El toro six flags

El toro six flags DEFAULT

El Toro

Sponsored by

Stride (2011)

Ride type

Wooden roller coaster

"Do you have what it takes to tame the bull?"
―Slogan[src]

El Toro (Spanish: The Bull) is a wooden roller coaster located in Plaza del Carnaval at Six Flags Great Adventure. It opened to the public on June 12, 2006, with a soft opening on the previous day, June 11.

The ride replaced Viper, and uses the same station structure from the former roller coaster.

History

El Toro was announced on September 28, 2005 along with Bugs Bunny National Park, a new themed area for children. It was also announced El Toro would be part of a new themed area known as Plaza del Carnaval.[1]

Viper closed in 2004, and all of the former coaster was removed except for the station. The station was gutted, and an entirely new platform was built.

The lift hill was topped off on December 20, 2005.[2] The ride started testing on Memorial Day weekend in 2006.[3]

The ride had a surprise opening on June 11 then held its grand opening on June 12.[4][5]

El Toro suffered a malfunction with the lift motor in early August of 2013. The motor was sent to Maryland to be fixed. [6] El Toro reopened on August 30th, after it had been down for several weeks.

Ride experience

After departing from the station, the train makes a turn to the left, passing through the ride's structure. It then begins to climb the 180-foot tall cable lift hill. Once the entire train is on the lift the cable increases its speed to 13 mph. Once at the top of the lift the speed of the cable gently slows down, but it is barely noticeable on the ride. After cresting the top of the lift, the train briefly travels forward and makes a 180 degree turn to the left. It then drops 176 feet at a 76 degree angle, at which you feel as if you're being forced towards the ground, reaching a top speed of seventy miles per hour. As the train reaches the bottom of the drop it comes close to the track above, creating a headchopper-effect. It then travels up a 112 foot camelback hill passing the on-ride camera. It then goes up a second camelback hill at 100 feet and then travels through a 180 degree downward-banked turn to the right, and up another banked turn to the left. The train goes through a small second hill that speeds past the station and the lakeside. The ride then makes another turn and up a smaller hill where riders experience ejector airtime. After coming down the drop, the ride snakes through twists and turns. After coming out of the twister section, the train slows down as it moves through small S turn hills and into the brake run.[7][8][9]

Characteristics

Theme

As El Toro is Spanish for "The Bull", El Toro has a heavy Spanish theme. The cars are themed as "bulls" with bull heads on the front. The ride's queue is surrounded by the Southwestern-style buildings of Plaza del Carnaval, and also has abandoned "wagon wheels" and Spanish posters along a wall separating the queue from the ride.[8]

Trains

El Toro operates with two trains with six cars per train. Riders are arranged two across in three rows for a total of 36 riders per train. It has a capacity of 1,200 guests per hour.[8] The trains are simply known as "Train A" (light brown) and "Train B" (dark brown). The trains have padded "wings" at shoulder level to prevent riders from being thrown too far to the side in the final twister section. El Toro's lapbars are U-shaped.

In 2010, one of the trains was re-themed to endorse Stride Gum. The train was wrapped in Stride Gum advertisements, showing a different flavor of Stride gum on each car.[10] The advertisements remained on the train for the entire 2011 season, but were removed before the start of the 2012 season and replaced with Kia Soul advertising.[11]

Awards

Golden Ticket Awards: Top Wood Roller Coasters
Year 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Position 9 4 3 2 3 1 2 2 2 3 1 2 3

El Toro has been awarded #1 wooden roller coaster in the world in both 2012 and 2017, and has stayed in the top 10 since the Golden Ticket Awards began the Top Wood Roller Coasters category in 2007.

Gallery

Videos

El Toro Front Seat POV 2015 FULL HD Six Flags Great Adventure

El Toro Front Seat POV 2015 FULL HD Six Flags Great Adventure

Images

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El Toro's Chicken Exit Sign

El Toro's Chicken Exit Sign

References

See also

External links

Sours: https://sixflags.fandom.com/wiki/El_Toro

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El Toro at Six Flags Great Adventure has been named the best wooden roller coaster in the United States.

At more than 180 feet high, perched upon a massive scaffolding of pine and fir, it features a 76-degree scream-worthy plunge that its builders boast is the steepest drop of any wooden roller coaster in the world. On their way down, riders hit 70 miles an hour, as they zip across a series of camelbacks and slam into several high-G banked turns, in an intense lesson about the power of physics along a 4,400-foot-long track.

