Telecaster deluxe vs les paul

Telecaster deluxe vs les paul DEFAULT

Gear Maniac

telecaster deluxe???


how do the telecaster deluxe compare to les paul standards???

and to standard telecasters????

what kind of sound should I expect from the deluxe telecasters??

Im interested in these guitars since I love the fender sound, but I need hotter mics.

Im looking for a fender with a punchier sound, more midrange.

Is this the guitar I need?

Im looking at 70s models.

any experiences???

Gear Addict

 
la grange's Avatar

try a jazzmaster instead. More personality

Oli

What kind of Telecaster Deluxe are you talking about? There are several models, all quite different from each other.

None of them are anything remotely like a Les Paul, aside from the fact that both have 6 strings and 2 pickups.

Gear Addict

 
la grange's Avatar

talking about the 70's deluxe with strat neck and 2 humbuckers I guess.

Oli

Gear Addict

Quote:

Originally Posted by jorstua➡️


Im looking for a fender with a punchier sound, more midrange.

Is this the guitar I need?

Only you can go and answer that- in my experience though if you're lusting after a Tele Deluxe, you need to buy a Tele Deluxe. Sound has nothing to do with it. Most electric guitars consist of some wire stretched over a lump of wood...there aren't that many variables.

Decent amps affect the sound more than most guitars above a certain level of quality imho.

Also- and this is my own personal bugbear- there is a whole world of guitars out there, yet most guitarists don't see beyond Fenders and Gibsons. Like- being adventurous would be trying a Jag or a Mustang or something. We are a weirdly conservative bunch!

I've still got a strat, but I never play it these days...just SO boring...

Here for the gear

Quote:

Originally Posted by la grange➡️

try a jazzmaster instead. More personality

Oli

Or a Jaguar. Though they are rather confusing with all the switches.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jorstua➡️

how do the telecaster deluxe compare to les paul standards???

and to standard telecasters????

what kind of sound should I expect from the deluxe telecasters??

Im interested in these guitars since I love the fender sound, but I need hotter mics.

Im looking for a fender with a punchier sound, more midrange.

Is this the guitar I need?

Im looking at 70s models.

any experiences???

first there will be a difference in sound, tighter low end and a bit more sparkle on the top just due to the longer 25.5" scale of a fender vs the 24.75" on a gibson.

if the back bridge) pickup is a single coil (like std Tele) it will sound like a std tele when using that pickup ..I am quite sure they were not hotter. if it is the two humbucker style it will be hotter and darker than a std Tele and a bit brighter than a Les Paul and have about the same output as a les paul. the front (neck) pickup will be louder than a std tele or strat and be much fatter. more like a Les Paul but with a bit of that fender definition.

the neck material (usually maple) will also brighten it up over an LP.

bottom line is you have to use it .. there are many differences and in a '70's GTR you are getting into the 'sales mojo' area...do your research as to REAL resale value (not GC WAY inflated prices on 'vintage') buy it right and you can sell it if you don't like it....personally I know of very few that have made this their main gtr. I had one with the single coil (std) pickup in bridge position and it was #9 on the list after 2 LP's 3 std tele's a strat and a few parts guitars I built. there was toooo much difference in the sounds of the front and back pickups.

bottom line #2 try the strats with an HB in the bridge.. they don't sound so bad.. have better all around sonic balance and the bridge pickup can be easily swapped to an aftermarket pickup if you want to tweek.. and they are easy to sell if you want to get rid of

my 4 cents worth

try the tele custom too... HB on the neck, so you've got that plus the middle position (HB+SC which might be the tone you're after) or full-on tele twang on the bridge.

the deluxe is terrific, I've got one, but the sound is a bit muddy until you switch out the pots - they really need 500k, but stock are 250k.

and yes, it's probably worth looking at other makes, too, as has been mentioned! G&L, Godin, even smaller manufacturers might have what you need...

Lives for gear

 
rty5150's Avatar

i like teles, but strats with hums in the bridge are hard to beat for sheer versatility.
strats can be whiny as hell in the bridge single coil, swap that for a humbucker and a coil tap and bam! workhorse.

i have teles for tele work, LP's for grind and punch. strats can cover most anything. i mainly play ibanez shred axes, but have specialized axes for specific tones. archtops, lipstick pickup equipped axes for dano tones, etc.

i definitely agree with replacing the 250k with 500k. i do this on all of mine. gets the quack and punch of single coils to pop out more from fenders.

