Mackenzie of old beer ads

Mackenzie of old beer ads DEFAULT

Anheuser Busch sued over 'Ghost Spuds' MacKenzie Super Bowl commercial

When mankind colonizes Mars, Budweiser is hoping Martian supermarkets will be well stocked with its suds. (Reuters)

The producers of America's bestselling beer may need to stop using a popular four-legged mascot to promote Bud Light.

That’s the gist of a new lawsuit brought against Anheuser Busch by Spuds Ventures, which claims it owns the rights to the party animal created in the 1980s-- Spuds MacKenzie.

In the lawsuit, the company contends that they own the rights to the fictional dog character with a penchant for consuming Bud Light and that Anheuser-Busch hurt them by using the canine in a Super Bowl LI ad that aired February, without first receiving permission to use the dog in its promo again.

According to the suit cited by TMZ, Anheuser Busch had moved on from its Spuds MacKenzie campaign decades ago following concerns that the pup made beer drinking appear popular to children. In 2013, Spuds Ventures took ownership of the fictional dog.

The company said that the things were quiet after that purchase and that the Bud-maker only objected to the deal last year as they were preparing for a Super Bowl commercial.

Spuds, the brainchild of a 23-year-old art director, first appeared in a Super Bowl spot in 1987 and subsequently became a pop culture phenomenon, appearing on talk shows and inspiring parodies. He even earned his own plush toy and was featured on t-shirts.

But Spuds didn’t exactly become every man’s best friend. According to Thrillist, stores in Ohio wound up removing Bud Light containers that showcased the dog dressed as Santa Claus as it violated a state liquor law. Some schools also banned students from wearing clothing featuring Spuds.

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Anheuser Busch eventually pivoted toward a responsible drinking ad campaign and by 1989 Spuds MacKenzie was retired and the promotion phased out amid whispers that the dog used in the spots had died.

But this year, Bud Light resurrected Spuds from the dead in the recent spot. In the new commercial, a man preparing to stay-in for the night is inspired to head out when a CGI ghost dog visits him at home and takes him on a journey to show him what would happen in his absence. “My soul can't rest when people don't drink Bud Lights with friends,” Spuds says in the spot. "At this very moment your friends are hanging out and you're missing it."

Spuds Ventures is suing for damages and profits that Anheuser Busch made from the commercial.

Sours: https://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/anheuser-busch-sued-over-ghost-spuds-mackenzie-super-bowl-commercial

Spuds MacKenzie

Spuds MacKenzie in an ad.

Spuds MacKenzie in an ad.

Spuds MacKenzie is a fictional dog (bull terrier) character used for an extensive advertising campaign marketing Bud Light beer in the late 1980s. The Spuds MacKenzie mascot and campaign was the idea of a 23-year-old art director, Jon Moore. At the time, he was working at Needham, Harper, and Steers, a Chicago advertising agency. The dog first showed up in a Bud Light Super Bowl XXI ad in 1987.[1]

The dog was portrayed by a female bull terrier named Honey Tree Evil Eye,[2] or Evie for short (October 7, 1983 – May 31, 1993). Evie was from Woodstock, Illinois, and lived in North Riverside, Illinois, with her owner's family, where she later died of kidney failure in 1993.[3][4] Anheuser-Busch sponsored many dogs from the kennel in Illinois where Evie was from.[5]

The Spuds McKenzie ad campaign was not without its share of controversy. Shortly after Spuds' rise to fame, it was learned that the dog, portrayed as male in the ads, was actually female.[5] The ads were criticized for promoting the consumption of alcohol by children by politicians and advocacy groups. Soon after the ads first aired in 1987, Senator Strom Thurmond began his own media campaign, claiming that the beer maker was using Spuds to appeal to children in order to get them interested in their product at an early age.[6] By Christmas 1987, more legal action resulted from Budweiser's use of ads featuring Spuds dressed as Santa, which is illegal in states such as Ohio.[7]

In 1989, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, along with Mothers Against Drunk Driving, alleged that Anheuser-Busch was pitching the dog to children. Although the Federal Trade Commission found no evidence to support that allegation, Anheuser-Busch decided to retire Spuds in 1989, claiming that the character's image had started to overshadow the product.