But the popular coaster is not for the faint at heart. El Toro, which has been shut down since June 29 after a partial derailment, has had nine reported ride incidents since 2018, according to state data examined by NJ Advance Media — more than any other attraction at Six Flags in Jackson Township.

Most recently, the ride was forced to stop short of the station after the rear “up-stop” wheel, which prevents the train from lifting, came up on top of the rail, according to the Department of Community Affairs, the agency that regulates and inspects amusements in New Jersey. Nobody was hurt.

Nearly two months later, El Toro remains shut down and park officials will not say when, or if, it will reopen.

The mishap, meanwhile, was only the latest in a string of incidents at Six Flags this season, some that have led to injuries, or temporarily shut down some rides. Since March, there have been 13 incidents at Six Flags reported to the state with another two at Hurricane Harbor, the waterpark operated by Six Flags, the data showed, some garnering no public attention.

Among those incidents

  • On Fender Bumpers, a child-oriented ride, a guest in April complained of back pain after she claimed to have been struck from behind, according to a report of the incident.
  • In June, two people were hurt after two boats collided coming down a chute on the Saw Mill log flume ride. Earlier in the season in May on the same ride, a station drive motor with a bad drive belt caused smoke to rise from under the station, but caused no injuries.
  • On July 11, the park temporarily suspended operation of its Nitro roller coaster after a complaint that a restraining bar intended to keep riders in the seats had malfunctioned. While no one was injured, a report of the incident found that the seat had a misaligned lap bar position sensor.
  • On July 14, a young boy suffered a head injury on The Joker and the coaster was taken out of service for an investigation.
  • On July 24, a guest riding Green Lantern, a roller coaster that puts riders through five inversions — all while standing up — reportedly passed out and did not regain consciousness until moved from the ride by EMTs.

The state data showed the number of incidents this year at Six Flags, while relatively low in number, have already exceeded those reported in 2019, but remain well below those in 2018.

The COVID pandemic affected amusement park attendance across the country in 2020.

Officials at Six Flags Great Adventure said the park invests significant resources in its safety programs.

“Six Flags has an excellent safety record and one of the most comprehensive safety programs in our industry. In fact, we are a leader in the development of safety standards used in theme parks around the world, and all Six Flags parks adhere to these standards,” said spokesman Gabriel Darretta, noting the rides in New Jersey are inspected annually by internal and external experts. He added that the park’s maintenance and safety teams complete extensive safety checks before opening the rides each day.

Darretta did not respond to specific questions about the rides where the most recent mishaps occurred, but said the Log Flume reopened July 9, after an investigation and full safety inspection.

As for the future of El Toro, Darretta said only that it remains closed.

“It is one of our signature attractions, and we are working diligently to reopen the ride following testing and a full safety inspection by both internal and external experts,” he said. “It is important to note that the train’s safety systems worked as designed and no guests were injured.”

According to the state incident reports, though, riders have been hurt on El Toro in the past, although none appeared to involve anything more significant than the kind of bumps, sprains and bruises that seem to come with high-velocity thrill rides across the country.

In 2018, two riders reported neck pain after getting off El Toro. Another reportedly came off ride unconscious, according to one state incident report, which said attendants were “unable to determine what exactly occurred as the family did not speak English.”

Last year, a guest hit her head against the headrest of the ride vehicle during the course of the ride and another was struck in the eye when someone’s hat flew off and hit him in the face, according to the incident reports filed with the state.

Not all reported incidents at amusement parks in the state result in injuries, and reports may be filed in connection with simple ride malfunctions, mechanical faults or even slips and falls while waiting on line.

Since 2018, for example, six incidents have been reported by Essex County in connection with its slow-moving kiddie train at the Turtle Back Zoo, including several derailments. None involved injuries, the state data indicated.

And in fact, the number of actual violations issued to ride operators by state inspectors has been relatively constant over the years.

Most of them — 466 — involve electrical subcode violations. Operators were also often cited for assembly and disassembly violations, usually involving traveling rides. In addition, 187 violations have been issued for worn parts between 2018 and 2021. Inspectors also hit operators with 139 violations for electrical equipment and wiring, and 75 for maintenance and repair.

Among all amusement operators in New Jersey, 62 rides were tagged “out of service” at some point in the past four years because of issues with seatbelts, lap bars, straps and shoulder harnesses, chains, secondary locking devices and any other form of restraint, according to an analysis of the state data.