Lives for gear

 
awakened's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by jorstua➡️

how do the telecaster deluxe compare to les paul standards???

are you talking about the tele with the dual hums?

i was going to say, you could put the same pickups in the two diff guitars and still come out with a very different sound. the les paul is mahogany and the teles are usually alder.

are you in the market for a tele with a meatier sound? really, if you like the sound of both a tele and an lp, you have to get both.

Gear Maniac

I thought the deluxe model always came with two humbuckers and that the custom one brought a humbucker on the neck and single coil on the bridge. am I wrong??

anyways, good info. Thanks. Im now considering a trad tele. Guess ill stick to the classic sound for now.

Gear Addict

Quote:

Originally Posted by jorstua➡️

I thought the deluxe model always came with two humbuckers and that the custom one brought a humbucker on the neck and single coil on the bridge. am I wrong??

anyways, good info. Thanks. Im now considering a trad tele. Guess ill stick to the classic sound for now.

There's a Tele custom and a Custom Tele...can't remember which was round it is, but one is a regular Tele with binding- from '59 onwards, and the other one is the Humbucker in the neck one you mentioned

Not sure what the 'other' Tele deluxe is. Some horrible eighties Floyd rose thing maybe?

Lives for gear

 
awakened's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoeM'Geek➡️

Not sure what the 'other' Tele deluxe is. Some horrible eighties Floyd rose thing maybe?



Gear Addict

 
la grange's Avatar

you're absolutely right Jorstua,
There is only one deluxe 70s and that is the double humbuker, start neck with the big headstock.
Lots of other teles have enjoyed the name of deluxe but not from that era.
there is still one I think on the catalog these days, the one with scalloped inner body. Keith Urban has a couple of those.
the sound of those is very similar to the thinline 72 but with more mid and sustain.
As you were hesitating between this and les pauls, it is not the same vibe at all. Not as much output as a gibson humbuker. And long way away from the standard tele.
No words will be as helpful as a play with the instrument.
What sort of music do you play? what amp?

Oli

Gear Maniac

thanks la grange. right now im into what some people call american "trad rock", think kings of leon. I also play some heavier riffs, think white stripes/the raconteurs.

Im looking for a fender with more output. More output with some of that fender twang. Right now, im thinking about sticking a couple of p90s in my current tele standard. I tried the korean model with p90 and liked the vibe.

Do you know of any higher quality teles with p 90s????

any experiences with p90 teles??

thanks

Lives for gear

 
maxpidge's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoeM'Geek➡️

Only you can go and answer that- in my experience though if you're lusting after a Tele Deluxe, you need to buy a Tele Deluxe. Sound has nothing to do with it. Most electric guitars consist of some wire stretched over a lump of wood...there aren't that many variables.

Decent amps affect the sound more than most guitars above a certain level of quality imho.

Also- and this is my own personal bugbear- there is a whole world of guitars out there, yet most guitarists don't see beyond Fenders and Gibsons. Like- being adventurous would be trying a Jag or a Mustang or something. We are a weirdly conservative bunch!

I've still got a strat, but I never play it these days...just SO boring...

you must be a drummer if you cant hear the difference between guitars...
Sours: https://gearspace.com/board/

Fender Telecaster Deluxe

Electric guitar

Fender Telecaster Deluxe
Fender Telecaster Deluxe (clip) (horizontal).jpg
ManufacturerFender
Period1972–1981, 2004–
Body typeSolid
Neck jointBolt-on
Scale25.5"
BodyAlder or Ash
NeckMaple
FretboardMaple
BridgeClassic Series: Vintage Style Strat Strings-Through-Body Hardtail Bridge Classic Player: Vintage Style Synchronized Tremolo
Pickup(s)2 Fender Wide Rangehumbuckers
Classic Series: Black, 3-Color Sunburst, Walnut, Olympic White (FSR) Other colors may be available

The Fender Telecaster Deluxe is a solid-body electric guitar originally produced from 1972 to 1981, and re-issued by Fender multiple times starting in 2004. [1]

History[edit]

The popularity of heavy rock in the late 1960s led Fender to re-think its strategy of exclusively using single-coilpickups, as they were not perceived as being suitable for the thick sound and extended sustain favored by heavy rock guitarists using double-coil humbucking pickups. Consequently, Fender hired former Gibson employee Seth Lover, the inventor of the humbucker himself, to design a humbucking pickup for use in a number of Fender guitars. The result was a pickup known as the Wide Range humbucker, and it was used in a variety of different Fender models including the Deluxe, Custom, and Thinline Telecasters as well as a semi-hollowbody design called the Starcaster. The Deluxe, originally conceived as the top-of-the-line model in the Telecaster series, was the last of these to be released, in late 1972.

