heart disease.

However, one study in the journal Heart that included data from half a million adults found that eating an average of one egg per day was significantly associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

A study in looked at the effects of a high egg diet versus a low egg diet in people with diabetes. The team defined a high egg diet as eating two eggs per day on 6 days per week and a low egg diet as eating fewer than two eggs per week.

After 3 months, the researchers found that high egg consumption did not affect the cholesterol levels of the participants. They did find, however, that a high egg diet can increase satiety, or feelings of fullness.

Eggs can be a healthful addition to the diet. To reap the nutritional benefits, a person can incorporate them into a variety of meals.

Risks

Previous controversy surrounding eggs and their nutritional value concerned the amount of cholesterol in egg yolk. According to the , one large egg contains around mg of cholesterol.

However, the secretaries of the US Department of Health and Human Services and the USDA removed the recommended daily limit for cholesterol in

This followed recommendations from dietary advisory committees, which noted that research has not shown that dietary cholesterol — in foods such as eggs — poses a danger to heart health or cholesterol levels in the body.

Most recently, a study in the journal Nutrients found evidence to support the omission, concluding that eating eggs is not associated with excess cholesterol levels in the body. The results are based on the Hellenic National and Nutrition Health Survey, which asked more than 3, participants questions about their dietary habits.

If a person typically has a healthful diet and is mindful of their total daily intake of foods high in saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol, eating cooked, whole eggs is unlikely to harm their health.

A bigger concern regarding egg consumption is that allergies are common, especially among children. In fact, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, around 2% of children are allergic to eggs.

Although many outgrow this allergy by the age of 16, some people experience reactions so severe that they cause difficulty breathing.

Some symptoms associated with an egg allergy include:

  • coughing
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • a feeling of tightness in the throat
  • stomach cramping
  • swelling of the lips and tongue

If a person suspects that they or someone they know is having an allergic reaction to eggs, they should seek medical aid.

People with severe egg allergies may need to carry an epinephrine injector pen to treat the symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction.

Adding eggs to the diet

A person can incorporate eggs into their diet in a variety of ways, such as by:

  • boiling, poaching, or scrambling the eggs
  • making omelets or quiches that contain eggs or egg whites as well as vegetables and lean meats
  • incorporating eggs into casseroles and adding vegetables or lean meats
  • adding a boiled egg to a salad or having one as a snack

Eating hard-boiled, poached, or scrambled eggs can be very nutritious. To ensure that the eggs are a healthful addition, refrain from cooking them in butter or high fat oils.

Summary

Eggs can be a healthful addition to any meal, or they can serve as a snack. A large, hard-boiled egg contains only 78 calories, as well as protein and vital nutrients, such as vitamin D.

Although nutrition experts have expressed some concern surrounding eggs’ cholesterol content, most current research suggests that eggs do not adversely affect people’s cholesterol levels.

Anyone who has concerns about egg consumption, however, should speak with a doctor.

Sours: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/
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Calories in 2 Eggs


Other User Submitted Calorie Info Matching: 2 Eggs

Eggs Better'N Eggs Liquid Eggs 1/4 Cup (1 serving)

Calories: 0, Fat: 0g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 0g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Eggs Better'N Eggs Liquid Eggs 1/4 Cup

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
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  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
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  • Cholesterol mg
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  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
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Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs (1 serving)

Calories: , Fat: 0g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 0g

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Calories in Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
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  • Total Fat g
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  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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Chocolate Eggs - Minichick Solid Eggs (8 Eggs) (1 gram)

Calories: 5, Fat: 0g, Carbs: 1g, Protein: 0g

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Calories in Chocolate Eggs - Minichick Solid Eggs (8 Eggs)

Serving Size: 1 gram

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories
  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat g
  • Monounsaturated Fat g
  • Cholesterol mg
  • Sodium mg
  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
  • Vitamin B %
  • Vitamin B-6 %
  • Vitamin C %
  • Vitamin D %
  • Vitamin E %
  • Calcium %
  • Copper %
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Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs (1 serving)

