East village san diego crime

East village san diego crime DEFAULT

5 Reasons East Village Downtown San Diego is a Great Place to Live in 2021

Those looking to be a part of a large urban community with plenty of nightlife should seriously consider looking into East Village in San Diego.

East Village is Downtown San Diego's largest neighborhood as it consists of 130 blocks. It is known for its vibe for excitement with cafes, boutiques, art galleries, rooftop bars and live music venues.

Geographically, East Village lies between Seventh Avenue east to 18th Street.

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History of East Village

East Village was once a warehouse district downtown with a lot of vacant lots. Warehouses and businesses started shutting down and it became a heavily blighted area. Artists and social services were the first to move into the area in the 1990's and it slowly began to change, but was still known for its dive bars and criminal activity.

Revitalization efforts went full force with the construction of Petco Park, a high-tech baseball stadium that hosts the San Diego Padres. It opened in 2004 and that gave way to many other businesses taking a chance on the area. Now East Village is a cultural hotspot for entertainment day and night with more than 700 businesses. Residential efforts also began after Petco Park opened with development beginning in 2005.

This is a heavily commercial area with five major luxury hotels, including the Hilton San Diego Bayfront, the Andaz San Diego, the Omni San Diego Hotel, the San Diego Marriott Gaslamp Quarter and the Hotel Solamar San Diego.

The East Village Association, a nonprofit, is an organization active in the area. Its mission is the promote East Village businesses and promote the neighborhood. Business owners in the neighborhood are automatic members.

East Village is called a livable urban village with more than 10,000 living there now. It is transitioning from an arts and industrial neighborhood to a mix-use area of 30,000 residents and more than 800 businesses over the next 10 years. It is heavy into entrepreneurism and that is displayed in the area's arts, education, entertainment and culture.

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The vibe in East Village is hip urban and most residences are apartments, although there is ongoing construction of luxury condos as well. One of the cooler aspects of this area is that some of the old warehouses were converted into mixed-use residential units.

Units are priced anywhere from $285,000 for a one-bath, one-bedroom to $950,000 for a two bath, two bedroom condo. There are a number of new apartments coming on the market that will hit the $310,000 price point. The average price of apartments in the area is around the upper $300's.

Here's a quick rundown of our list:

Reason 1 - More Residences Are Being Built.

With highly anticipated growth, there are many new projects going on that amount to thousands of homes, as well as office and retail space. A 40-story apartment development proposal was made public last March. It will be a 613-unit complex that includes three buildings. One is six stories and the second is seven stories. The third building is a 400-foot tower.

The buildings will be at the corner of Park Boulevard and Broadway. They are designed with green space between the buildings for residents to enjoy.

See the latest East Village homes, townhomes, and condos for sale here…

Reason 2 - It's Close to The Gaslamp Quarter

The East Village neighborhood is a little more than a half mile from the Gaslamp Quarter. It takes less than six minutes to get there from most areas of East Village. There is heavy traffic, but that only amounts to a four minute delay.

The Gaslamp Quarter lures millions of tourists and locals with its nightlife and entertainment. Its claim to fame is that it was the home of famous Wild West gunman Wyatt Earp. It has an old-fashioned 19th century vibe mixed with modern entertainment and music.

East Village Homeowners: We have qualified buyers desperately seeking to buy immediately and pay top dollar…

Reason 3 - It Has a Lot of Live Music

There are many venues in the area that have live music. That includes the Saville Theater, which is known for its jazz concerts. It also has theater productions and other types of music. Another spot is also Moonshine Flats, located at 344 7th Ave., that features country music in its bar. It has honky ton and a backyard bar and restaurant.

The SoCal Music Festival is also in the East Village. While the name a bit generic, the festival is not. It has four stages full of bands that will fill every music vibe anyone can have. Most people who have never been are pleasantly surprised at the quality of the festival and the bands.

Be an expert on East Village real estate – see all active, pending, and sold listings within the last 3 years now…

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Reason 4 - It Is A Thriving Area With Lots Of Opportunities.

Growth continues to come to this area and most say the greatest growth is coming over the next few years. One of the most anticipated projects is the Harbor Drive Pedestrian Bridge. The bridge will connect Balboa Park with San Diego Bay, making the area more walkable and bringing more people from those areas into East Village.