The "humbucker" Telecasters failed to draw potential customers away from competition like Gibson's Les Paul model, and the Telecaster Deluxe was discontinued in 1981. However, in 2004, Fender decided to re-issue the Deluxe, probably in response to the belated popularity of the original 1970s version.

Features[edit]

The Deluxe is unique amongst Telecasters in that the neck has an enlarged headstock – a very similar 21-fret neck was used by Fender Stratocaster models manufactured in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. The main difference between the Telecaster Deluxe and Stratocaster necks from this period is that the Telecaster Deluxe neck used medium jumbo frets while the Stratocaster necks featured narrower fretwire. The Telecaster's neck also features the "Micro-Tilt" angle adjustment device located in the heel of the neck, similar to other Fender models of the period.

The body shape was similar to other Telecaster models of the era, with one minor difference – a "belly cut" contour similar to that featured on all Stratocasters was added to the back of the guitar. The Deluxe also had the same "glitch" in its shape as the other Telecasters – a slightly less-pronounced curve where the upper bout meets the neck joint, compared to earlier (and later) Telecasters. This was attributed to more modern routing machines installed in the production line at the time. The 2004 re-issue differs from the original in that it does not have the 1970s "notchless" body style.

The Fender Custom Shop produced Fender Factory Special Run[2] limited-edition versions (FSR) of the guitar in 2005. These FSR '72 Tele Deluxes are made in Corona, California (USA).

The Deluxe features 2 Seth Lover-designed Wide Range humbuckers with "Cunife" (Copper/Nickel/Ferrite) rod magnets in the place of pole-pieces. This design yielded a brighter and clearer sound more similar to that of single coil pickups. They were wound with approximately 6,800 turns of copper wire, yielding a DC resistance of approximately 10.6 kΩ (compared to a standard Gibson P.A.F. humbucker typical DC resistance of 9 kΩ).

Most Deluxes produced have a "hard-tail" fixed bridge with Stratocaster-style string saddles, although for the first couple of years of production a vibrato bridge could be ordered with the guitar – this was the same bridge used on most Stratocasters. As this was not a standard option, models with the vibrato bridge are quite rare. Fender reintroduced the Tele Deluxe with bent steel FENDER FENDER marked saddles, while the originals from the 70's until 1981 were made of cast Mazac. (a zinc alloy)

The volume/tone knobs used on the early Deluxes were very similar to those used on Fender's "Blackface"/"Silverface" range of amplifiers with a chromed "skirt" tip on the top, however in the late 1970s these were replaced with black knobs identical to those used on the Stratocaster.

Reissues[edit]

From 2004 to 2019, Fender run a reissue of the guitar, the Classic Series '72 Telecaster Deluxe.

The 2004 reissue version of the WRHB pickup was redesigned by Fender employee Bill Turner in order to achieve a similar sound in the absence of cunife magnets. While looking almost identical to the original 1970s version it differs greatly in its construction, featuring an alnico bar magnet underneath non-magnetized pole-pieces. It is in fact an ordinary humbucker placed in the larger Wide Range Humbucker casing, and the gap is filled with wax. This is one important reason the reissue Deluxe sounds different from the original guitars. Another reason is the use of 250kΩ volume and tone pots, while the original used 1 MΩ pots. Using 250kΩ pots with very hot humbuckers results in a dark and muddy sound; a common remedy is to replace the controls with 500kΩ pots, which is generally agreed to improve the sound of the reissues. (These same reissue pickups are used for the current 1972 Custom and Thinline Telecaster Reissues.)

The tremolo bridge was an option[3] as a part of the Classic Player series as of 2009, together with a new variant featuring Black Dove P90-style single-coil pickups.[4]

For 2010 Fender has released a limited factory special run of 72 Deluxe Telecasters in their Road Worn Line available in black and olympic white nitrocellulose finishes with the neck and body being aged in appearance, along with aged hardware.

In 2012, Fender ran a factory special version, the FSR Classic Series '72 Telecaster Deluxe, in a number of sparkling color finishes.

Issued in 2017, the Fender American Professional Telecaster Deluxe ShawBucker featured a new version of the WRHB, the ShawBucker, designed by Tim Shaw. This guitar used the original Tele headstock instead of large Stratocaster headstock.

Beginning 2019, the Vintera 70s Tele Deluxe is available, in 3-color Sunburst, Mocha and Vintage Blonde, with 3-bolt neck plate as one of the vintage-style specs that hence the name.[5]

Also in 2019, Fender introduced the '70s Telecaster Deluxe, in black and olympic white, as part of their Squier Classic Vibe series.