Calories: , Fat: 0g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 0g

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Calories in Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories
  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat g
  • Monounsaturated Fat g
  • Cholesterol mg
  • Sodium mg
  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
  • Vitamin B %
  • Vitamin B-6 %
  • Vitamin C %
  • Vitamin D %
  • Vitamin E %
  • Calcium %
  • Copper %
  • Folate %
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  • Thiamin %
  • Zinc %
Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs (1 serving)

Calories: , Fat: 0g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 0g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories
  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat g
  • Monounsaturated Fat g
  • Cholesterol mg
  • Sodium mg
  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
  • Vitamin B %
  • Vitamin B-6 %
  • Vitamin C %
  • Vitamin D %
  • Vitamin E %
  • Calcium %
  • Copper %
  • Folate %
  • Iron %
  • Magnesium %
  • Manganese %
  • Niacin %
  • Pantothenic Acid %
  • Phosphorus %
  • Riboflavin %
  • Selenium %
  • Thiamin %
  • Zinc %
Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs (1 serving)

Calories: , Fat: 0g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 0g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories
  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat g
  • Monounsaturated Fat g
  • Cholesterol mg
  • Sodium mg
  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
  • Vitamin B %
  • Vitamin B-6 %
  • Vitamin C %
  • Vitamin D %
  • Vitamin E %
  • Calcium %
  • Copper %
  • Folate %
  • Iron %
  • Magnesium %
  • Manganese %
  • Niacin %
  • Pantothenic Acid %
  • Phosphorus %
  • Riboflavin %
  • Selenium %
  • Thiamin %
  • Zinc %
Chocolate Eggs - Minichick Solid Eggs (8 Eggs) (1 gram)

Calories: 5, Fat: 0g, Carbs: 1g, Protein: 0g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Chocolate Eggs - Minichick Solid Eggs (8 Eggs)

Serving Size: 1 gram

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories
  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat g
  • Monounsaturated Fat g
  • Cholesterol mg
  • Sodium mg
  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
  • Vitamin B %
  • Vitamin B-6 %
  • Vitamin C %
  • Vitamin D %
  • Vitamin E %
  • Calcium %
  • Copper %
  • Folate %
  • Iron %
  • Magnesium %
  • Manganese %
  • Niacin %
  • Pantothenic Acid %
  • Phosphorus %
  • Riboflavin %
  • Selenium %
  • Thiamin %
  • Zinc %
Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs (1 serving)

Calories: , Fat: 0g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 0g

Show full nutrition information

Nutrition Facts

Calories in Hiding Eggs, Marshmallow Eggs, 1 Serv. 2 Eggs

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories
  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat g
  • Monounsaturated Fat g
  • Cholesterol mg
  • Sodium mg
  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
  • Vitamin B %
  • Vitamin B-6 %
  • Vitamin C %
  • Vitamin D %
  • Vitamin E %
  • Calcium %
  • Copper %
  • Folate %
  • Iron %
  • Magnesium %
  • Manganese %
  • Niacin %
  • Pantothenic Acid %
  • Phosphorus %
  • Riboflavin %
  • Selenium %
  • Thiamin %
  • Zinc %
Cadbury, Easter Eggs Bag, Mini Eggs, Dairy Milk, Solid Eggs (1 Egg) (1 serving)

Calories: 35, Fat: 2g, Carbs: 4g, Protein: 1g

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Nutrition Facts

Calories in Cadbury, Easter Eggs Bag, Mini Eggs, Dairy Milk, Solid Eggs (1 Egg)

Serving Size: 1 serving

  • Amount Per Serving
  • Calories
  • Total Fat g
  • Saturated Fat g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat g
  • Monounsaturated Fat g
  • Cholesterol mg
  • Sodium mg
  • Potassium mg
  • Total Carbohydrate g
  • Dietary Fiber g
  • Sugars g
  • Protein g