Nationwide, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said from 2017-2019, an annual average of 34,700 injuries associated with amusement attractions, including water slides, were seen in U.S. hospital emergency departments.

The ride in New Jersey that generated the most number of incident reports since 2018, in fact, was a water slide, the state data revealed.

Patriots Plunge at Casino Pier & Breakwater Beach in Seaside Heights had 10 reported incidents. Most involved riders who go down the slide on mats losing control on their way down. One went head over feet over mat in the runout, with a front tooth biting into their upper lip. In June, a guest flipped near bottom and was cut on his arm. He was also not alert or oriented after he came off the slide, unable to say where he was or say his name, according to the state report of the incident.

“We will not be commenting on any incidents from our parks,” said park spokeswoman Maria Mastoris Saltzman.

Last year, the CPSC said the number of injuries attributed to amusement rides in the United States were down significantly, to 12,400, attributing the large decrease most likely due to Covid closures.

Since 2016, the CPSC said it was aware of 17 deaths across the country including the recent Adventureland death in Iowa, where an 11-year-old boy was killed after a raft on a white-water river ride overturned earlier this year.

In two of other cases cited by the agency, the victim had snuck in while the park was closed. One of the 17 cases involved a man thrown from a mechanical bull.

Here in New Jersey, 10-year old Hailey Lynn McMullen was killed in October 2019 after she was thrown from the “Xtreme Super Sizzler” at the Harvest Festival in Deerfield Township in Cumberland County.

The IAAPA, the global association for the attractions industry once known as the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions, said visiting an amusement park remains a favorite tradition for millions of Americans and that safety is a priority.

“One injury is one too many,” said spokeswoman Susan Storey. “If an incident does occur, park operators investigate what happened, review the findings, and if necessary, will make adjustments to continue to provide the safest experience possible.”

She said ongoing ride maintenance includes inspection, testing, part replacement and passing inspection from local and/or state governing authorities, insurance companies and third-party inspectors, regardless if the facility is a seasonal or year-round operation.

Officials at Six Flags say they operate in a very safe industry.

“Approximately 290 million guests visit the 300 U.S. amusement parks each year, taking 1.7 billion rides. At Six Flags Great Adventure, we provide more than 15 million safe rides each year and we continue to see high demand for our rides and attractions,” said Darretta. “The safety of our guests and team members is paramount.”

__

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Ted Sherman may be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @TedShermanSL

Sours: https://www.nj.com/news/2021/08/a-string-of-incidents-at-six-flags-raises-questions-about-amusement-ride-safety.html
World's Best Wooden Roller Coaster? - El Toro Review \u0026 Analysis - Six Flags Great Adventure

El Toro (Six Flags Great Adventure)

wooden roller coaster at Six Flags Great Adventure

El Toro (Spanish for The Bull) is a wooden roller coaster located at Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson Township, New Jersey. Designed by Werner Stengel and manufactured by Intamin, the ride opened to the public on June 11, 2006. Intamin subcontracted Rocky Mountain Construction (RMC) to build the ride, and the coaster's track was prefabricated, allowing for quicker installation and lower construction costs.[2] El Toro is the main attraction of the Mexican-themed section of the park, Plaza Del Carnaval. It replaced another roller coaster, Viper, which closed following the 2004 season.

When it opened, El Toro had the steepest drop of any wooden roller coaster in the world at 76 degrees, a record that was later broken by T Express at Everland in 2008. Among wooden coasters, its height of 181 feet (55 m) ranks fourth, its drop height of 176 feet (54 m) ranks second, and its maximum speed of 70 mph (110 km/h) ranks third. El Toro was also the first wooden roller coaster to use a cable lift instead of a chain lift mechanism traditionally found on other wooden coasters. The coaster has been well-received, and with the exception of its first two years of operation, has consistently ranked in the top three of the annual Golden Ticket Awards publication from Amusement Today.

History[edit]

El Toro sits on the former site of Viper, which closed in 2004.[3] Everything was removed in early 2005 except for the station.[4] El Toro was announced on September 28, 2005, along with Bugs Bunny National Park, a new themed area for children. It was also announced El Toro would be part of a new themed area known as Plaza del Carnaval.[5] The lift hill was topped off on December 20, 2005.[6] The ride started testing on Memorial Day weekend in 2006.[7] The ride had a surprise opening on June 11, then held its grand opening on June 12.[8][9]

El Toro has several similarities to Viper, the coaster that it replaced. The most obvious similarity is that El Toro uses Viper's station, the only part of Viper that was not torn down.[4] The station previously held two Viper trains at once, with a loading platform in the front and an unloading platform in the rear. The ramp that was previously Viper's main exit is now used only for wheelchair access, as El Toro has a new exit on the other side of the station. During El Toro's construction, the station was gutted and an entirely new platform built. Like El Toro, Viper turned left out of the station before the lift hill and turned left at the top of the lift before the first drop.