In the third quarter of 2020, Fender introduced the American Professional II Telecaster Deluxe as a replacement for American Professional Telecaster Deluxe ShawBucker. With some vintage specs includes large Stratocaster headstock and hardtail bridge, and player-friendly features includes 22 narrow-tall frets and sculpted neck heel. Available in Miami Blue, Dark Night, Mystic Surf Green, Olympic White, Mercury and 3-Color Sunburst.

Similar guitars[edit]

The Telecaster Deluxe is very similar to another Fender model sold in the 1970s – the Telecaster Custom. The Custom can be differentiated from the Deluxe by its use of the "classic Tele"-style neck & headstock, as well as the "ashtray" style bridge and single-coil slanted bridge pickup also used by all other Telecaster models. The Custom was also available with a rosewood fretboard, whereas the Deluxe was only available with maple.

The Telecaster Thinline also featured a version with two "Wide Range" humbuckers, and in most other respects these guitars are very similar.

Electronically, the Tele Deluxe also resembles the Gibson Les Paul – as both models have dual humbucking pickups, an upper-bout mounted 3-way pickup selector switch, and independent volume/tone controls for each pickup.

A very small number of Telecaster Deluxes' (supposedly fewer than 50) left the factory fitted with Stratocaster tremolos. These tremolo equipped Telecaster Deluxes' became highly sought after by collectors and Fender briefly reissued them as part of their Classic Player series in 2009.

Also in 2009, Fender released the Telecaster Thinline Deluxe,[6] combining the best of the Telecaster Thinline and Telecaster Deluxe into a single instrument. This Classic Player Series guitar features a semi-hollow ash body, four-bolt neck, 9.5" radius, Wide Range humbucking pickups, three-position toggle switch, bullet truss rod, four independent controls and skirted amp knobs.

Telecaster Deluxe Black Dove.

As well as reissuing the original tremolo equipped Telecaster Deluxe in 2009, Fender has also introduced a completely new model based on the Deluxe: the Telecaster Deluxe Black Dove. This guitar is effectively the same as the non-trem Deluxe model, but features two Black Dove P90 pickups instead of the twin wide range pickups. The guitar is available in black and transparent crimson red finishes with an alder body.

This model in some ways can be thought of as the Fender version of the Squier Telecaster Custom II that was launched in 2003, as both instruments possess P90 pickups and maple necks, although the Squier version is built with Duncan Designed Pickups and an agathis body.

Black Dove P90 pickups were also used on the short lived Toronado and Strat-o-sonic models.

In 2019, Fender released the "Parallel Universe" series of guitars, which combined iconic features of different model guitars. Among this series was the "Troublemaker Telecaster", which was a combination of a Telecaster Deluxe with Gibson Les Paul features. The notable differences between this guitar and a Telecaster Deluxe are the hardtail bridge (vs. string-through-body) and no routing between the pickup selector switch and the neck pickup, thus the guitar needs no oversized pickguard to shield the electronics. In 2020, two Made-in-Japan Fender Troublemakers were released. They had the same pickup/knob setup as the 2019 US version, except these models were fashioned after Gibson Custom Shop models, with more intricate binding, and only black/white finish options.

Notable players[edit]

Main article: List of Telecaster players

Jon Toogood, Tom Herman (Pere Ubu), Graham Coxon, Chris Martin, Noel Gallagher, Adam Devlin, Jeff Rosenstock, Joe Trohman, Alex Kapranos, Alex Gaskarth, Deryck Whibley, Travis Duennes, Chris Shiflett, Lee Ranaldo, Thom Yorke, Marc Watt, Gary Lightbody, Taylor York, Josh Farro, Peter Buck, Justin Pierre and Bill Janovitz amongst others all play or have played Telecaster Deluxes.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fender_Telecaster_Deluxe
  1. Miami dade police jurisdiction map
  2. Echo 620p vs stihl 362
  3. 36 volt lithium battery
  4. Great neck estates village hall
  5. Accident 101 freeway today

The Big Review: Fender American Professional II Telecaster Deluxe

Fender’s updated American Professional instruments were unveiled with a social media fanfare in late 2020 and we were hugely impressed with the standard Strat and Tele models. A general vibe of refinement means that everything about these guitars feels optimised and dialled in – from the rolled fingerboard edges and sculpted neck heel to the superbly voiced electronics. The latest Am Pro II model on our test bench is the Telecaster Deluxe, and it might just be the best of the bunch.

Showcased here in silverburst-style Mercury – just one of a range of striking finishes designed to pop on Instagram as effectively as custom colours did on the new colour television sets of the 1960s – the American Professional II Telecaster Deluxe naturally bears something of an aesthetic resemblance to the Tele Deluxe of 1972. But if you want the sounds and specifications of the 1970s, you’ll have to look elsewhere.