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2, calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

  • Vitamin A %
  • Vitamin B %
  • Vitamin B-6 %
  • Vitamin C %
  • Vitamin D %
  • Vitamin E %
  • Calcium %
  • Copper %
  • Folate %
  • Iron %
  • Magnesium %
  • Manganese %
  • Niacin %
  • Pantothenic Acid %
  • Phosphorus %
  • Riboflavin %
  • Selenium %
  • Thiamin %
  • Zinc %

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Eggs For Weight Loss - How Many in a Day - Benefits - Eggs White vs Yolk - Brown vs White Eggs
egg-containing-calories.jpg

There are on average between 55 and 80 calories in an egg depending on its size. For details of all sizes see below.

How many calories are there in an egg?

The calories in an egg will vary depending on the size and how it is prepared. However, on average a single medium-sized egg will contain around 66 calories, an average small egg will contain around 55 calories and an average large egg around 80 calories.

Most of these calories come from the yolk, which is the particularly nutrient dense part of the egg and includes many essential vitamins and minerals. Below is a list of full calorie values in various sizes of an egg.

Nutrition information

Per small egg (48g)

Per medium size egg (58g)

Per large egg (68g)

Per very large egg (78g)

Per g

Energy kcal(calories)

54

66

78

90

Energy kJ

Calories in cooked eggs

Scrambled eggs

Two scrambled eggs cooked in the microwave with a little salt and pepper and a dash of semi-skimmed milk will provide around calories. If you are cooking your scrambled eggs using the pan method, two large eggs with a dash of semi-skimmed milk scrambled with a small knob of butter will total between and calories depending on the amount of butter added.

Poached eggs are very popular as they don’t need you to add any extra cooking oil or butter to cook. This means poached egg calories equal the same as in the table above – between 54 and 80 calories depending on the size.

The calorie value of a fried egg will differ depending on the type of fat used in the pan and whether you drain it. It is often recommended to use oils which are rich in monounsaturates such as rapeseed or olive oil. A fried egg can range from 85 calories if using only a little spray-oil, to around calories if frying in oil and not draining it.

Calories in popular egg dishes

Egg dish

Calories

Protein (g)

Carbohydrate (g)

Fat (g)

One boiled egg, 2 slices toast + 10g margarine

15

31

17

Two egg plain omelette, g potatoes

19

35

14

Two scrambled eggs, 1 toasted bagel (60g)

20

35

14

Eggs and dieting

Eggs are a great food to include in your diet if you’re trying to lose weight whilst ensuring your body gets all the essential nutrition it needs. Because eggs are nutritionally dense and contain fewer than 70 calories (medium-sized) they can be part of any calorie-controlled meals and snacks whilst still providing lots of protein and vital vitamins, minerals and fats.

The way you prepare your eggs will of course affect their nutritional value. For instance, if you fry an egg in fat, instead of boiling it, this will increase the number of overall calories. It is also important to eat your eggs along with other nutrient-rich foods, such as vegetables, salads and whole grains.

More information about eggs and nutrition

If you are interested in eggs and dieting, visit our section on eggs and weight loss

For more information on eggs and health, visit our health section or nutritional information page for more details on calories, fats and carbohydrates.

All information checked by an independent Registered Nutritionist/Dietitian

Sours: https://www.egginfo.co.uk/egg-nutrition-and-health/egg-nutrition-information/calories-in-an-egg

2 eggs in calories

Hard-Boiled Egg Nutrition Facts: Calories, Protein and More

Eggs are a protein and nutrient powerhouse.

They can be added to many dishes and prepared in numerous ways.

One way to enjoy eggs is to hard-boil them. Hard-boiled eggs make great salad toppings and can be eaten alone with a sprinkle of salt and pepper.

Here is everything you need to know about hard-boiled eggs.