In 2017, the character appeared in Bud Light's Super Bowl LI advertisement as a ghost who helps a man named Brian reunite with his friends, in an homage to Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. The house number in this advertisement's last segment is 1989, the year Spuds was retired.[8]

Cultural references

  • The character Slurms MacKenzie (“The Original Party Worm”) from the television series Futurama is a parody of Spuds, as is Santa's Little Helper’s stint as “Suds McDuff” on the episode "Old Yeller Belly" of The Simpsons.
  • In his late-1980s anti-“sellout” anthem, “This Note's for You” (the title of which parodies Budweiser’s “This Bud's for You” ad campaign), Neil Young says he “ain't singing for Spuds” in the title track. The dog also appears throughout the music video for the song.
  • The commercial's use of skinny females as a standard of beauty inspired Sir Mix-a-Lot to write "Baby Got Back" in retort.[9]
  • An issue of MAD Magazine in the late 1980s had a study of how cultural standards are going downhill, as one example, tracing how America's favorite dog went from Lassie to Benji to Spuds MacKenzie.
  • A story arc in the comic strip Bloom County involved a drunken Spuds admitting her female gender to Opus and eventually checking into the Betty Ford Center, where she roomed with Mr. Ed.
  • Appears in the Family Guy episodes "Brian Writes a Bestseller" and "A Fish Out of Water".
  • Tone Lōc's song "Funky Cold Medina" lists Spuds McKenzie as one of the dogs trying to get into his house.
  • In The Golden Girls episode "Larceny and Old Lace", Sophia Petrillo is dating a man named Rocco (played by Mickey Rooney), whom she met in a police lineup. According to her daughter Dorothy Zbornak, Rocco was arrested for "spray-painting something obscene" on a billboard of Spuds MacKenzie. Sophia's response is that because "the dog they use in those ads is really a female, Rocco was just making Spuds anatomically correct".[10]

References

Sours: https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Spuds_MacKenzie
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MacKenzie of old beer ads

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Thank you for visiting our website! Below you will be able to find the answer to MacKenzie of old beer ads crossword clue which was last seen on Universal Crossword, January 16 2017. Our site contains over 2.8 million crossword clues in which you can find whatever clue you are looking for. Since you landed on this page then you would like to know the answer to MacKenzie of old beer ads. Without losing anymore time here is the answer for the above mentioned crossword clue:

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Plumber's pipe material (Abbr.)
Handy pencil holder
"It doesn't matter which"
Cancel, as a law
Neptune is one
Wheel shafts
Some missing soldiers
Soccer mom's org.
It's far from the point?
"Eight ___, and all's well!"
Blooper originating in an alley?
Bracket-braced window
Comedy, sci-fi or drama, e.g.
Least wild
Columbus' state
Part of an English exam, often
Infra's opposite
Where to let your fingers do the shopping?
Supply the food
Equipped and trained for the job
Athletic supporter?
Tree part used for timber
Royal Indian woman (var.)
Ran its course
Taking a personal day
See 32-Across
Glide high
Den newcomer
Butting heads
Cleans oneself
Ramble on
Name tag, essentially
"Here!"
Was picturesque?
Dentist's directive
Eggs, in a lab
Not a st.
Sheepish expanse
Flat back muscle, briefly
Alfred Hitchcock-shaped fruit
Greek lyric poet
Wet marshy place
It knows which way the wind is blowing
Like some islands
Miner's valuable discovery
Feature of a building in Oz?
Achieve victory
Batting practice structures
Chisel for a stonemason
The Inuit, old-style
Where to find Santiago
Soaked up some rays
Part of a willow tree
MacKenzie of old beer ads
Honey relative?
Fairy-tale beast
___ de Triomphe
Hit the horn on a subcompact
Bad thing to have at a housewarming?
Flaps the gums
Turn tail
Spiral-horned African creature
Shoe type
Temporary property holder
Dressy trousers feature
Sang "Silent Night" here and there
Muzzleloader accessory
Like Count Basie's "Doll"
Atty's. group
Resist a roaming charge
___ Aviv, Israel
Word with "flotation" or "mnemonic"
Eye part
90-degree joint
Long, broad strips
Drummer's forte

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Sours: https://crossword365.com/clue/mackenzie-of-old-beer-ads?register=1
FUNNY AUSTRALIAN LAGER BEER ADVERTS

Bud Light is bringing back a controversial mascot who once helped sales soar 20%

Bud Light Super Bowl Image 2
Bud Light
Bud Light is reviving its most controversial mascot of all time: Spuds MacKenzie. 

The beer brand will debut a commercial starring the ghost of Spuds MacKenzie during the Super Bowl on Sunday. In the ad, Spuds takes on a Christmas Carol-esque role, encouraging an anti-social young man to spend more time with his friends. 

Spuds MacKenzie has a rich and controversial place in Bud Lights' history.

Bud Light first introduced a "super party animal named Spuds MacKenzie," during the Super Bowl in 1987 and the dog was an immediate hit. The Bull Terrier helped increase Bud Light sales by 20% between 1987 and 1988, The New York Times reported.