Fender American Professional II Telecaster Deluxe

Fender recently recreated the Seth Lover-designed Wide Range pickups with CuNiFe magnets for its American Original vintage reissues. The pickups in our review guitar look similar but are actually V-Mod II Double Tap units, sized like regular PAF-style humbuckers and wired here with single-coil voices available via individual push/push tone controls.

Fender American Professional II Telecaster Deluxe

The maple neck is a four-screw affair finished in Fender’s ‘Super-Natural’ satin and it boasts 22 narrow-tall frets, a rosewood ’board, headstock-end truss-rod access and Micro-Tilt neck angle adjustment.

the American Professional II Telecaster Deluxe naturally bears something of an aesthetic resemblance to the Tele Deluxe of 1972

The Tele Deluxe features a chopped-down bridge but, like the full-size bridge of its more traditionally configured Am Pro II Telecaster stablemate, the trio of brass barrel saddles are intonation-compensated and you can string through the body, top load or combine both for optimal feel. The outer saddles don’t have domed ends but palm-protection is provided by the raised sides of the bridge plate.

Fender American Professional II Telecaster Deluxe

In use

The ergonomic improvements common across the American Professional II range are accompanied here by a generous ribcage contour, which has always been a feature of the Telecaster Deluxe design and helps the model have a more svelte feel than a slab-bodied Tele, especially when seated. That said, we’ve owned a few early 1970s Fenders over the years and, while the good ones aren’t the ungainly boat anchors they’re so often made out to be, they certainly don’t offer anywhere near as smooth a ride as this.

The Deluxe is comfortable and compact, with the neck profile providing just the right blend of substance and support

One of the attributes of a great guitar is that it simply gets out of the way and lets you get on with the business of making music. The Deluxe is comfortable and compact, with the neck profile providing just the right blend of substance and support without pushing you in any particular stylistic direction and, when you plug in, it’s the same story with the pickups.

The space between the archetypal Fender single-coil and Gibson humbucking flavours proves here to far from bland. It’s a Telecaster that’s freeing to spend time with; you don’t immediately relax into familiar tropes and there’s a freshness that inspires you to explore and compose rather than simply noodle.

Whether in full humbucker or single-coil mode – or a blend of both in the middle setting – all over the fretboard you’ll find alluring combinations of depth and clarity

Whether in full humbucker or single-coil mode – or a blend of both in the middle setting – all over the fretboard you’ll find alluring combinations of depth and clarity, honk and spank, woodiness and upper-harmonic sheen. In this chassis and with this wiring configuration, the V-Mod II Double Tap pickups have unbridled potential and it’s easy to imagine this guitar becoming someone’s number-one electric. If Fender ever releases a version with a vibrato, there’s a good chance it will become a go-to guitar for us too.

Key Features

  • PRICE £1,699 (inc hard case)
  • DESCRIPTION Singlecut solidbody electric, made in USA
  • BUILD Alder body with gloss urethane finish, maple neck with ‘Super-Natural’ satin urethane finish and gloss headstock face, 9.5″ radius rosewood fingerboard with 22 narrow-tall frets, bone nut
  • HARDWARE Custom ‘cut-off’ vintage-style bridge with 3x compensated brass saddles, Fender Standard cast/sealed staggered tuners
  • ELECTRONICS 2x V-Mod II Double Tap humbuckers, 2x volume, 2x tone (push/push coil split), 3-way toggle pickup selector, treble bleed circuit
  • SCALE LENGTH 25.5”/648mm
  • NECK WIDTH 43.0mm at nut, 51.6mm at 12th fret
  • NECK DEPTH 20.9mm at first fret, 23.2mm at 12th fret
  • STRING SPACING 35.3mm at nut, 54.3mm at bridge
  • WEIGHT 7.9lb/3.58kg
  • LEFT HANDERS No, American Professional II Telecaster only
  • FINISHES Mercury (as reviewed), Three-Colour Sunburst, Dark Night (all rosewood ’board), Miami Blue, Mystic Surf Green, Olympic White (all maple ’board)
  • CONTACTfender.com

Like this? Try these..