Nutrition Facts

Hard-boiled eggs are loaded with nutrients, protein and healthy fats. One large hard-boiled egg (50 grams) provides (1):

  • Calories: 77
  • Carbs: grams
  • Total fat: grams
  • Saturated fat: grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: grams
  • Cholesterol: mg
  • Protein: grams
  • Vitamin A: 6% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)
  • Vitamin B2 (riboflavin): 15% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B12 (cobalamin): 9% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid): 7% of the RDA
  • Phosphorus: 86 mg, or 9% of the RDA
  • Selenium: mcg, or 22% of the RDA

For all the nutrients eggs have to offer, they are a fairly low-calorie food. Hard-boiled eggs provide only 77 calories, 5 grams of fat and a very small amount of carbs.

They’re also a very good source of lean protein, at about 6 grams per egg.

Furthermore, eggs pack a complete range of amino acids, which means they are a complete protein source.

Hard-boiled eggs also offer various important nutrients, including vitamin D, zinc, calcium and all of the B vitamins. They’re a particularly good source of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and vitamin B

Many of eggs’ nutrients reside exclusively in the yolk, whereas the egg white contains primarily protein ().

Summary

Hard-boiled eggs are low in calories and rich in many important vitamins, minerals and nutrients. While the yolk provides nutrients, fat and protein, the white is almost exclusively protein.

An Excellent Source of High-Quality Protein

Protein is vital for many components of your health, including building muscle and bones and producing hormones and enzymes ().

Eggs provide about 6 grams of high-quality protein. In fact, eggs are one of the best sources of protein you can eat (1).

This is due to their complete protein profile — eggs contain all nine essential amino acids (, ).

One common misconception is that the protein is found only in the egg white.

However, almost half of an egg’s protein content comes from the yolk (5, ).

Therefore, it’s best to enjoy the whole egg — yolk and all — to benefit from the protein and nutrients eggs have to offer.

Summary

Eggs are an excellent source of protein. They contain all nine essential amino acids, and both the white and yolk contain this important nutrient.

High in Cholesterol but Don’t Increase Heart Disease Risk

Over the years, eggs have gotten a bad reputation due to their high cholesterol content.

It’s true that eggs are packed with cholesterol. One large hard-boiled egg provides mg of cholesterol, which is 71% of the RDA (1).

However, recent research shows that dietary cholesterol has very little effect on blood cholesterol (, ).

For most people, dietary cholesterol is not associated with heart disease risk and does not increase total cholesterol or “bad” LDL cholesterol levels (, ).

In fact, egg consumption may improve “good” HDL cholesterol (, , ).

Additionally, two studies in over , healthy adults found that eating one whole egg per day was not linked to an increased risk of heart disease ().

However, people with diabetes should exercise caution when consuming eggs, as some research indicates that eating 7 eggs per week may increase their risk of heart disease ().

Ultimately, more research is needed on the link between egg consumption and heart disease risk in people with diabetes.

Summary

Though hard-boiled eggs are high in cholesterol, studies show that dietary cholesterol does not negatively impact blood cholesterol in most people. In fact, eggs have been found to improve cholesterol profiles by increasing “good” HDL cholesterol.

Promote Brain and Eye Health

Eggs provide important essential nutrients and antioxidants that support brain and eye health.

Choline

Choline is an essential nutrient for many critical processes in your body.

Your body does produce some choline on its own, but not in large quantities. Therefore, you must get choline from your diet in order to avoid deficiency ().

Yet, most Americans aren’t consuming enough (, ).

Choline is crucial for maintaining a healthy nervous system, as it helps produce acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in memory and learning ().

Choline is important across your lifespan. It promotes fetal brain and memory development, as well as cognitive function in older adults (, ).

It’s also vital for pregnant women, as adequate choline levels may decrease the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus ().

Choline is found in the yolk — one, large, hard-boiled egg contains mg of choline, which is 27% of the daily value. In fact, eggs are the most concentrated source of choline in the American diet (, ).

Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Lutein and zeaxanthin are two antioxidants best known for their role in eye health.