One new venture that has everyone talking is the San Diego Museum of Beer opening in East Village. The museum goes all out to promote the city's craft beer industry. Plans are still brewing for which of three East Village locations will be the site for the concept, but a 2020 opening is planned. It will include a 12,000-plus square-foot museum that will cost around $2 million.

See the best purchase loans in San Diego...

Reason 5 - Education Is Important.

The neighborhood includes two schools and both have high ranks for excellent. San Diego Early/Middle College School has 109 students. There are also two high schools in the neighborhood.

There is also education for adults with San Diego City College and the New School of Architecture. The Thomas Jefferson School of Law is under construction. The Central Library is also located there. This $185 million project opened in 2013. The library, located at 330 Park Blvd, features several floors of innovative learning and is open seven days a week. It has an innovation lab, the Sullivan Family Baseball Research Center, a rare book room and an Idea Lab among other things.

Is the 2021 San Diego housing market like 2007?

The East Village is not only the central location of the city, but is the centerpiece for all that is going on in San Diego. If culture, nightlife, learning and living the modern, urban life is important to you, there is no better place to settle in that East Village.

If you want more information on East Village, or any other neighborhood, I would love to help!

I like to answer people's questions and help them find the right place to live.

Leave me a comment below – or, contact me here. 

Your East Village Insider, 

Scott

Sours: https://www.sandiegorealestatehunter.com/blog/5-reasons-east-village-san-diego-great-place-live/

Recent violent and random attacks by homeless people on unsuspecting San Diegans have some calling on the city and police to do more to keep streets safe.

“Walking through America’s Finest City shouldn’t feel like you’re in the Walking Dead,” says Aislinn Fava.

The sidewalk outside her building is as far as the petite 31-year-old has made it outside her apartment alone since she was attacked three weeks ago.

“I used to feel kind of invincible,” Fava said. “And I felt really safe in San Diego and never thought anything like this could happen. Ever. And that completely changed on that day.”

Fava was walking along Broadway between 4th 3rd avenues to grab a smoothie in the middle of the afternoon when a homeless man ran up from behind her and punched her in the back of the head, slamming her into the ground. She said he punched her a second time and tried to steal her purse before police arrested him. Giovanni Moore, 31, is now in jail and facing criminal charges for battery and robbery.

“The thing that really freaks me out the most is that there really wasn’t anything I could do to prevent it,” Fava said. “I couldn’t have seen in coming. I didn’t exchange words with this guy. Nothing. It was so bizarre, so random, that’s kind of the freakiest part.”

Fava shared her experience on social media and the comments came flooding in. Below are just a few examples:

“…East village is a war zone for women. I had an incident near Albertsons last year. I pepper sprayed him to get him off of me…”

“…I work on India St and I have seen so much aggressive behavior from them such as dancing with a knife and wielding it at people…”

“…I had a homeless woman charge at me, screaming obscenities..."

The same week of Fava's attack, a City Heights surveillance camera captured the moment a homeless man struck another man from behind with a skateboard. Police say the suspect did it again to another random victim just minutes later.

NBC 7's Dave Summers shares surveillance footage from one of the attacks.

"We have an uptick in violent crime in general,” Mayor Todd Gloria told NBC7. “And being homeless is not a crime, but being homeless is not a get out of jail free card either."

Gloria acknowledges there has been an increase in people living on the streets over the last year.

"A lot of that has to do with the fact that during the pandemic we had to enforce social distancing rules in our homeless shelters,” said Gloria. “That meant that literally hundreds of our beds have not been able to be occupied."

Those same public health orders compelled the jail to release low-level offenders, and some repeat offenders were sent right back to the streets.

But in the last two weeks alone, Gloria said the city has sheltered over 300 people now that social distancing rules have relaxed. In March, the city launched a new street outreach team with mental health counselors and housing workers.           

Gloria said those outreach workers track everyone they interact with into a database. So far, he said it's yielding results.

"For those individuals who raise up the issue of homelessness as a concern, I'd ask them to be a part of the solution," Gloria said. "I'd ask them to participate in the efforts. We have to build more housing. We need to have more shelter beds. That's something communities often struggle with accepting."