Sours: https://guitar.com/review/electric-guitar/the-big-review-fender-american-professional-ii-telecaster-deluxe/
LES PAUL WUJUD TELECASTER!! Squier Classic Vibe 70's Telecaster Deluxe

Telecaster Deluxe vs. SG

Joeydego

Joeydego

your mom is a nice lady
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
24,110
Reaction score
38,899
Let me start by saying everyone is different and the beauty of guitar playing is personal preference. Given that, I feel humbucking pickups dont belong within 100 miles of a tele. Its like a chinese guy who speaks spanish: it just doesnt add up. My SG is a niche guitar. Its my go to for certain kinds of lead sounds, mostly overdriven anthem type rock stuff when a track calls for that. It does that very well (and so do my les pauls, I guess I gotta be in the SG mood). If its a bluesy laid back track, with just a little grit, the kind that makes you keep re stating the lick because it sounds THAT good, well its the tele, specifically the 52 reissue.
Sours: https://www.mylespaul.com/threads/telecaster-deluxe-vs-sg.27849/

Deluxe paul telecaster vs les

Les Paul vs. Telecaster: Put Their Tones to the Test

Darrell Braun is a man who likes to compare guitar tones, and in this new video he checks out two giants of the guitar world: the Gibson Les Paul and the Fender Telecaster.

It might seem absurd to compare the tone of a Gibson Les Paul with that of a Fender Telecaster. After all, the guitars are vastly different in their construction and electronics. But as Darrell points out, not everyone owns both guitars. Even if you do, it’s possible that you’ve never done an A-B comparison between them before.

For this video, Darrell tries out a Gibson Les Paul Traditional and a Fender American Standard Telecaster. He plays three riffs back to back in each pickup position.

Give it a look, and when you’re done check out more of Darrell’s videos on YouTube.

Sours: https://www.guitarworld.com/gear/les-paul-vs-telecaster-put-their-tones-test
-No talking- Fender USA AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL TELECASTER DELUXE VS Gibson Les Paul GT

The Fender American Professional Telecaster Deluxe HH ShawBucker vs. the Gibson Les Paul Studio Traditional

Wesman Todd Shaw started playing the guitar when he was 12 years old. He loves nothing more than to pick one up and pluck some strings.

Maybe you're a person who's been playing for a while. You've likely got a nice intermediate level electric guitar. You can definitely play a bit, and you plan to keep at it for years to come. Really, you can't imagine not playing guitar, even if it is just in your own home. It is ever so relaxing.

It could be you're serious about it, this isn't just something you plan to do for fun. You play really well, and you know you should get paying jobs at it soon. Maybe you already get paid to perform music, and it is time to upgrade the equipment to something you can be proud of forever.

There are guitarists out there who are super monogamous with their instrument. It's like they think the wood and stringed thing is their lover, and they mate for life. Willie Nelson is someone like that. Most guitarists are quite happy to fool around. They want more than one good guitar. Some want as many as possible.

Two legendary designs

In the world we live in our choices are often constrained by how much money we have to spend. If you're dead set on buying an American made classic electric guitar, and you have about fifteen hundred dollars at the max to spend, do you go for a Gibson Les Paul Studio, or one of the new Fender Professional guitars you've been hearing so much about?

You couldn't possibly go wrong with either of these guitars. Fender and Gibson are the big two manufacturers of electric guitars in the USA. Anywhere in the world where electric guitars are played, there are players with Gibson or Fender. Then there are those who desire to own such fine things.

The Telecaster debuted for sale under the name of 'Broadcaster,' in 1950. Two years later, Gibson would introduce its Les Paul. In the years which have followed there have been near countless versions of both, with all manner of various manufacture specifications.

Fast forward to the year 2017. Here we are, and we're living in the golden age of consumerism. Our Telecaster and our Les Paul are just as valid, useful, and desirable as ever. We've got roughly fifteen hundred dollars to spend towards the electric guitar to last us the rest of our lives, and we know we want either a Tele or a Paul. We want the very most guitar we can get for our money, and we want made in the USA.

So for this page we will discuss the brand spanking new, hot off the production line Fender American Professional Telecaster Deluxe HH Shawbucker. And we will compare it to the Gibson Les Paul Studio T. There are several different versions of the Les Paul Studio, but the 'T,' or traditional version is the one which falls within our price range. I'm not interested in a better or worse take on these fine instruments. I love both of them. I want to go over their features and hopefully give useful information for someone to make decisions for themselves.

The all new Fender American Professional Telecaster Deluxe HH Shawbucker

What is the Fender American Professional series? The easy answer is these guitars are the replacements for the Fender American Standard line of guitars. The American Standard line started in 1987, and the people at Fender decided to change things up, and offer something new.

There are some key changes to this new flagship line, and they are found within the pickups, necks, nuts, frets, bridges, and cases. There are also some new colors offered. All changes represent what Fender believes will be accepted as improvements. I'll go over all of these changes, but this model Telecaster is also entirely new.