Spuds was everywhere — on t-shirts, posters, lamps, and more. Sir Mix-A-Lot even drew inspiration from the ads, telling the AV Club in 2003 that his iconic song "Baby Got Back" was intended to praise women who didn't look like "the Spuds MacKenzie girls," which he described as "little skinny chicks looking like stop signs, with big hair and skinny bodies."

Spuds' time in the spotlight was short-lived, however, in part due to intense opposition from a US senator. 

Spuds archive photo
Bud Light
Republican Senator Strom Thurmond accused Bud Light of using Spuds as a mascot to encourage under-aged drinking and glamorize the use of alcohol. In November 1987, Thurmond took to the Senate floor waving a stuffed "Spuds MacKenzie" doll and demanded that Anheuser-Busch halt the campaign. 
Spuds MacKenzie
Bud Light

"I am not confident in the voluntary efforts of the alcohol beverage industry to increase public awareness of the hazards of alcohol abuse," Thurmond said, according to the Associated Press. "With 12-year-olds drinking wine coolers and wearing 'Spuds MacKenzie' T-shirts, there is no basis for such confidence."

Mothers Against Drunk Driving launched a campaign against Spuds, and some schools began banning apparel featuring the canine. 

The mascot was retired in 1989, with Bud Light saying it was simply time to move on creatively.

As Spuds became an icon, the canine's personal life was put under the microscope.

As part of Spuds macho image, the dog dressed in a tuxedo, driven around in limousines, and surrounded by beautiful "Spudettes."

However, it was soon discovered that the party animal was in fact a female dog. People reported that the brand's representatives went as far as shielding the canine actor, whose real name was Honey Tree Evil Eye, from cameras with their coats while she relieved herself.

The original party animal

A photo posted by Svetlana Legetic (@svetlanabyt) on Sep 3, 2016 at 12:23pm PDT

Gossip didn't end with questions of Spuds' gender.

Rumors that Spuds died in a limo crash or while strapped to a surfboard had to be debunked by People a few months after the Super Bowl ad ran.

Honey Tree Evil Eye died in 1993 after four years of retirement. 

Honey Tree Evil Eye, nicknamed Evie, spent her final years in North Riverside, Illinois, and was 10 years old when she passed away due to kidney failure.

This Super Bowl, a new canine will take on the title of Spuds. Now, it's time to see if he (or she) can live up to the party animal image that made Spuds an '80s icon — and breathe new life into the Bud Light brand. 

This isn't the first time a brand has tried to resurect a mascot. 

When KFC brought Colonel Sanders back from the dead in May 2015, the chain faced some backlash from customers who believed the ads to be too irreverent. However, the chain's sales have steadily grown in the almost two years since the return of the Colonel. 

Colonel Sanders was not portrayed as a ghost, as Spuds will be in the ad. 

Here's Bud Light's Super Bowl ad, titled "Ghost Spud":

 

Sours: https://www.businessinsider.com/bud-light-spuds-mackenzie-super-bowl-ad-2017-2

Ads mackenzie of old beer

The Return of Spuds MacKenzie, The Bud Light Dog, Is a Big Deal

All dogs go to heaven, but only a select few show up as ghosts in Super Bowl commercials. Spuds MacKenzie, the lovable beer spokes-pup and one-time political lightning rod, has never been an ordinary four-legged creature, and his triumphant return to primetime tonight during Super Bowl LI was no ordinary advertisement. After nearly two decades away from the spotlight, this controversial pet is back -- even though some viewers might have no idea who he was in the first place.

If you're under 30, Spuds MacKenzie might sound vaguely familiar. Following his 1987 Super Bowl debut in a series of ads for Bud Light, the lovable English bull terrier became a mainstream phenomenon, appearing on talk shows with Dick Clark and earning his own plush toys, and he went on to inspire parodies on animated series like Futurama, The Simpsons, and Family Guy. Before the Taco Bell Chihuahua or Bullseye the Target dog, there was Spuds MacKenzie, king of commercial dogs.

What made Spuds so special? And why is he back to celebrate his 30th anniversary? Grab a couple cold ones and read on to find out.

click to play video

Why is he back?

Ad campaigns never really die in a media climate that increasingly relies on nostalgia to sell products. Instead, they go into hibernation, then reemerge in new forms that speak to our collective memory of the past -- often with a few slick, winking updates. For example, while the original Spuds ads from the 1980s featured the velvet-ey voice-over skills of Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous host Robin Leach, the new Super Bowl commercial, which was created by the super-agency Wieden & Kennedy, features Carl Weathers (Rocky) as the voice of Spuds. It's double the nostalgia.