Description[edit]

El Toro carries a Mexican theme, and its name translates to "The bull" in Spanish. Each train has a bull's head ornament mounted on the front. The line queue of the ride is surrounded by Southwestern-style buildings of Plaza del Carnaval, and it features abandoned "wagon wheels" and Spanish posters along a wall separating the queue from the ride.[10]

Ride layout[edit]

Train A on the second hill

After departing from the station, the train makes a turn to the left, passing through the ride's structure. It then begins to climb the 181-foot (55 m) tall cable lift hill. Once the entire train is on the lift the cable increases its speed to around 13 mph. Once at the top of the lift the speed of the cable gently slows down, but it is barely noticeable on the ride. After cresting the top of the lift, the train briefly travels forward and makes a 180 degree turn to the left. It then drops 176 feet (54 m) at a 76 degree angle, reaching a top speed of 70 miles per hour (110 km/h). As the train reaches the bottom of the drop, it comes close to the track above, creating a headchopper-effect. It then travels up a 112-foot (34 m) camelback hill followed by a second camelback hill at 100 feet (30 m). It then rises and then travels through a 180 degree downward-banked turn to the right, and up another banked turn to the left. The train goes through a small second hill that speeds past the station and the lakeside. The train then makes another turn and up a smaller hill where riders experience -2 g forces on an ejector airtime hill. After coming down the drop, the train snakes through twists and turns. After coming out of the twister section, the train slows down as it moves through small "S" curve camelback hills and into the brake run.[4][10][11]

Trains[edit]

El Toro operates two trains, labeled A and B, each with six cars per train. Riders are arranged two across in three rows for a total of 36 riders per train. It has a theoretical capacity of 1,200 guests per hour.[10] One train has Kia Soul advertising wrapped onto the train itself. The other train has the classic train design, featuring the bull horns on the front of the train. The trains have padded "wings" at shoulder level to prevent riders from being thrown too far to the side in the final twister section.[12] El Toro's lapbars are U-shaped - (Commonly known as "U-Bars".)

Train B maneuvering through the final camelbacks to the brake run
Train B maneuvering through the camelback hill finale

In 2010, one of the trains was re-themed to endorse Stride Gum. The train was wrapped in Stride Gum advertisements, showing a different flavor of Stride gum on each car.[13][14] The advertisements remained on the train for the entire 2011 season, but were removed before the start of the 2012 season and replaced with Kia Soul advertising.[15]

Track[edit]

The wooden track is approximately 4,400 feet (1,300 m) in length and the height of the lift is approximately 181 feet (55 m).[10] El Toro is very different from a traditional wooden roller coaster because it uses prefabricated wooden track. It was built and designed by Intamin, who also worked with employees of Rocky Mountain Construction to build the ride.[16][17] Instead of carpenters cutting, shaping, and laying down the track on site by hand, the track is laser cut in a factory. This means that the track is manufactured to a higher degree of precision than could be achieved by hand.[18] The "Plug and Play" aspect of the coaster speeds construction of the coaster since track does not have to be completely manufactured on site. In addition, because of the speed of construction, the costs of building the coaster are lowered due to fewer man-hours spent on the construction. The riders are subject to a coaster whose track is as smooth as steel. El Toro is the first Intamin "Plug and Play" (Pre-Fab) wooden roller coaster in the United States and one of four in the world. The other three are Colossos at Heide Park in Germany, Balder at Liseberg in Sweden, and T Express at Everland in South Korea.[19]

Records[edit]

When El Toro debuted, it broke records as the second-tallest and fastest with the second-longest drop of a wooden roller coaster in the United States. As of 2016[update], El Toro has the third fastest speed, the third-tallest lift, and the second longest drop.[20][21][22]

Awards and rankings[edit]

When the ride debuted, it ranked 3rd for "Best New Ride of 2006" in the Golden Ticket Awards.[23]

Incidents[edit]

El Toro suffered a malfunction with the lift motor in early August 2013. The motor was sent to Intamin's American headquarters in Maryland to be fixed.[37] El Toro reopened several weeks later on August 30.