They combat harmful, oxygen-induced free radicals that can accumulate in your eyes (, ).

Lutein and zeaxanthin have been shown to slow the formation of cataracts and protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (, ).

They may even protect your eyes from detrimental blue light (,).

Egg yolks are an excellent source of these two carotenoids.

Furthermore, due to the yolk’s fat profile, your body appears to absorb the lutein and zeaxanthin very well (, ).

Summary

Egg yolks are an excellent source of choline, which is essential for brain health and development. They’re also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants that promote eye health.

Hard-Boiled vs Fried

Hard-boiled eggs are made by placing unshelled eggs in a saucepan filled with cold water, then boiling until the yolk solidifies. They’re cooked without any additional butter or oil.

On the other hand, fried eggs require supplemental butter or oil, which contribute additional calories and fat.

For example, one large hard-boiled egg has 77 calories and grams of fat, compared to 90 calories and 7 grams of fat in one large fried egg (1, 28).

Other than the fat and calorie content, hard-boiled and fried eggs have very similar vitamin and mineral profiles. They don’t differ in their amount of protein and nutrients.

Summary

While hard-boiled eggs are prepared without further ingredients, fried eggs require additional butter or oil — which make them higher in calories. However, fried and boiled eggs are very similar from a micronutrient standpoint.

The Bottom Line

Hard-boiled eggs are a low-calorie, nutrient-dense food.

They’re an excellent source of high-quality protein and rich in B vitamins, zinc, calcium and other important nutrients and antioxidants like choline, lutein and zeaxanthin.

Though high in cholesterol, eggs don’t appear to increase heart disease risk in most people.

Hard-boiled eggs are prepared without additional oil or butter, so they’re lower in calories and fat than fried eggs.

They may just be one of the easiest and most nutritious additions to your diet.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/boiled-egg-nutrition
✅ How Many Calories In A Boiled Egg

Egg (Whole)

Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving

Calories

 

% Daily Values*

Total Fat

g

13%

Saturated Fat

g

15%

Trans Fat

-

Polyunsaturated Fat

g

Monounsaturated Fat

g

Cholesterol

mg

%

Sodium

mg

6%

Total Carbohydrate

g

0%

Dietary Fiber

0g

0%

Sugars

g

Protein

g

Vitamin D

1mcg

4%

Calcium

53mg

4%

Iron

mg

10%

Potassium

mg

3%

Vitamin A

mcg

16%

Vitamin C

0mg

0%

7%

of RDI*

( calories)

7% of RDI

Calorie Breakdown:

 

Carbohydrate (2%)

 

Fat (63%)

 

Protein (35%)

Photos

Nutrition summary:

Calories

Fat

g

Carbs

g

Protein

g

There are calories in 2 large Eggs (Whole).
Calorie breakdown: 63% fat, 2% carbs, 35% protein.

Other Common Serving Sizes:

Related Types of Eggs:

See Also:

Used in these Member Recipes:

Sours: https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/usda/egg-(whole)?portionid=&portionamount=

Now discussing:

An average-size egg contains 74 calories, or kJ. This is the egg size found in the gram cartons that most people buy. 

An average size egg from a gram carton contains kilojoules. However, the exact number of kilojoules depends on the size of the egg.

An average serving size of two eggs contains only calories or kilojoules – roughly the same as two apples.

The white of a 60 gram egg contains about 17 calories.

A 60g boiled egg contains only 74 calories or kJ.

A typical 60g poached egg contains 74 calories or kJ.

The number of calories in fried eggs depends on the amount and type of oil, butter or margarine (if any) that is used in the frypan. Generally, using oil, butter or margarine will result in a fried egg having more calories than a boiled or poached egg.

Scrambled eggs are one of the easiest and tastiest dishes to make but they are likely to contain more calories than boiled or poached eggs as recipes typically call on milk and butter.

Sours: https://www.australianeggs.org.au/


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