In the new spot, a guy is getting ready to spend a night in when Spuds -- now in computer-assisted ghost form -- floats into his slick bachelor pad and takes the young bro on a It's A Wonderful Life style journey. Why is Spuds inspired to come down from heaven? "My soul can't rest when people don't drink Bud Lights with friends," says the dog in the ad. "At this very moment your friends are hanging out and you're missing it."

But why did the company, which consistently makes waves at the Super Bowl with its ads, think now was the perfect time for Spuds to return? Bud Light VP Alex Lambrecht told Ad Age that the commercial, which will only air during the big game, is designed to tie into the company's "Famous Among Friends" campaign. What's old is new. New-ish

"We wanted to do something that is appropriate to the cultural moment and we feel Super Bowl is that perfect moment to make a statement," says Lambrecht in the article. "On Monday, the day after the game, we will send out a final message from Spuds MacKenzie where he is going to be thanking all the viewers [and] all of his friends in the U.S. and being happy that he can go back to afterlife [and] enjoy a Bud Light with the Budweiser frogs."

click to play video

Who is Spuds MacKenzie?

In 1987, the New York Giants defeated the Denver Broncos and won their first Super Bowl ever. The ads featured during the event included a Diet Pepsi spot where Michael J. Fox leaped out his window, ran through traffic, and intimidated some bikers on his way to getting a sugar water drink for his attractive female neighbor. Pierce Bronsan also defeated a ninja for a Diet Coke. But the Back to the Future star and the future James Bond were not the only stars on display that night.

The first set of Spuds MacKenzie commercials, which you can view above, followed a pretty strict formula: a party is going on, a dog named Spuds MacKenzie arrives with some Bud Lights, and people lose their shit. That's literally it. There's a Beach Boys-lite theme song in one version that dubs him "a super party animal," and the jingle gets a reggae and country remix in the other spots. Sometimes Spuds wears sunglasses. Sometimes he rides a skateboard. In one ad, he plays the drums.

Like many things from the '80s, Spuds MacKenzie is so defiantly low-concept that he can be a little difficult to explain. As noted in this excellent Mental Floss history of Spuds, the ads were designed to be slick parodies that used "overt self-awareness" to cater to the audience's hip sensibility. The simplicity of the ads -- or the dumbness, depending on how you view it -- flattered viewers who thought they could see through cheesy commercials. 

Does the dog have a catchphrase? No. Does he talk? No. Do bikini-clad women in the commercials imply they want to have sex with him? Yes. If you compare the "classic" '80s version of the ad to the new one, that creepy, leering quality has been replaced with a more modern message about the canine beer enthusiast wanting you to spend time with your male and female friends. Apparently in his ghostly form, Spuds is less of a lothario.

But the women shown in the commercials had a surprising cultural impact: they inadvertently inspired Sir Mix-A-Lot's classic hip-hop song "Baby Got Back," which came out in 1992. "You had these Spuds MacKenzie girls, little skinny chicks looking like stop signs, with big hair and skinny bodies," the rapper later said in an interview with the AV Club. "I did it as a knee-jerk response to that kind of stuff. I didn't think it would ever be popular, but there were a lot of chicks out there with the J. Lo body, and they wore sweaters around their waists because they were told that they had fat asses–in a negative way, not in a good way."

click to play video

Why was he controversial?

Spuds was not beloved by everyone. Republican Senator Strom Thurmond was not a fan of the dog's antics, arguing that ads were designed to target kids. "The stuffed animals, children's toys and T-shirts small enough to fit 12-year-olds indicate the real purpose of the campaign," said Thurmond in a 1987 L.A. Times article about the controversy.

As Spuds mania gripped the country, the debate around the campaign also intensified. As Mental Floss points out, stores in Ohio pulled Bud Light containers that featured the dog dressed as Santa Claus, which violated a state liquor law, and schools had to ban students from wearing highly coveted Spuds gear in the classroom. In the coming years, Anheuser-Busch launched a responsible drinking ad campaign that was clearly a pivot away from the goofy, fun-loving antics of Spuds.

In 1989, Spuds was retired and the campaign was phased out amidst rumors of the dog's untimely death. It turns out, those rumors were completely unfounded: the furry thespian that played the original Spuds -- which was actually a female dog named Honey Tree Evil Eye -- still belonged to Jackie and Stanley Ole, a couple from North Riverside, Illinois who, according to this Peoplearticle about Spuds death rumors, had a statue of it in their front yard. Evie, as the animal was more commonly referred to as, died in 1993 of kidney failure. She was 10 years old.