Fava just hopes to see changes soon - saying for many living downtown, dodging human feces while walking your dog or constantly fearing an attack from a stranger is now a daily routine.

“This dysfunction has become the norm and it’s really unacceptable,” Fava said.

NBC 7 asked SDPD for the percentage of violent suspects that are homeless, but we were told that is something neither police nor the city is keeping track of.

In the city's latest proposed budget, Gloria allocated an extra $10 million towards creating more shelter beds and intermediate housing, particularly for those struggling with mental illness and substance abuse.

Sours: https://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/victims-of-random-attacks-by-homeless-want-city-police-to-do-more/2658422/
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East Village Residents Say Homelessness There Is Less Visible But in Some Ways, Far Worse

In East Village and along the fringes of Barrio Logan, Sherman Heights and Logan Heights, the center of San Diego’s homeless crisis has changed a lot more than a year after a hepatitis A outbreak inspired dramatic city action.

The tent villages are gone.

But it is still bleak. What was once a concentrated city within a city is now a patchwork of mostly clean streets interspersed with misery, filth and drugs.

On one block considered San Diego’s skid row, drug crime is more exposed than ever – with open drug use and deals. The tents and more stable homeless San Diegans seem to have moved elsewhere, leaving behind those with more visible struggles.

On other blocks, there are luxury apartments, restaurants and community centers. Some areas once teeming with homeless San Diegans – such as Fault Line Park in East Village – are now quieter with hints of the homeless crisis.

The reality can change by the day and often shifts along with police enforcement. Perspectives on the state of the crisis vary widely too.

Several residents, business owners and community leaders tell Voice of San Diego they are exhausted by a series of city decisions – past and present – they believe solidified the neighborhood’s place as a village of homelessness. In some areas, residents say drug activity has gotten worse, making some of their homeless neighbors more hostile and unpredictable.

Others suggest the areas’ challenges have improved since the hepatitis A outbreak. A downtown business group’s monthly counts show the number of homeless San Diegans living on East Village streets has dropped 44 percent since the height of the hepatitis A outbreak.

The mayor’s team and police officials often point to a dramatic reduction in near-permanent camps and the increased public safety and cleaning services they have deployed in the area. Police say they try to respond to complaints and to clear camps before they build up again. But the police and mayor’s staff have also admitted the area is dangerous. They recently weathered criticism that they may have disrupted the region’s annual homelessness count when they stepped up arrests after tents built up during January rainstorms.

East Village resident David Gapp, who regularly walks with his wife to volunteer in Sherman Heights, said there’s been a reduction in tents and shopping carts on city sidewalks.

“I really feel things are much better than a year and a half ago,” Gapp said.

Others are wary.

“You realize at every moment something could go really wrong,” said Rev. John Auther, pastor at Our Lady of Guadalupe, a Catholic church blocks from both the storage center and 17th Street, often dubbed San Diego’s skid row.

During a walk around his grounds late last month, Auther recounted attempts to steal from the church’s outdoor donation boxes, how funeral attendees recently stepped over feces in a church lot and the decision to hire security for the school – a move Auther said hadn’t been necessary during past gang wars in the neighborhood.

And in January, Auther said, someone stole copper pipes from a church-owned apartment that parishioners are working to convert into a temporary home for homeless families.

“It’s constant,” Auther said.

♦♦♦

In August 2017, tents dominated sidewalks in the area where East Village, Barrio Logan, Logan Heights and Sherman Heights converge.

Then, amid a rapidly escalating hepatitis A outbreak, the city scrambled in September 2017 to clear and disinfect city sidewalks.

Mayor Kevin Faulconer also said the city would offer additional services to homeless San Diegans. The area got two new shelters and a storage center where homeless San Diegans can store their belongings. Family Health Centers of San Diego will open a homeless service hub this spring.

Auther has been one of a slew of residents speaking out against those plans. For years, the area has been the countywide hub for homeless shelters and other aid. That is a major reason why homeless San Diegans gather in the area.