The new Fender bridges are only for guitars with tremolo, so there is nothing new about the bridge on this guitar. The neck, however, is very new. It is of a “Deep C” neck profile, which falls perfectly in between the flat, slim feel of a modern C profile and chunkier feel of a vintage U profile. The new frets on that neck are the narrow and tall variety we have heard so much about. Most people do love them already, and the reason is they facilitate string bending, making it more doable and with less effort expended.

The American Professional line of Fender guitars all feature brand new pickups created by Tim Shaw. The American Pro Tele here, of course, features the well known Shawbucker T1 and T2 set. The T2 is the hotter of the two pups, and so it is found in the bridge position. The new Treble-Bleed circuitry has been included in the design, which works to make sure there’s no tone loss at lower volumes and your higher frequencies are preserved. This is ideal for those who use their volume pots for dynamics rather than pedals.

Fender America Pro guitars now feature genuine bone nuts instead of synthetic bone nuts. Yes, these are not vegan guitars. Well, bone is always a superior material when one desires volume, sustaine, and clarity in the way an American professional musician should.

Did I mention the new colours? The new Sonic Gray, Mystic Seafoam and Antique Olive colour schemes look stunning. There are, of course, many of the older and more well known Fender colors still available.

Instead of a moulded case, you get an Elite Moulded Case which is stronger, sturdier and safer for your guitar overall, making each option a perfect travel companion for touring musicians. Regardless of whether or not you take your guitar out to clubs to play, you won't be able to help but to be pleased with a sturdier case for your close stringed friend.

Fender American Professional Telecaster Deluxe HH ShawBucker features:

  • Body type: Solid body
  • Body material: Solid wood
  • Body wood: Alder. Ash on Natural
  • Body finish: Gloss Polyurethane
  • Neck shape: Modern Deep C
  • Neck wood: Maple
  • Joint: Bolt-on
  • Scale length: 25.5 in.
  • Truss rod: Dual-action
  • Neck finish: Satin
  • Fretboard Material: Rosewood or Maple
  • Radius: 9.5 in.
  • Fret size: Tall narrow
  • Number of frets: 22
  • Inlays: Dot
  • Nut width: 1.687 in. (42.8 mm)
  • Pickups Configuration: HH
  • Neck: Shawbucker 1T
  • Bridge: Shawbucker 2T
  • Active or passive pickups: Passive
  • Series or parallel: Series
  • Control layout: Volume 1, volume 2, tone 1, tone 2
  • Pickup switch: 3-way
  • Bridge type: Fixed
  • Bridge design: 6-saddle string through body
  • Tailpiece: Not applicable
  • Tuning machines: Deluxe staggered
  • Color: Nickel/chrome
  • Special features: Electronics
  • Case: Hardshell case

The Gibson Les Paul Studio Traditional

The Les Paul Studio T is simply a better guitar than the early 1950s LPs. No don't burn me as a witch, it is true. These guitars have all that made the Lesters from the early years great, and the best of the modern upgrades to go along with it. And it is for sale at a price a working person can save up for.

Mahogany bodies and carved maple tops help to create tonal magic. God's gift to rock and roll. It is modern weight relief, through chambering the bodies, however, which make these lightweight enough to stand and play for an hour or more without one throwing out the old back. You could even jump around like Pete Townshend, strut and shimmy like Jimmy Page, but be sure you thank modern building techniques.

The neck is mahogany, the fretboard is rosewood. All the classic build elements of a Les Paul are here. The only thing that prevents these from being standards are some omitted binding. Binding takes a lot of man hours, man hours cost a lot of money.

These guitars are available in three finishes. They all look terrific. I'm showing black cherry burst, but there are also ebony and wine red available at the same exact price. They all come in a classic brown hard shell case. The case is beautiful, like a piece of leather furniture, and provides great protection.

Our pickups are the tried and true 490R and 498T combo set. Gibson's Seth Lover invented the humbucking 'PAF' style pickups in 1957. This set is another of the same mold, and the 490R is terrific for your Black Sabbath sludge. The 498T will cut through your mix with a dirty raggedness heard millions of times on classic rock radios around the world.

Then there is coil tapping available. Each pickup can be split into single coil. So this guitar can produce a bevy of tonal tornadoes, surely one of them will twist your soul on any given day. You can hit a note from single coil or humbucker settings, go grab a coffee down the street, come back home, and the note is sustaining. I mean without setting your amp's volume to 'eleven' even.