But her legacy lives on: the new Spuds featured in the Super Bowl LI ad was also a female dog, a bull terrier named Gigi. While it's unlikely that this particular ad will lead to Congressman condemning the beer company, children sporting Spuds gear on the playground, or the dog making the rounds on late night talk shows, it will leave an impression on viewers, setting the stage for another anniversary in 10 years. Spuds may have ascended to heaven, but he'll be back. 

Sign up here for our daily Thrillist email, and get your fix of the best in food/drink/fun.

Dan Jackson is a staff writer at Thrillist Entertainment. He's on Twitter @danielvjackson.

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Sours: https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/spuds-mackenzie-bud-light-super-bowl-li-commercial
Classic Beer Commercial Compliation -- Beer Ads

Spuds MacKenzie

Spuds MacKenzie in an ad.

Spuds MacKenzie is a fictional dog (bull terrier) character used for an extensive advertising campaign marketing Bud Light beer in the late 1980s. The Spuds MacKenzie mascot and campaign was the idea of a 23-year-old art director, Jon Moore. At the time, he was working at Needham, Harper, and Steers, a Chicago advertising agency. The dog first showed up in a Bud Light Super Bowl XXI ad in 1987.[1]

The dog was portrayed by a female bull terrier named Honey Tree Evil Eye,[2] or Evie for short (October 7, 1983 – May 31, 1993). Evie was from Woodstock, Illinois, and lived in North Riverside, Illinois, with her owner's family, where she later died of kidney failure in 1993.[3][4] Anheuser-Busch sponsored many dogs from the kennel in Illinois where Evie was from.[5]

The Spuds McKenzie ad campaign was not without its share of controversy. Shortly after Spuds' rise to fame, it was learned that the dog, portrayed as male in the ads, was actually female.[5] The ads were criticized for promoting the consumption of alcohol by children by politicians and advocacy groups. Soon after the ads first aired in 1987, Senator Strom Thurmond began his own media campaign, claiming that the beer maker was using Spuds to appeal to children in order to get them interested in their product at an early age.[6] By Christmas 1987, more legal action resulted from Budweiser's use of ads featuring Spuds dressed as Santa, which is illegal in states such as Ohio.[7]

In 1989, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, along with Mothers Against Drunk Driving, alleged that Anheuser-Busch was pitching the dog to children. Although the Federal Trade Commission found no evidence to support that allegation, Anheuser-Busch decided to retire Spuds in 1989, claiming that the character's image had started to overshadow the product.

In 2017, the character appeared in Bud Light's Super Bowl LI advertisement as a ghost who helps a man named Brian reunite with his friends, in an homage to Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. The house number in this advertisement's last segment is 1989, the year Spuds was retired.[8]

Cultural references[edit]

  • The character Slurms MacKenzie (“The Original Party Worm”) from the television series Futurama is a parody of Spuds, as is Santa's Little Helper’s stint as “Suds McDuff” on the episode "Old Yeller Belly" of The Simpsons.
  • In his late-1980s anti-“sellout” anthem, “This Note's for You” (the title of which parodies Budweiser’s “This Bud's for You” ad campaign), Neil Young says he “ain't singing for Spuds” in the title track. The dog also appears throughout the music video for the song.
  • The commercial's use of skinny females as a standard of beauty inspired Sir Mix-a-Lot to write "Baby Got Back" in retort.[9]
  • An issue of MAD Magazine in the late 1980s had a study of how cultural standards are going downhill, as one example, tracing how America's favorite dog went from Lassie to Benji to Spuds MacKenzie.
  • A story arc in the comic strip Bloom County involved a drunken Spuds admitting her female gender to Opus and eventually checking into the Betty Ford Center, where she roomed with Mr. Ed.
  • Appears in the Family Guy episodes "Brian Writes a Bestseller" and "A Fish Out of Water".
  • Tone Lōc's song "Funky Cold Medina" lists Spuds McKenzie as one of the dogs trying to get into his house.
  • In The Golden Girls episode "Larceny and Old Lace", Sophia Petrillo is dating a man named Rocco (played by Mickey Rooney), whom she met in a police lineup. According to her daughter Dorothy Zbornak, Rocco was arrested for "spray-painting something obscene" on a billboard of Spuds MacKenzie. Sophia's response is that because "the dog they use in those ads is really a female, Rocco was just making Spuds anatomically correct".[10]

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spuds_MacKenzie

Similar news:

Stifled moans were heard. And the mother-in-law's whisper: "Pamper the girl, Tanechka, pamper her. Leshka (my father) rarely gives her sweets?" "Re-e-dko" - Mom breathed out.



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