But the new storage center allowed the city to revise a key legal settlement, paving the way for what police have said is a game-changer in the city’s efforts to keep homeless camps from building up again. The change has allowed city workers to give homeless San Diegans three hours’ notice – down from 72 hours – before conducting sweeps of homeless camps if there is space at the storage center.

“That is what allows us to keep the street clean,” said police Capt. Scott Wahl, who leads the city’s Neighborhood Policing Division, which focuses on quality-of-life crimes.

The new rule, coupled with continuous police enforcement, has meant far fewer tents.

For homeless San Diegans, the increased enforcement came with a cost.

Latoshia Hardnett, who settled in East Village in 2017 after being released from prison, said police are now quick to react when tents go up. She no longer has one but she said police are still quick to crack down on her and others staying on the streets.

“Police mess with you all the time,” said Hardnett, who recalled a less aggressive approach in years’ past.

Yet the number of homeless San Diegans in the area seems to be rising again, she said.

Homeless San Diegans often wander into the street as cars come off the freeway onto 17th Street and Imperial Avenue and in recent days, dozens of people have milled in several surrounding blocks during the day and at night. Urine stains and human feces are common on sidewalks.

More homeless people living in cars also seem to be parking in the area following a City Council vote to repeal a ban on vehicle habitation.

But what alarms some residents and business owners more, they say, is an uptick in open drug use and sales.

On Friday afternoon on 17th Street, an area cleared during the hepatitis A outbreak, at least two people smoked crack on the sidewalk and two men exchanged cash and heroin. Others nodded off, fresh from a hit.

Many tell stories of watching people smoke crack and shoot heroin in broad daylight on a daily basis.

“They have no fear of anything,” said East Village resident Eva Lee, a hairdresser who said she carries a pocket knife and pepper spray to protect herself.

Wahl and Capt. Mike Holden, who oversees the police department’s central division, say police have tried to curtail drug activity and quality-of-life crimes in the area. They expect to rack up $2 million in overtime charges this year to deliver on promises of increased patrols following the opening of the storage center.

During a month-long operation in East Village last August, police arrested 48 people for drug sales alone.

Wahl said the police department’s homeless outreach team and homeless-serving nonprofits also partnered during the effort to offer shelter and other aid to hundreds of homeless San Diegans.

Police acknowledge enforcement efforts rarely have a lasting impact.

When one drug dealer is arrested, Holden said, another quickly materializes and those who are arrested often soon return.

“It’s frustrating for us to see people we’re arresting for selling drugs back out in a few days, arresting people over and over again,” Holden said.

And police have made many arrests. Data provided after a public records request shows drug-related arrests spiked by more than a third in East Village and Sherman Heights from 2017 to 2018.

Despite outcry and a legal challenge from advocates, police have also continued to use laws that bar blocking city sidewalks with trash bins or erecting a tent to try to keep homeless San Diegans from establishing tent villages. Those homeless San Diegans often return days later or simply move a few blocks away.

Longtime Logan Heights activist Connie Zuniga, who fought the mayor’s storage center proposal, said she has appreciated the police department’s stepped-up response. She just doesn’t believe police have the resources to combat the area’s challenges.

“It has made all the difference in the world,” Zuniga said. “They just have a job they can’t do.”

Homeless San Diegans have been affected by the changes in the area too.

Stephen French, who has recently settled near the Imperial Avenue underpass, said he moved to the neighborhood about three months ago after living on the street in other areas for years. French said he’s been surprised by both the volume of open drug use and mental-health challenges.

“I’ve never heard so many people talking to themselves in my life,” French said.

Derek Williams, who initially lived on East Village streets after falling into homelessness in 2016, said he and his wife eventually found it too chaotic and moved elsewhere. Williams said they tired of intense early morning police enforcement and thefts among the homeless population.

Williams still regularly visits East Village to meet friends or attend practice with the Voices of Our City Choir and when he does, he said, he’s hounded by drug dealers.

“You really can’t walk through there without people asking you for something or wanting you to buy something,” Williams said. “It’s inconvenient and frustrating.”

Yet the pull remains for many homeless San Diegans for another reason: East Village and now Barrio Logan and Sherman Heights are places where they can access services. They count on free meals in East Village, check into the homeless tent in Barrio Logan or store their belongings in Sherman Heights.