Gibson 2017 Les Paul Studio T features

  • Body shape:Les Paul
  • Body material:Mahogany
  • Top wood:Grade A Plain Maple
  • Body wood:Mahogany
  • Body finish:Select finish
  • Neck shape:Slim Taper
  • Neck wood:Mahogany
  • Joint:Set Neck
  • Scale length:24.75
  • Truss rod:Single Action
  • Neck finish:Select finish
  • Fretboard Material:Rosewood
  • Radius:12"
  • Fret size:Medium
  • Number of frets:22
  • Inlays:Trapezoid
  • Nut width:1.695"
  • Pickups Configuration:Dual Humbuckers
  • Neck:490R
  • Bridge:498T
  • Active or passive: Passive
  • Special electronics: Coil tapping
  • Control layout:2 volumes, 2 tones
  • Pickup switch:3-way switch
  • Coil tap or split:Individual coil tapping per pickup
  • Bridge type:Tune-o-matic
  • Tailpiece:Stop Bar
  • Chrome Color Tuning machines:Grover Kidneys
  • Case:Hardshell Case
  • Accessories:Owners Manual, Truss Rod Wrench

The Importance of Scale Length

How in the world could someone choose between these two outstanding guitars? It is an admittedly tough decision. It's why I created this page. One of the biggest differences, one of the most deciding things hasn't been discussed yet, and that is the length of scale.

Gibson's Les Paul has a shorter scale length. It always has. Fender, of course, is longer. The difference is between 24.75" and Fender's 25.50". It's not much in length, but it makes a difference.

What is scale length, anyway? A guitar's scale length is calculated by measuring the distance from the front edge of the nut, where it butts against the end of the fingerboard, to the center of the 12th (octave) fret, then doubling that measurement. The scale length absolutely affects the tonality of a guitar. I mean the way the thing sounds.

Besides the influence on tone scale length naturally has, what else? Scale length influences how tight the strings are in standard tuning. With a shorter Gibson scale length, the strings aren't so tight as they are in standard tuning as they would be on a typical Fender, like the American Pro Tele Deluxe HH Shawbucker. The looser strings while in tune on the Les Paul make string bending easier to do.

Then there is the matter of de-tuning your guitar. With a longer length of scale one can more easily de-tune the guitar and still have the string tension enough to be playable. Tony Iommi and many another great guitarist regularly de-tuned their Gibson guitars, but nearly everyone admits that the strings being too loose can inhibit your playing.

One last thing to consider about scale length is it influences what size strings one may be comfortable using. Fender scale length makes it easier to use thicker strings. Why would someone use thicker strings? They do influence the tone, as most all things on a guitar do. Stevie Ray Vaughan was a guy who used much thicker than normal strings on his Fender guitars. Most persons want to use strings as thin as possible, it's all really only ever about what feels and sounds best to you.

Coil Taps and Tonewoods

The Les Paul Studio T offers the utility of coil taping. The Fender American Professional Telecaster Deluxe HH Shawbucker does not. Depending on only you, this could be the determining factor in your purchase.

Look, quite a lot of the Les Paul models that sell for more than twice the Studio T's price do not offer coil taps. I'm not sure why that is so, but I'm sure that it is so. There is no doubt coil taping provides some very real, very usable tonal diversity.

What a coil tap does is literally split a humbucker pickup into a single coil. The thing about it is, however, that the Les Paul scale length, the Les Paul mahogany body, neck, and maple top, these things prevent the split coil from ever sounding so twangy or bright as a single coil Fender will sound.

This fine Fender, due to its scale length, its either ash or alder body, and its not having a maple top - it can never truly sound like a Gibson Les Paul. The Shawbucker pickups can get it close to there, but never quite there. The Gibson will always have more growl, the Fender will always have more twang. Possibly Fender didn't include coil taps for the HH Shawbucker Tele because they knew that were you to work the tone controls on your amps and guitar, there could be enough twang created to make the taps unneeded.

Finally, You Can't Go Wrong

You can't have made a mistake for purchasing either one of these guitars. You've got a Fender with the ability to do some growling like a Gibson, and you've got what is probably the single best deal in any Gibson Les Paul. With either guitar you'd have something to forever be proud of.

These are two classics. These are both on the platform of American musical legends, and American manufacturing legends. At some point in time every guitarist who plays electric wants to own one or both, and of course, a Stratocaster too. I hope this has been useful.

Sours: https://spinditty.com

Similar news:

My cock slipped inside already halfway. Despite the copious portion of the cream, I was unable to insert the penis to its full length. I began to move back and forth, carefully pushing the phallus into the tight opening. Ksyushenka, completely strung on my penis, moaned softly.



1379 1380 1381 1382 1383