On June 29, 2021, a train partially derailed when the rear car's up-stop wheels, which are designed to prevent the train from lifting off the track, moved out of place and up onto the track.[38] The cause is unknown, and all riders were able to safely exit the ride.[39] El Toro is closed indefinitely pending the outcome of an investigation from Intamin.[38][39]

References[edit]

  1. ^"El Toro". Intamin. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  2. ^"Rocky Mountain Construction". Coasterforce. Retrieved November 30, 2018.
  3. ^Marden, Duane. "Viper  (Six Flags Great Adventure)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  4. ^ abc"El Toro at Coaster-Net". Coaster-Net. Archived from the original on May 9, 2013. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  5. ^Six Flags (September 28, 2005). "Six Flags Great Adventure Will Debut Monstrous Wooden Roller Coaster in Newly-Themed Area and New Looney Tunes Kids' Section In 2006" (Press release). PR Newswire. Retrieved January 20, 2013.
  6. ^"Six Flags Great Adventure Tops Off New Roller Coaster". Ultimate Roller Coaster. December 20, 2005. Retrieved January 15, 2013.
  7. ^Davidson, Josh (May 29, 2006). "Six Flags Great Adventure wooden coaster runs". Coaster-Net. Archived from the original on December 19, 2011. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  8. ^"The gate is open for a new coaster!". Coaster-Net. June 12, 2006. Archived from the original on December 19, 2011. Retrieved January 21, 2013.
  9. ^"Run With the Bulls at Six Flags Great Adventure as the Monstrous 'El Toro' Wooden Roller Coaster is Unleashed". PR Newswire. June 12, 2006. Retrieved January 21, 2013.
  10. ^ abcdMarden, Duane. "El Toro  (Six Flags Great Adventure)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  11. ^"El Toro POV". YouTube. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  12. ^Marden, Duane. "Train B photo". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved January 28, 2013.
  13. ^"Design I like- Stride Gum takes over El Toro". May 9, 2010. Retrieved January 28, 2013.
  14. ^"TPR Stride Gum train". Theme Park Review. Retrieved January 28, 2013.
  15. ^"Kia Soul train". Retrieved January 27, 2013.
  16. ^MacDonald, Brady (October 25, 2012). "Looping wooden roller coasters are about to become a reality". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 27, 2013.
  17. ^"Clients & Portfolio". Rocky Mountain Construction. Archived from the original on November 10, 2013. Retrieved January 23, 2013.
  18. ^"Coasters-101: Track Fabrication". Coaster 101. November 6, 2011. Retrieved January 27, 2013.
  19. ^Marden, Duane. "Wooden Coaster(Prefabricated Track)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved January 28, 2013.
  20. ^Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Statistic: Height, Type: Wood)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  21. ^Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Statistic: Speed, Type: Wood)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  22. ^Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Statistic: Drop, Type: Wood)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  23. ^ ab"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today: 30–31B. September 2006. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013.
  24. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 11 (6.2): 42–43. September 2007. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013.
  25. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 12 (6.2): 42–43. September 2008. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013.
  26. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 13 (6.2): 38–39. September 2009. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013.
  27. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 14 (6.2): 38–39. September 2010. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013.
  28. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 15 (6.2): 46–47. September 2011. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013.
  29. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 16 (6.2): 46–47. September 2012.
  30. ^"2013 Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 17 (6.2): 40–41. September 2013. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013.
  31. ^"2014 Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 18 (6.2): 38–39. September 2014.
  32. ^"2015 Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 19 (6.2): 45–46. September 2015.
  33. ^"2016 top 50 wooden roller coasters". Golden Ticket Awards. Amusement Today. September 2016.
  34. ^"2017 Top 50 Wooden Coasters". Golden Ticket Awards. Amusement Today. September 2017.
  35. ^"2018 Top 50 Wooden Coasters". Golden Ticket Awards. Amusement Today. September 2018.
  36. ^"2019 Top Wood". Golden Ticket Awards. Amusement Today. September 2019.
  37. ^http://www.ultimaterollercoaster.com/forums/roller-coasters-theme-parks/228238
  38. ^ abSerrano, Ken (June 30, 2021). "New Jersey shuts down El Toro roller coaster at Six Flags Great Adventure after derailment". Asbury Park Press. Retrieved July 1, 2021.
  39. ^ abWall, Karen (June 30, 2021). "Six Flags' El Toro Coaster Shut Down After Incident: Report". Patch. Retrieved July 1, 2021.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Toro_(Six_Flags_Great_Adventure)

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JACKSON, NJ — Investigators continue to try to determine what caused the rear wheels of a car on the El Toro roller coaster to come off its track at Six Flags Great Adventure 10 days ago.