“You go to other places and you’re not gonna have food as much,” said Sean Davis, who said he has bounced on and off the streets of East Village over the past six months.

City Council members Vivian Moreno and Chris Ward, who represent the Barrio Logan and East Village neighborhoods, and Greg Block, a spokesman for Faulconer, say they are aware of the strain that homelessness and drug activity have put on the neighborhoods.

Ward, who also chairs the countywide Regional Task Force on the Homeless, said he supports aggressive police efforts to address drug issues and has continued to urge investments in homeless-serving programs, outreach and housing across the city.

“We have to actually serve homeless people in other communities,” said Ward, who last year successfully pushed a resolution to build supportive housing facilities in every Council district.

Still, Ward said, homeless services remain in the East Village, Sherman Heights and Barrio Logan neighborhoods because many homeless San Diegans live there.

Block said city officials are now seeking out locations in other neighborhoods for safe parking lots and homeless storage but defended the city’s decision to add additional services in the eastern reaches of downtown. He said the city is serving homeless San Diegans where they are, and that police and cleaning crews have mobilized to respond to the neighborhoods’ concerns.

“We believe that what we’re doing is the right thing and that we’re helping a lot of people with the things that we’re doing,” Block said. “We can always do more and do better.”

Andrew Keatts contributed to this report.

Written By

Lisa Halverstadt

Lisa Halverstadt writes about San Diego city and county governments. She welcomes story tips and questions. Contact her directly at [email protected] or 619.325.0528.

Sours: https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/news/east-village-residents-say-homelessness-there-is-less-visible-but-in-some-ways-far-worse/
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Old08-02-2007, 02:13 PM
 

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We moved to San Diego a year ago, and chose an apartment in Mission Valley because it was centrally located. We'd like to move (still renting, while we watch the market) to somewhere with a little more character.

I work in Mira Mesa, and my husband works out of the home. We don't have kids, and we'd like to live somewhere that has things (restaurants, shops, coffee, etc.) within easy walking distance. We'd also like to take some art classes, browse galleries, etc. on weekends. We can afford a decent rent for about 1200 sf (~$2300) and I'd like to find someplace a little funky like a loft or an old 1920's house.

We're looking at a loft in east village this weekend, and I wanted to see how that neighborhood is for crime. I'd like to be able to go to restaurants or coffee shops at night without being worried about being on the street past a certain hour. The loft is really nice but pretty expensive, and on the ground floor, which also makes me a little leery, depending on the neighborhood.

Are there any other neighborhoods that would be good choices? Are there good places to look online besides craigslist?

Thanks for any help you can provide!
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Old08-02-2007, 03:18 PM
 

8,784 posts, read 28,050,202 times

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Quote:

Originally Posted by GamerGirlView Post
We moved to San Diego a year ago, and chose an apartment in Mission Valley because it was centrally located. We'd like to move (still renting, while we watch the market) to somewhere with a little more character.

I work in Mira Mesa, and my husband works out of the home. We don't have kids, and we'd like to live somewhere that has things (restaurants, shops, coffee, etc.) within easy walking distance. We'd also like to take some art classes, browse galleries, etc. on weekends. We can afford a decent rent for about 1200 sf (~$2300) and I'd like to find someplace a little funky like a loft or an old 1920's house.

We're looking at a loft in east village this weekend, and I wanted to see how that neighborhood is for crime. I'd like to be able to go to restaurants or coffee shops at night without being worried about being on the street past a certain hour. The loft is really nice but pretty expensive, and on the ground floor, which also makes me a little leery, depending on the neighborhood.

Are there any other neighborhoods that would be good choices? Are there good places to look online besides craigslist?

Thanks for any help you can provide!

It gets a little dicey as you go over by 16th street or south towards Imperial. I lived there for years when there were no condos and nobody but bums down there. Treat it like you would any big city downtown neighborhood and you'll be fine.
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Old08-02-2007, 03:59 PM
 

Location: Paradise/Las Vegas

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San Diego's version of Skid Row.I think crime is really high over there but I'm not totally sure.

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Old08-03-2007, 02:43 PM
 

Location: Tijuana Exurbs

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jksouthbay88View Post

San Diego's version of Skid Row.I think crime is really high over there but I'm not totally sure.

This is a gross over-generalization. It's like saying all of Manhattan's a dump because the section of the island by the Bus Terminal is bad.

Downtown San Diego has an area of about 2-4 blocks north of East Village that is homeless ground central, because that's where the services are, but there are dozens of blocks that are just regular city blocks. East Village is definitely on the upswing, though you'll still get the occasional whack job whose making a field trip for the day, but mostly it's not an issue that an adult can't handle.

My apoligies that this really doesn't get to the heart of the original poster's question.
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Old08-05-2007, 04:09 AM
 

12 posts, read 69,842 times

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Been living in East Village since 1996 and no problems in terms of crime. Sure there area bunch of homeless walking around, but they are mainly harmless. Heck a group of trying to be good 20 somethings are always feeding them and sitting with them to go over their problems acting like they care..that really makes me chuckle sometimes. Anyways the East village has cleaned up due to Petco Park. There are some apartments on 16th street that are nice.. i think City Villas or something. Buddy of mine lives there and he has a 2 bedroom 2 bath with view of Downtown for under $1500/mth. It is hardly skidrow. A new albertsons opened up in the area and above it are some pretty nice apartments. In 3-5 years it will be the palce to be.

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Old01-19-2015, 08:01 PM
 

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Sorry to bump this thread guys but I'm really considering moving into this area, particularly near Petco Park. I heard about the homeless shelter and I've seen many homeless people on the streets but any updated info about the general safety and/or crime would be appreciated. I don't mind a little ruggedness and noise. Just wondering if it's safe to walk around or park my car somewhere and not have to constantly worry about break ins. Thanks in advance!!

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Old01-19-2015, 08:45 PM
 

Location: Miami (prev. NY, Atlanta, SF, OC and San Diego)

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I don't think there's much to worry about crime, but you hit the nail on the head in terms of homeless. You're also more likely to run into the late night party revelers (i.e. Icon comes to mind) given the young nature of the residents and proximity to Gaslamp and various bars.

You mentioned you were looking for something with a little more character--not the first thing that comes to my mind when I think of East Village...characters?...yes...character, as in the neighborhood?--not really.....I think you would find more character in Little Italy, less homeless, and seemingly a bit less congested (plus not having to put up with traffic and/or noise form 81 home baseball games). Also more artsy/galleries in Little Italy than East Village not to mention better restaurants (funny, but my faves in the area are not Italian) and plenty of great coffee shops and Saturday farmers market...just my 2 cents.


Last edited by elchevere; 01-19-2015 at 09:07 PM..

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Old01-19-2015, 09:20 PM
 

Location: San Diego CA>Tijuana, BC>San Antonio, TX

5,300 posts, read 5,479,012 times

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ms_angelbaby84View Post

Sorry to bump this thread guys but I'm really considering moving into this area, particularly near Petco Park. I heard about the homeless shelter and I've seen many homeless people on the streets but any updated info about the general safety and/or crime would be appreciated. I don't mind a little ruggedness and noise. Just wondering if it's safe to walk around or park my car somewhere and not have to constantly worry about break ins. Thanks in advance!!

The area to the far East is plagued by homelessness and drug use/deals even to this day, I last lived their in 2006. It is not a dangerous place per se, you wont be mugged or robbed (not likely) but don't be to surprised to see a homeless (or faux homeless) person on the sidewalk smoking weed or a crack pipe at night, especially on 14, 15, 16, and 17th streets.
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Old01-19-2015, 09:22 PM
 

Location: Talmadge, San Diego, CA

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Quote:

Originally Posted by malcorub16View Post

The area to the far East is plagued by homelessness and drug use/deals even to this day, I last lived their in 2006. It is not a dangerous place per se, you wont be mugged or robber (not likely) but don't be to surprised to see a homeless (or faux homeless) person on the sidewalk smoking weed or a crack pipe at night, especially on 14, 15, 16, and 17th streets.

All true. The area has been built up quite a bit, but you still see it all. I lived there before it was built up and never had any problems, though.
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Old01-19-2015, 09:38 PM
 

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Thanks a lot guys!! Really appreciate your advice and info!! Will definitely take all into consideration!! 👍

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