In a report that Six Flags officials filed with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs about the June 29 incident, officials say the rear wheels of the A6 car "came out from their normal position in the rails."

"The train traveled most of the ride with the rear wheels in this position," the report by Six Flags officials said. "During the ride cycle the vehicle axle position caused damage to the rear wheel assembly, track wood and track steel bolts."

Find out what's happening in Brick with free, real-time updates from Patch.

Park officials said the investigation into what caused the wheels to come out of their normal position, "including the completion of a detailed track gauge and track steel inspection," was continuing.

The Department of Community Affairs provided a copy of the incident report to Patch.

Find out what's happening in Brick with free, real-time updates from Patch.

Lisa M. Ryan, a spokeswoman for the Department of Community Affairs, said the state "red tagged" the ride, meaning it is prohibited from operating and has been put under engineering review.

There were no injuries in the incident, but because the train stopped a few yards before the brake run, riders had to be evacuated, according to the Six Flags incident report.

Though Ryan referred to it as "a partial derailment," Six Flags spokeswoman Kristin B. Fitzgerald rejected that characterization.

"The train's safety systems worked as designed and the train remained on the track," Fitzgerald said.

Ryan said: "El Toro will not reopen until DCA is provided with a report by the ride manufacturer indicating what caused the derailment as well as how to mitigate the issue."

El Toro was designed by German thrill-ride engineer Werner Stengel, who has worked on many of the world's record-breaking roller coasters, including Kingda Ka at Great Adventure.

It was manufactured by Intamin, a Swiss company whose name is shortened from "International Amusement Installations." The company has created dozens of coasters around the world. Intamin contracted with Rocky Mountain Construction to build El Toro, according to Coasterforce.com.

Ryan did not have a timetable on when the state might receive the engineering report.

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Sours: https://patch.com/new-jersey/brick/el-toro-cars-rear-wheels-were-out-position-six-flags-report
Kingda Ka (On-Ride) Six Flags Great Adventure

One of the most popular rides at Six Flags Great Adventure remains shut down, and is not scheduled to resume operations anytime soon.

State ride inspectors are continuing to investigate what they say was a "derailment," although Six Flags disputes that characterization.

NJ.com is detailing a report obtained from the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs that says the wheels of one train car "came out of their normal position on the rails" and cited damage to the car's axle and the wood and steel bolts on the track.

What the report does not say, is what caused the issue or how long the coaster may have been operating under those conditions.

A spokesman for the park told New Jersey 101.5 last week that until those questions can be answered, and the coaster's manufacturer can certify the any needed repairs have been made, the state will not clear El Toro to resume operations. The state has given no timeline for that to be completed but did indicate their investigation is not yet concluded.

One of the tallest and fastest wooden coasters in the world, El Toro has been one of the most popular rides since it opened in 2006. It was twice voted the number one wooden coaster in the world.

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Every beach town has its share of pluses and minuses, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best one to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, that compares U.S. beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The cities ranged in population from 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From those rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will be unsurprised to learn that many of towns featured here are in one of those two states.

Keep reading to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.

Cape May, NJ: 15 wonderful places to visit

Sours: https://nj1015.com/el-toro-coaster-remains-shut-down-amid-safety-concerns/

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El Toro (Six Flags Great Adventure)

El Toro, meaning The Bullin Spanish, is a wooden roller coaster at Six Flags Great Adventure. It opened to the public on June 11, 2006. It was designed by Intamin of Switzerland. It had the steepest drop of any wooden roller coaster in the world, at 76 degrees, until this record was broken by T Express in 2008 by 1 degree. It is the third tallest and third fastest (70 mph) wooden roller coaster in the world. It is also the first wooden roller coaster to use a cable lift hill instead of the traditional chain lift. Because of the extreme negative g-forces (airtime) on the ride, the lap-bar restraints are very tight, causing some problems for older and larger riders.


El Toro is the main attraction of a new Mexican-themed section, Plaza Del Carnaval. Some of the ride's track is located in Rolling Thunder's infield. It is the steepest lifted (as opposed to launched) roller coaster in the park.

Sours: https://tripbucket.com


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